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New Genoa Opinion

Dec 5, 2015
108
Oday 272LE Louisville, KY
I am considering purchasing a new 135% headsail for my O'Day 272LE. I only cruise around on a local river and do not race. What are your opinions on Challenge D4.93 High Modus Dacron sail fabric? This fabric is a little lighter than the 6oz OEM dacron. The wind is often light in my area.
 
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Likes: jssailem
Feb 21, 2013
3,774
Hunter 46 Point Richmond, CA
Ditto Brokenarm...................according to Challenge Sail Cloth, 4.93 Low Aspect High Modulus Dacron sail fabric for a jib is limited to 15-20 ft boats per the chart below. You can select the appropriate sail cloth for your boat in the following link OR confirm with your sail maker based on your wind conditions and reefing requirements.


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Jun 25, 2004
1,108
Corsair F24 Mk1 003 San Francisco Bay, CA
Loads on a sail and rig are determined by the "stiffness" (righting moment) of the boat, not by wind speed. If you heel the boat to 30 degrees in a gust, the load on the sails and rig is the same whether the wind is blowing 8 kts or 30 kts.

An Oday 27 is a 7000 pound boat with a lot of ballast. It's a stiff boat, with a high maximum righting moment.

4.93 (4.7 smoz) is not the right dacron for a furling 135 for a stiff keel boat that weighs 7000 pounds. It will stretch out quickly in winds that can push the boat to hull speed. 4.93 would be okay for a 135% genoa on a 2000 pound 20 footer, but not for a 7000 pound keelboat.

5.53 would be the lightest weight I'd recommend for a light to medium duty #2 135%. 6.53 dacron would be better for an all-purpose furling 135%, that can be furled to the size of a #3 working jib.

Judy B
retired sailmaker
 
Dec 5, 2015
108
Oday 272LE Louisville, KY
Thanks folks! I am going to pass on the lightweight sail and stick with 6oz dacron.
 

CarlN

.
Jan 4, 2009
577
Ketch 55 Bristol, RI
The primary reason to go with a higher quality cloth is not to save weight but to have a sail that keeps its shape better and longer. A blown out genoa robs you of upwind speed and increases healing. Something that is as important when cruising as it is racing. OEM sailcloth decisions are made on price not quality. No one can tell at a boatshow how good the sails are. Here's an excellent piece by Mack Sails. If you want your boat to sail better, I'd at least get a quote from them. http://macksails.com/sail-cloth/
 
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