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What is this called??

Jun 17, 2019
23
Catalina 30 Texas south port
Good evening folks,

Was just wondering what this piece of the boat was called and whats the use as well? It looks like the line will gave way soon so I was going to cut and put a new knot on. Any suggestions any which knot I should use?

Thank you.

392C60F2-D423-41AA-93BA-47DD5937C010.jpeg
 

Ward H

.
Nov 7, 2011
3,129
Catalina 30 Mk II Barnegat, NJ
Thats the topping lift, that holds up the boom. In your case it is an adjustable topping lift.
I like to use a halyard hitch, which is a compact knot, when possible but you could also use a bowline.
 
Jun 17, 2019
23
Catalina 30 Texas south port
Thats the topping lift, that holds up the boom. In your case it is an adjustable topping lift.
I like to use a halyard hitch, which is a compact knot, when possible but you could also use a bowline.
Thank you sir, and is this piece used to raise and lower the boom for angles of sail or reefing or what exactly?
 

Dave Groshong

SBO Staff
Staff member
Jan 25, 2007
1,794
Catalina 22 Seattle
A goofy arrangement for a topping lift, but not unusual at all, wire/rope combination. You can run it as a halyard, better in my opinion, but there is really nothing wrong with that, as Kings mentioned, it is only for holding up the boom when the sail is down.
 

Ward H

.
Nov 7, 2011
3,129
Catalina 30 Mk II Barnegat, NJ
Its main purpose is to keep the boom up out of the cockpit when the main is lowered. When you raise the main it should become slack. Some prefer the boom to be higher and out of the way when not sailing so you may be adjusting it often.
It's not used for angles of sail or reefing, except to keep the boom from dropping into the cockpit when you ease the halyard.
I set mine to keep the boom above the dodger. When I raise the main, it is slack so it doesn't need further adjustment.
 
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Feb 8, 2014
1,300
Columbia 36 Muskegon
And it looks like it's tight with the sail up. It shouldn't be, that adversely affects the sail shape. Slack it off a little, the sail should take all the weight of the boom. If that makes the boom too low with the sail furled, that's why it's adjustable.
 
May 24, 2004
6,794
CC 30 South Florida
Thank you sir, and is this piece used to raise and lower the boom for angles of sail or reefing or what exactly?
It just holds the boom up at a desired angle. Can be used to clear cockpit headroom at anchor. It also supports the boom to allow it to be used as a crane arm to lift supplies into the boat. Some even use it to clear the front of a bimini top at the expense of sail shape.
 
Jun 17, 2019
23
Catalina 30 Texas south port
Thank you very much guys, very informative. I am self taught and mainly just use the sheets and halyard for the most part, just noticed this the other day and thought it didn’t look good, fraying and such. Will definitely give it some slack, would have never known!

Instead of a new post, how do I lower the jib to make a sail repair? Its a roller furling. My last boat a Columbia was a bit simpler in that regard, just lower the jib halyard and good to go. Unless I just have to unfurl the jib then lower the sail with the halyard. Haven’t quite looked. Always best to ask, not many sailors around my dock. And still pretty new to this Catalina. Thank you.
 
Jul 27, 2011
4,530
Bavaria 38E Alamitos Bay
It just holds the boom up at a desired angle. Can be used to clear cockpit headroom at anchor. It also supports the boom to allow it to be used as a crane arm to lift supplies into the boat. Some even use it to clear the front of a bimini top at the expense of sail shape.
When sailing my Pearson 30 in FL, I sometimes used the topping lift to support the boom when I or my crew had to scoot outboard on it to heel the boat enough to get off of a mud bank or sandy shoal.:biggrin: Not that uncommon in FL. A handy piece of rigging when you need it.
 
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Joe

.
Jun 1, 2004
7,454
Catalina 27 Mission Bay, San Diego
The type furling unit on the boat is important info. The lesser expensive types, like CDW, will have an "internal halyard" built into the foil (or tube) supporting the sail. Higher end furlers have a different type foil which allows reefing the sail in addition to just storing it, and, will use the boat's jib halyard attached to a swivel for hoisting and lowering. These types of furling units make it much easier to remove or change the sail. In either case... it is easier to determine what brand and model you have and then do a simple google search for the product manual.
 
Last edited:
Apr 26, 2015
643
S2 26 Mid On Trailer
:plus: on what Joe has to say about the furler.

The topping lift you have can also be used to open the leech when sailing in light air when the boom weight is pulling it closed, resulting in better sail shape and performance. When used in this manner you do have to flick it around to the windward side of the sail when you change tacks, if it hangs on the leech during the tack.
 
Jul 27, 2011
4,530
Bavaria 38E Alamitos Bay
I suppose in a pinch, you might be able to use it as a spare main halyard (MH) if the actual one got away from you somehow. My TL is sheaved at the mast head next to the MH, leads to a turning block at the tabernacle, then through a line organizer to a rope clutch near the winch. So, I could winch it and stop it off if need as a substitute, temporary, main halyard. But it’s not of the kind of rope normally used for halyards.
 

LloydB

.
Jan 15, 2006
543
Macgregor 22 Silverton
Converting your topping lift to a halyard makes no sense to me because the adjustment is at the leach end of the boom.
As to what kind of a knot, you may like the looks of an eye splice on the end of the new line instead of a knot.
 
Jul 12, 2011
985
Catalina 36 1771 Ft Pierce, Florida
Tips on removing sail from roller furling -
  1. Pick your day for lower wind speed, and wind coming mainly from forward.
  2. Have a few sail ties handy to secure the thing once it hits the deck. Even if you plan to move it ashore immediately, it's safer so it does not get away from you.
  3. If the wind is with you, you can do the entire dropping yourself by doubling the end of the fore halyard around a winch or turning block, then forward to the fore deck. Release the clutch, and let off the line when you are ready to catch.
  4. Never let any sail get between your feet and the deck. It's not so much that it's bad for the sail (it is a little), but it's slippery as hell and you could slide right off that foredeck. Don't ask how I figured this out. :banghead:
  5. You'll need to remove two shackles before removing the sail - head and tack, so be ready with pliers if the shackles are not cooperative. Once any shackle is loose, it will try to dive into the water, so be ready for it to escape. Again, I figured this out the hard way.
  6. On re-installing, a 'pre-feeder' saves a bunch of effort (google that, then say "oh my god they are expensive!"). You tie it off with a light line to the roller drum near the tack so that the leach is pulled along the deck and positioned correctly for the slot. It takes a bit of adjusting to get the angles right, so once you do mark your line for next time.
Congratulations on your Catalina 30. You may want to consider joining the Catalina 30 owners association, for more specific information on your particular boat (well worth the $30/year, particularly for the first year): International Catalina 30 Association
 
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