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That sinking feeling....

Oct 29, 2005
2,188
Hunter Marine 326 303 Singapore
So is it just washing the whole boat or is she a sailboat-submarine hybrid? ;)
Ok seriously, what caused the sinking? Anyone know?
 
Sep 15, 2009
6,242
S2 9.2a Fairhope Al
what caused the sinking?

i got to do this ..i just got to do this....:laugh:...TO MUCH WATER INSIDE THE BOAT...:laugh:.... we had one ...a bayliner i think back when the storms blow through down here sink...they took a high volume pump and brought her back up in about 4 hrs time seems slow after watching the video
 
Mar 30, 2013
684
Allied Seawind MK II 32' Oologah Lake, Oklahoma
As part of my submarine qualifications I learned that excess water in the people tank is a bad thing. This applies to "open top" people tanks s well..
 
Sep 25, 2008
923
Macgregor & Island Packet VENTURE 25 & IP-38 NORTH EAST, MD
Oh, that's one of those water ballast MacGregor's
 

shnool

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Aug 10, 2012
556
WD Schock Wavelength 24 Wallenpaupack
Oh, that's one of those water ballast MacGregor's
Um, no (and I get the joke) its a water ballasted hunter... although methinks that wasn't the designers idea.
Specifically it appears to be a Hunter 285.

Actually I can't tell you the number of times I've had this exact nightmare play out in my head. You see none of my boats have had electric bilge pumps (a 22, a 25, and now a 26), 2 just has the manual type. My present boat has a manual one that I've found does not work (silly me found out just this year). So I'm fitting her up with an electric one before splash this season, and will be buying a kit to repair the manual one (to be installed sometime after splash). I'm at my boat 2-3 times a week all season, but a lot can happen in the hours between. I feel for the owner.

PS: A couple years back I was looking at a C&C 29 Mark II that someone recovered from the bottom of a lake. It was a beautiful boat, but the questionable refloating and condition (pickling) of the diesel engine prevented me from pulling the trigger (on what would have been an awesome deal). The boats name was also "Osprey." Note to self, never name your boat "Osprey." Shame it's a pretty cool name.
 
Apr 8, 2010
1,625
Ericson Yachts Olson 34 28400 Portland OR
Even if it were a higher-value brand of vessel, it's probably an insurance total. Certainly Repairable, but only with a lot of time and even more money. Plus, any future buyer will be wary of it with that title history.

L
 
Apr 19, 2012
1,043
O'Day Daysailor 17 Nevis MN
Pictures like this make me glad my "Miss Behavin' " has built in positive flotation.
 
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Jan 14, 2014
225
Newport Newport 28 Fair Haven, NY
Ok seriously, what caused the sinking? Anyone know?
I'm guessing something popped off a thru-hull, based on that someone hopped down below, came up, and then the floats were removed and it was "fine" again. I'm guessing a hose failure, they closed the thru-hull after it was floating again, and now the process starts again.
 
Nov 8, 2010
11,385
Beneteau First 36.7 & 260 Minneapolis MN & Bayfield WI
Back from the DEAD???

LMAO. Just because you can dig up a body from its grave doesn't mean its going to come back to life.
 
May 12, 2004
1,340
Hunter Cherubini 30 New Port Richey
C'mon Jackdaw. Have a little more optimism. While we like to think of our boats that keep us safe and provide unlimited amounts of fun as living, breathing entities, they are, in fact, just hunks of fiberglass, metal, wood, fabric, etc. Just about anything can be brought back to "life" given enough elbow grease and $$$. Just sayin'. :)
 
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Nov 8, 2010
11,385
Beneteau First 36.7 & 260 Minneapolis MN & Bayfield WI
C'mon Jackdaw. Have a little more optimism. While we like to think of our boats that keep us safe and provide unlimited amounts of fun as living, breathing entities, they are, in fact, just hunks of fiberglass, metal, wood, fabric, etc. Just about anything can be brought back to "life" given enough elbow grease and $$$. Just sayin'. :)
Oh I get that for sure. I love boats, and mine in particular. But there are limits. For me, my time is worth as much as my money, if not more. And I have a keen sense of what 'negative economic value' means. Because that is not a priceless and rare artifact they are pulling off the bottom. Its a low-value 80s boat that now needs every single system replaced or reworked. You could buy a replacement model for 1/2 of what that is going to cost. To me it makes as much sense as restoring this. ;^)



1000 hours and $10,000 later, its still a 1974 Pinto. And still worth $5000.
 
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Sep 15, 2009
6,242
S2 9.2a Fairhope Al
Oh I get that for sure. I love boats, and mine in particular. But there are limits. For me, my time is worth as much as my money, if not more. And I have a keen sense of what 'negative economic value' means. Because that is not a priceless and rare artifact they are pulling off the bottom. Its a low-value 80s boat that now needs every single system replaced or reworked. You could buy a replacement model for 1/2 of what that is going to cost. To me it makes as much sense as restoring this. ;^)

i would love to get my hands on that and drop a 4 cylinder diesel in it
 
May 12, 2004
1,340
Hunter Cherubini 30 New Port Richey
Oh I get that for sure. I love boats, and mine in particular. But there are limits. For me, my time is worth as much as my money, if not more.
I totally agree. The only opinion that matters here, unless asked, is that of the owner. For me, as much as it would hurt, if my boat sunk ... salvage. :wahwah:
 

RussC

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Sep 11, 2015
1,530
Merit 22- Oregon lakes
I don't see where the owner even plans to let it sail again. maybe the marina just wanted it's slip back.
 
Apr 19, 2012
1,043
O'Day Daysailor 17 Nevis MN
It's probably because I live so far from the water and tinkering is often my only way to be "messing about in boats" or I may be just a glutton for punishment but I would take that boat in a heartbeat. I'd store it in my back yard and spend a couple of weekends a month and a few evenings each week tinkering with her. Before you know it she'd be good as new and ready to sail again.
 
Jan 22, 2008
296
Islander Freeport, 41 Ketch Longmont, CO
Well our racers like to sink their boats on occasion. Had one, (Santana 20) go down in 14 ft of water on Thursday afternoon practice run - refloated the boat and they raced it on Sunday (couldn't get the motor started on Sat. or they would have raced Sat.). The other (Again a different Santana 20) sank during a sudden blow in 175' water, two weeks later, after a nice technical dive, it was refloated and after a week of cleanup it finished the season. During that same storm we turtled a j24 which took about 3 1 /2 hours by 7 of us to drain and two weeks later it was back racing as well.
The fun part was watching the Santana come up from the deep with sails still set.
Freshwater lakes are much easier to recover from.
Then of course there was the jet boat that docked stern to the 6 ft waves during a storm but... that is another story !!
 
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Apr 2, 2014
7
Hunter 36e Staten Island
Gents,
Sadly I almost had the same experience but I was lucky enough to be on the boat at the time! My 1986 Hunter 285 was fresh from it's winter cradle and the crack crew (I think that's what they were on) had prepared the boat with new hoses, belts, braces, etc to set up for a trouble-free season in lovely Jamaica bay. After a quick run through warming up the little Yanmar I headed out past the last section of slips only to hear "..Say fella...Your sitting funny in the water!"

Made it back to the slings just in time. The water made it to the floor of the cabin just as we were pulling it back out. I was lucky that the fellow behind me on the launch wasn't ready ...probably rechecking all his hose clamps. lesson learned...