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Dropping like flies in the Golden Globe.

Discussion in 'Racing' started by Jackdaw, Jul 16, 2018. Add this thread to a FAQ

  1. Franklin

    Franklin

    Joined Jul 20, 2005
    2,418 posts, 120 likes
    Whitby 55
    US Kemah, Tx
    I crossed the GofM, and the Caribbean Sea many times without a true backup (just a bolt on wheel drum to do sheet to wheel if need be) but my autopilot was fairly new and I didn't push it hard. I also hand steered a lot.

    Once I decided to head west around the world though I bought a whole new autopilot system that is exactly the same as the one installed, so I could just replace a failed part in minutes and be back at it in no time. I feel much safer now, especially after balancing my rudder so the autopilot doesn't work very hard at all, even when I am pushing he boat hard.

    In my opinion, it is the rudder that is most important but mostly overlooked. All boats these days are built with unbalanced rudders as sailors, especially racers, like the "feel" of it and builders also like the safety thing of it swinging back to center when unmanned. I think a boat doing any serious long offshore sailing needs a balanced rudder to take the pressure off the steering gear and helmsman. It is the pressure from the unbalanced rudders is what is causing so many problems with autopilots.
     


    Rick D, FDL S2 and jon hansen like this.
  2. Franklin

    Franklin

    Joined Jul 20, 2005
    2,418 posts, 120 likes
    Whitby 55
    US Kemah, Tx
    Totally agree. When single handling the GofM and Caribbean sea, my mind would have a different outlook on life than when I was in harbor and working. When doing the 30 days from PC to Hiva Oa, it was the same but on steroids. I was even contemplating not finishing my around the world trip and building a house, finding a wife and raising a family on an island somewhere and staying put. But just a day or two back in harbor all those thoughts go away and I'm back at it, planning the next leg.

    I found the wife in Tonga and now have that family, but we are a cruising family and I don't have to be alone anymore. Sometimes I miss the days of single handling but I don't miss what the mind does while out there alone for days or weeks.
     


    Rick D, FDL S2 and Will Gilmore like this.
  3. jon hansen

    jon hansen

    Joined May 25, 2012
    1,382 posts, 858 likes
    john alden caravelle 42
    us sturgeon bay, wis
  4. Will Gilmore

    Will Gilmore

    Joined Oct 19, 2017
    4,164 posts, 2,110 likes
    O'Day 19
    US Littleton, NH
    Close finish, at this point. Exciting.

    -Will (Dragonfly)
     


  5. Tally Ho

    Tally Ho

    Joined Jan 7, 2011
    1,198 posts, 214 likes
    Oday 322
    US East Chicago, IN


  6. Will Gilmore

    Will Gilmore

    Joined Oct 19, 2017
    4,164 posts, 2,110 likes
    O'Day 19
    US Littleton, NH
    Never gave much thought to the specific criteria for circumnavigation. This is an interesting video.


    -Will (Dragonfly)
     


    Last edited: Jan 23, 2019
  7. shemandr

    shemandr

    Joined Jan 1, 2006
    3,850 posts, 820 likes
    Marblehead Skiff 14'
    US Greenport, NY
    Do as the finish approaches only two boats are competing for first place. One is already broken and they are approaching some low pressure systems. I'm not sure where the finish line is but more bad weather is not what I would want after a trip around the world. I guess there is a dust up about what was or was not communicated over ham radio regarding weather. It sounds like the affected boats are not allowed to receive transmissions regarding weather? How is that enforced? I never liked this restriction on communication for this race and still don't.
     


    Will Gilmore likes this.
  8. shemandr

    shemandr

    Joined Jan 1, 2006
    3,850 posts, 820 likes
    Marblehead Skiff 14'
    US Greenport, NY
    At 5 minutes I still don't know how antipodes affect this race course. But the orange made me hungry.
     


  9. LakeShark

    LakeShark

    Joined Sep 15, 2016
    394 posts, 155 likes
    Catalina 22
    US Minnesota
    Both boats got news about the weather front coming in over their last Sat Phone interview with the race committee. So not sure how much more dust there is to shake up. Slats is still 2 days behind the leader even if the leader pauses for the weather. Still amazing to have a finish this close with only 5 left in the race.
     


    Will Gilmore likes this.
  10. LakeShark

    LakeShark

    Joined Sep 15, 2016
    394 posts, 155 likes
    Catalina 22
    US Minnesota
    Looks like were going to have a winner early tomorrow AM for those that are still following this thread.
    Jean-Luc van den Heede is only 64.8 miles from the finish. Last sat call was confirming his arrival time. Mark Slats is going to be 2nd with 401 miles to go and is expected to arrive sometime thursday. Amazingly close race after 211 days!
     


    FDL S2 and Will Gilmore like this.
  11. Jackdaw

    Jackdaw

    Joined Nov 8, 2010
    9,754 posts, 2,795 likes
    Beneteau First 36.7 & 260
    US Minneapolis MN & Bayfield WI
    Thats kinda silly and misses the point. An entrant in the GGR needs to do none of those things on that list in the video. This is a sailboat RACE, with a course defined the NOR and SI. You start, sail the course, and finish. First one there wins.

    2.5 GGR Route
    2.5.1 The Race course is around the world east about.
    The start of the GGR will be in the general area of the Les Sables d’Olonne harbour.
    The entrants will sail down the Atlantic from North to South.
    Leaving:
    ● An inshore Canary Island mark (TBA) to starboard
    ● Cape of Good Hope to port
    ● 44 degrees South latitude to starboard
    ● Cape Leuwin to port
    ● to a ‘Gate”(TBA) in Storm Bay Tasmania
    ● Snares Islands to Starboard.
    ● Bounty Islands to Starboard.
    ● Waypoint 46 degrees South Latitude and 174 degrees’ west longitude to
    starboard.
    ● 46 degrees’ south latitude to starboard until east of 115 degrees’ west
    longitude.
    ● 50 degrees’ south latitude and 90 degrees west longitude to port.
    ● Cape Horn to port
    Sail up the Atlantic from South to North. Then to the Finish line outside the harbour
    of Les Sables d’Olonne.

    Do that and you have sailed the course. Now much of this has been created to create a circumnavigation, including the single waypoint (allowed under the WSSRC) to stretch the shortest line around that waypoints to be longer than 21600NM.
     



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