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Names for Thing Anchoring

Mar 26, 2011
2,910
Corsair F-24 MK I Deale, MD
There were several long threads on a UK forum the other day about a few things we couldn't decide what were called.

The weight you place on a rode to hold it down. Chum is an old trade name. Angel, kellet (my favorite, because it can't refer to anything else), and Rider (also trade name) are also common, but none seem to be found in any widely accepted dictionary.

Kedge. The dictionaries list this either as a verb or as the anchor you use to do the verb (move the boat). But many seem to use it as a stylish alternative to "anchor" or "bower" (which is you main anchor). Or they use it to mean their storm anchor, which is just wrong, because a kedge is generally smaller. It is often a different type (alloy pivoting fluke).

Rode. Is it the connection between the boat and the anchor (or mooring or drogue), or does it signify a rope rode, as opposed to a chain rode? I've read many arguments. I like the first one, because otherwise, we have no generic term for that function; for example, we can refer to a shroud without specifying whether it is metal or synthetic).

I published a book on anchoring a while back, and I settled on using a glossary so that I could use terms consistently through sometimes complex discussions.

And any term you would like to add because you find it vague or used in conflicting ways!
 
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Nov 8, 2010
11,385
Beneteau First 36.7 & 260 Minneapolis MN & Bayfield WI
Kellet, but pronounced like it spells. Why on earth add more confusion. We also use a 2nd one on the RC boat rode about 12 feet out from the bow to keep everything clear of starting or finishing keels!
 
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Nov 8, 2010
11,385
Beneteau First 36.7 & 260 Minneapolis MN & Bayfield WI
Kellet, but pronounced like it spells. Why on earth add more confusion. We also use a 2nd one on the RC boat rode about 12 feet out from the bow to keep everything clear of starting or finishing keels!
Chain, rope, mixed. It’s all rode.
 
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dLj

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Mar 23, 2017
1,770
Belliure 41 Snug Harbor, Lake Champlain
Well, I am currently up North so I don't have access to my library. I don't know if I'll have time to look these things up before leaving for a 1 week work trip, too bad. I have some old books on nautical terms where I'd like to see if they mention these terms, but I will look at least when I return if not before.

In any case, here's my two cents worth.

I like kellet as the term for a weight used to run down a line to hold it for various reasons.

Kedge to me should be exclusively a verb. To kedge off a sand bar, or the like. I might be using a kedging anchor. I may have an anchor dedicated to kedging. You get the idea....

Rode - any type of line or chain used to keep a boat stationary. I completely agree with Jackdaw. An anchor rode, rode to tie boats together to make a floating party platform :beer: etc.

dj
 
Aug 22, 2017
1,608
Hunter 26.5 West Palm Beach
A Brit that I used to race with called it an angel. The Aussies I have sailed with call it a chum weight. I also hear it called Sentinel, Kellet, deck denter & foot breaker.
 
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Mar 26, 2011
2,910
Corsair F-24 MK I Deale, MD
We
Chain, rope, mixed. It’s all rode.
Websters says:
rode
noun
\ ˈrōd
\
Definition of rode (Entry 2 of 2)
: a line (as of rope or chain) used to attach an anchor to a boat

Oxford says:
noun
North American Nautical.
Origin,
early 17th century of unknown origin.
  • A rope, especially one securing an anchor or trawl.

    ‘Some would advise using four anchors two on each rode, with the rodes spread out in a Y.’
    ‘How many boats have anchor rodes strong enough to take such a loading?’
... But why would I accept Oxford's interpretation of American usage in preference to Websters?
 
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Jan 22, 2008
8,050
Beneteau 323 Annapolis MD
... Kedge to me should be exclusively a verb. To kedge off a sand bar, or the like. I might be using a kedging anchor. I may have an anchor dedicated to kedging. You get the idea....An anchor rode, rode to tie boats together to make a floating party platform ...
Or, as in that old folks song when Michael was going to the beach, his sailboat lacking oars, "Michael, kedged , not rowed, the boat ashore to the sand and used a kellet to secure it". I think that's the way my band sang it?
 
Nov 8, 2010
11,385
Beneteau First 36.7 & 260 Minneapolis MN & Bayfield WI
We

Websters says:
rode
noun
\ ˈrōd
\
Definition of rode (Entry 2 of 2)
: a line (as of rope or chain) used to attach an anchor to a boat

Oxford says:
noun
North American Nautical.
Origin,
early 17th century of unknown origin.
  • A rope, especially one securing an anchor or trawl.

    ‘Some would advise using four anchors two on each rode, with the rodes spread out in a Y.’
    ‘How many boats have anchor rodes strong enough to take such a loading?’
... But why would I accept Oxford's interpretation of American usage in preference to Websters?
I would suggest that the Oxford’s use of the term ‘rope’ is unintentionally over-descriptive. Do you think the 2nd example was supposed to not include boats secured by chain?
 
Oct 19, 2017
6,861
O'Day 19 Littleton, NH
How about rope vs line. A rope is any unassigned cordage, while a line has a job to do. The bell rope is an exception. But a boat has an undetermined number of ropes and lines.

-Will (Dragonfly)
 
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LloydB

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Jan 15, 2006
528
Macgregor 22 Silverton
From the first time that I started reading this website I found out there are magic sailor words everybody knows that are rarely found in a regular dictionary. Next week rode will probably be changed to WRL.
 
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Jan 19, 2010
9,920
Hunter 26 Charleston
I think the weight you send down a rode to hold it down is called a sentinel
 
Mar 26, 2011
2,910
Corsair F-24 MK I Deale, MD
I think the weight you send down a rode to hold it down is called a sentinel
Yup, I forgot to list that one. But again, sentinel, like angel, has another meaning.
-----
Anyone on this thread actually use one? With chain I feel they are basically useless; just deploy another 15-25 feet of chain and you have done more, far more easily. With rope I can see the purpose. If I need one (very rare) I use loops of chain, since they are easy to deal with and there is no way it can chafe the rope. https://www.practical-sailor.com/issues/45_5/features/Assessing-the-Anchor-Kellet_12594-1.html
 

dLj

.
Mar 23, 2017
1,770
Belliure 41 Snug Harbor, Lake Champlain
I don't use them when anchoring. I do use them when tied to a wall where there are large tidal changes. I'll set my long bow and stern lines so they are the correct length for the tidal shift and then will set the kellet on the stern line such that as the tide changes my access to typically the vertical ladder up the wall remains in the same position.

dj
 
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Nov 8, 2010
11,385
Beneteau First 36.7 & 260 Minneapolis MN & Bayfield WI
I got the last image from SA, so I'm not sure it can be trusted.

-Will (Dragonfly)
As a rule, the information and opinions found on SA are about 5x more reliable than a post here. Partially because incorrect info is quickly squashed.
 
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Nov 8, 2010
11,385
Beneteau First 36.7 & 260 Minneapolis MN & Bayfield WI
I don't use them when anchoring. I do use them when tied to a wall where there are large tidal changes. I'll set my long bow and stern lines so they are the correct length for the tidal shift and then will set the kellet on the stern line such that as the tide changes my access to typically the vertical ladder up the wall remains in the same position.

dj
Clever. I assume this works OK as long as there is not too much current or wind?