South African "Catalina" 22

greg_m

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May 23, 2017
692
Catalina Jaguar 22 Simons Town
The wooden rub rails for the side of the boat was a particularly challenging project. I needed wood long enough as well as a table saw to cut an L-shape profile to fit over the hull/deck joint. Neither items did I have!

A friend of mine recently purchased a "flat"... you guys call it an "apartment". Who knows...

Anyways, this flat is from circa 1960...something, so it is old with old internal fittings. But, luckily for me, wooden furnishing from the 60's is top class wood. So he ripped out all the old wooden door frames and cupboards because he wants "modern". I politely helped him remove the old wood to my place! So now I had strips of good solid wood in lengths that were usable. I had to remove all the old nails and trim them to length that were usable.

I needed the table saw but as previously mentioned all and everything not health or food related was closed off/shut doors as a result of lockdown! I had to make my own table saw. This took a couple of days with odds and ends from my wood pile and eventually it was ready to be used. Actually that was a very nice project all of its own.

I needed to drill out and tap threads into the hull deck joint where the bolts for the rub rails will be fitted. Then i needed to work out the lengths so that the scarf joints required would be supported at a bolt fixing point. The curve of the deck is not too severe and the wooden strips bend quite easily to match.

In order to ensure an even sort of bending stress I weighed the lengths of wood to match the density of the pieces either side. I used the table saw arrangement to cut the lengths to size and then also to cut the lengths to the L-shape profile. I did cut a test piece beforehand to get the sizing correct.
 

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greg_m

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May 23, 2017
692
Catalina Jaguar 22 Simons Town
Wooden rubrails continued...

Then I had to make a tool to cut the scarfs into the lengths using the table saw. Another days project. That's what onlookers don't really get. The time consumed to complete a task. What seems like it should take an hour ends up being most of the day! Then they stop to ask "what's taking so long?"... of course my response cannot be mentioned out loud or written here!

So, eventually I had all the correctly shaped pieces. I bonded the scarf joints with epoxy glue and left then to cure for a couple of days. After a rudimentary cleaning with the belt sander to get rid of excess glue and fine shape the joints I measured and drilled the necessary holes and then fitted the long lengths, 6.5m long, to the boat. They do look good but I need to still come up with a plan for the ends. What shape or finish should I use?
 

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greg_m

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May 23, 2017
692
Catalina Jaguar 22 Simons Town
Wooden rubrails fitted but not finished off. Still working on final fit, what to do about the ends as well as final sanding and varnishing.

The concept idea fits well and looks pretty good to me.
 

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greg_m

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May 23, 2017
692
Catalina Jaguar 22 Simons Town
The main hatch sliding rails. This one posting cannot do justice to the amount of time and effort that went into these two pieces of wood. The shaping, eyeballing, measuring, adjusting, trimming, routering, sanding, epoxy coating, sanding, varnishing, sanding, varnishing.... man it took days!

The rails are in place, fitted, however as with everything else needs to come off to finish the white paint topcoat. Been looking around for a suitable garage for this but the main problem is the trailer is not ready to carry the boat anywhere! Thats a whole nother job there.

The rails ended up with a banana shaped bow in them even though I shaped the bottom faces to a gentle curve. This is because the actual coachroof has a moulded in banana curve lengthwise. Even the sliding hatch has a slight bow in the sliding faces. I had to also trim the sliding faces on the hatch themeselves as I had made them too wide when rebuilding the hatch itself. The left side, oops, the port side binds a little and thus i may need to open the slot up another millimeter or so.

They look good and are fit for purpose = happiness!
 

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Grotto

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Feb 18, 2018
237
Catalina 22 Wilmington
Greg you are amazing. I was going to joke you should finish the rub rails with scrimshawed mermaids, but damned if you wouldn’t learn how and do exactly that and make it look like it was supposed to be there. This thread is a master class on how to refit an old hull. Great job, now go sailing(if allowed)
 

greg_m

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May 23, 2017
692
Catalina Jaguar 22 Simons Town
Unfortunately recreational activity... including sailing, for some unfathomable reason is still not allowed. Apparently we not allowed to sail because they don't want us sailors to put sea rescue lives in danger... I mean hello, we all incompetent idiots! FFS...
 
Jun 3, 2016
29
Hunter 356 Vancouver, BC
This brought back good memories for me! We sailed a Jaguar 22 on the Vaal dam back in the 80’s. Did the “Round the Island” race many times. Boat was called “Blue Jeans”.
 
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greg_m

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May 23, 2017
692
Catalina Jaguar 22 Simons Town
This brought back good memories for me! We sailed a Jaguar 22 on the Vaal dam back in the 80’s. Did the “Round the Island” race many times. Boat was called “Blue Jeans”.
As a kid in the 70's and 80's our family would pack up the tents and the GP14 dinghy and my Dabchick dinghy and go camping for the holidays at the Vaal. I sailed the round the island on my Dabbie a few times! Long haul for a 10 y/o on a glorified wind surfer but really great sailing experience. Unfortunately the majority population have managed to turn the beautiful Vaal dam and river into a garbage and sewage cesspool. I don't go there anymore...
 

greg_m

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May 23, 2017
692
Catalina Jaguar 22 Simons Town
The mast tabernacle... I spent some time cleaning and polishing up the stainless. years of neglect and weathering had left it looking rather galvanised. I decided to use roof sheeting bolts (carriage bolts?) to bolt the tabernacle in place. I just like the smooth dome shape finish they produce. I had to file the original holes square as I was literally putting square pegs into round holes! :biggrin:

I then applied grey butyl tape to seal/bond the face to the coachroof top. I chamfered out the holes on the top to accommodate an o-ring of butyl tape around the bolts as well as "machined" the washers landing faces on the inside lining. I also put a bead of butyl around the bolt heads for added waterproofness! I still need to cut them shorter with a dremel cut off disc tool.

