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Replacing internal outhaul

Jul 2, 2019
97
Hunter 310 Pine Beach, NJ
OK So I have opened the boom to reaplce / rework my outhaul on my Hunter 310. When I inherited the boat, the outhaul had been jury rigged and had 1:1 purchase due to a previous repair (maybe without propoer resources) that just tied blocks together, sidestepping the original block to block system. The following is my step by step journey. I am very happy with the results and can easily tune the outhaul by hand, other than in big wind, I like to put it on a winch for a quick half turn. My new sail is loose footed so this control is a race adjustment that has come in extremely handy. Please excuse the format. I have entered the steps with one photo per post and the text in the post used as a caption. I could not figure out another way to put text between each picture.

One request... for continuity, please don't comment in the posts until I post "The End."
 
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Jul 2, 2019
97
Hunter 310 Pine Beach, NJ
Started by buying Carbo low friction blocks and bench assembled them like this. Rigged with Novabraid XLE Performer rope. Stayed away from the brand West sells because eye splicing this small diameter (5/16) is very difficult with NE Rope.
IMG_1329.jpg
 
Jul 2, 2019
97
Hunter 310 Pine Beach, NJ
A couple of saw horses make a perfect workbench. Lay out the boom and study the existing rigging. Decide if you want to change the order of rigging and make a list, showing where the lines enter and exit and if they leave the top or bottoms. Tag the old lines and run messengers, transferring the tags. Tie messengers to anything convenient.
 

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Jul 2, 2019
97
Hunter 310 Pine Beach, NJ
Using a punch that fits in the hole in the pop rivet, knock the rivet pin out. Then drill the rivet with a drill that's the nominal size (here a 3/16" bit for a 3/16 rivet). If you have number drills you can drill a few thousandths smaller and the rivet will break apart just fine. With rivets gone, pry the end cap off. Hang on to it so it doesn't fall and twist the lines around.
 

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Jul 2, 2019
97
Hunter 310 Pine Beach, NJ
Showing cap separated and lines / messengers tagged. In the thrid shot "4T" means block 4 in the boom, exiting top side. While the boom was opened I replaced all internal ropes as the entire boat was slated for fresh running rigging.
An important step not shown was to stretch and secure all messengers, then pull themn one at a time while looking down the boom with a flashlight. I found a few lines that needless wound around others, possibly from original construction. I rerouted all so no ropes wound or tangled.
 

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Jul 2, 2019
97
Hunter 310 Pine Beach, NJ
Here is the old yucky ropes and cheapo blocks. Note how the block was not used here. I suspect a repair in the Caribbean in an emergency.
 

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Jul 2, 2019
97
Hunter 310 Pine Beach, NJ
Here's my inboard end cap showing 4 cam cleats. I use one only for topping lift. The rest just dangle but available for an emergency repair or other unexpected situation.
 

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Jul 2, 2019
97
Hunter 310 Pine Beach, NJ
At this point, I decided to relocate the pad-eye that secures the fixed block. This to reduce chafing or fouling. The original holes were filled with Life Caulk. Note how I left one screw removed to make it easier to attach the block.
 

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Jul 2, 2019
97
Hunter 310 Pine Beach, NJ
The assembly now gets fed into the boom. I bound the rope tight to the block to help keep it in place. Don't forget to unbind it before it disappears! Hook the block shackle over the padeye. Now you can insert the second pad-eye screw and tighten them (not shown).
 

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Jul 2, 2019
97
Hunter 310 Pine Beach, NJ
A "fish hook" helped to route lines around an almost blind section of the end cap. Piece of cake with the cap off the boom. A nightmare if it was attached.
 

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Jul 2, 2019
97
Hunter 310 Pine Beach, NJ
A tip: This stuff makes fishing a rope with a messenger so easy. Instead of sewing end to end, I use this wire sleeving. Insert rope and messenger and sew through it. Very strong and no chance of pulling apart leaving an "empty" messenger. Bought from McMaster Carr online. Other sources I'm sure.
 

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Jun 14, 2020
12
Hunter 310 Nepean Sailing Club, Ottawa
The assembly now gets fed into the boom. I bound the rope tight to the block to help keep it in place. Don't forget to unbind it before it disappears! Hook the block shackle over the padeye. Now you can insert the second pad-eye screw and tighten them (not shown).
@wdonovan thish is all awesome stuff. Thanks SO much for sharing. Question: how far inside you boom was the pad eye you removed one screw from? Yours looks like it was just inside the mast end of the boom. Mine is halfway down the boom. I also can't see anything on the outside of the boom that would fasten the block inside it, except three of these bales that hang from the bottom of the boom. (Pic attached.) The two bale screws are 2 3/4" apart from each other. I don't know if that would correspond to a pad eye or not. Any thoughts?
 

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Jul 2, 2019
97
Hunter 310 Pine Beach, NJ
@wdonovan thish is all awesome stuff. Thanks SO much for sharing. Question: how far inside you boom was the pad eye you removed one screw from? Yours looks like it was just inside the mast end of the boom. Mine is halfway down the boom. I also can't see anything on the outside of the boom that would fasten the block inside it, except three of these bales that hang from the bottom of the boom. (Pic attached.) The two bale screws are 2 3/4" apart from each other. I don't know if that would correspond to a pad eye or not. Any thoughts?
1st pic in post 8. Padeye is maybe 5" in from mast end. I don't know how yours was originally rigged. Mine had a padeye next to where I put the new one. I relocated it because I did not want it so close to the "floor" of the boom so I raised it a bit. This way the block is not cocked and there is room underneath for other ropes to pass freely without them binding on the block. No reason not to put the new padeye near the end. You want access to it. If at mid-boom I can't imagine rigging the hardware. I would avoid putting a padeye on the floor of the boom as rope may lay on sharp screw ends and chafe but that's just my own preference. As an engineer and being heavily involved with forensic failure investigation, I take an "If it can happen, it will happen" approach and try to anticipate everything.
 
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