All bolted in place ready for the mast! You can see the overhead power cables running down my side of the street. They are not insulated (bare copper cables) and they carry 380V AC! This is a bit of a hindrance to raising the mast :banghead:
 

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Jul 13, 2015
768
Catalina 22 #2552 2252 Kennewick, WA
do you have pics of the mast up prior? Just curious how that tabernacle lays out with your mast-- very different clearly than the US arrangement.
 

greg_m

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May 23, 2017
692
Catalina Jaguar 22 Simons Town
Soooo... yet another unfinished job needed completing. The transom!

In the early days of this resto I decided I wanted to recore the entire transom. This entailed cutting out the lining internally, the back inside face of the transom (cockpit rear face and floor area) as well as the lining around the perimeter of the transom inside the hull. I sheeted the internal faces with 6mm waterproof ply, bonded in place with the peanut butter mix previously described and screwed from the outside to ensure maximum bond and matching the transom curve in all directions. I then double the layers in way of center section for the rudder support with 12mm waterproof ply suitable bonded in place. Then everything got two layers of CSM/poly resin to seal and more layers where strength mattered. This was then left to tackle other jobs.

I had to clean the rotting gelcoat out the cockpit locker recesses which was so bad it actually left holes. So the recesses around the cockpit locker hatch openings were needing to be repaired with two layers of CSM. I also had to cover the rear faces of the transom and then also brought the layers of CSM up over the coamings on the transom. This to repair the edges as well as add rounded smoothing to the edges. There was also a nasty autobody filler repair to a crack in the rear port side of the cockpit that had to be eliminated and repaired properly!

I added multiple layers of CSM to the area where the rudder pintles will be mounted. This was then left to cure for a couple of days.

All this work was done with polyester laminating resins - non-waxed stuff.
 

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greg_m

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May 23, 2017
692
Catalina Jaguar 22 Simons Town
After a couple of days it was time to finish off the topcoat for the transom area. I sanded down all the surfaces as far as I was going to topcoat. The cockpit sides and floor still need to be glassed over however now I had run out of materials and in this lockdown everything non-essential was closed for business.

How any government can get away with and justify shutting down an economy that is struggling so totally, estimating 3 to 7 million job losses to "save" the thousands of lives is beyond me. Our daily murder rate far exceeds the covid death toll so far! I also don't understand how foreign governments can keep on throwing money at this corrupt power hungry inept government we have. They got such big mouths and anti white attitudes... cut the flipping aid then from those countries!!! Of course I'm just a whitey minority group member who is supposed to just lump it because of the past, now in excess of 30 years ago, and somehow just continue to pay my taxes and be happy to do so... rant over for now!

So after sanding down and cleaning all the surfaces it was on with the gelcoat topcoat. This fills the CSM random weave of the layup and depending on how you apply it actually produces a very nice smooth or slightly wavy surface. I intend to sand it down and paint over it anyways... idea learned from boatworks today channel. This instead of fairing compound.

So the transom is now completed except for final painting.
 

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greg_m

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May 23, 2017
692
Catalina Jaguar 22 Simons Town
So I actually cant remember when I removed the coach roof vent covers. These have been lying around the garage since way back crying out for attention. I had to sand off the old paint, auto body primer filler layer and the rotten gel coat underneath. Basically back to the original fiberglass layup. This was also cracked/broken/rotted in places around the rim edges - flange!

So the plan was to rebuild these items. I placed a layer of CSM onto a flat surface, filled it with resin then put the cover face down onto the wet fibreglass. I then put down a complete layer of CSM over the top of the covers. This was to rebuild the flange and beef it up a bit as well as to provide a fresh surface to finish off.

So this is the roughed out finish shape of the vent covers.
 

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greg_m

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May 23, 2017
692
Catalina Jaguar 22 Simons Town
The coach roof vents needed to be cut to final size. For the ex Saffas who may read this guess what I used as a source of cardboard for my template?

A little bit of geometry later and I had trimmed the flanges down to correct size. I then coated the vents liberally with gelcoat topcoat because I mixed up way to much :banghead:

Once the gelcoat was cured I had to then sand down all the surfaces that mattered. Inside I just gat a quick sand by hand to remove burrs.

I then needed a bit more geometry to find the locations for drilling the holes for the holding down screws. The holes drilled I could then offer the vents up to the coachroof, mark the hole locations, drill out larger holes, backfill with some thickened resin, wait for it to cure, drill for the small self tapping screws and then screw in place.

Done and fitted, but, like so much else it's not completed. Needs priming and paint to finish off the job. But at least one less pair of holes for the winter rains to flow through!
 

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