• On September 1st, Maine Sail suffered a major hemorrhagic stroke. One of the most generous members of our sailing community, he has helped thousands. Now it's our turn. Click here to learn more

Insight on sail condition

Jul 6, 2013
172
Catalina 30TR, Atomic 4 2480 Milwaukee
Well, true ... you can make it as easy as you like if you ignore all the options made by the full variety of sailmakers in cloth and cut. :cool: I'm just suggesting that there is way more to it than that if you really want to make the decisions yourself rather than just farm it out to CD to select the builder's standard made by Ullman for you. The builder's standard is probably good enough for 95% of the sailors. I would recommend looking at the Ullman website to see my point. CD appears to offer the standard dacron cross-cut sail, which is fine depending upon your interest, or lack of interest in the sails.
I agree that you could make it very complicated. But I wouldn’t recommend that path for a beginner sailor who needs sails right away, as is the case with the OP.
Full disclosure: I have an Ullman mainsail bought thru CD on my C30. It’s a huge performance improvement over the tired old sail I had before. And after 3 seasons, it still has that awesome crinkle sound of a new sail when we hoist it. I must be in the 95%.
 
  • Like
Likes: Scott T-Bird

Joe

.
Jun 1, 2004
7,451
Catalina 27 Mission Bay, San Diego
Well it worked just fine for me....:beer:
Not intended, in any way, to suggest it won't work. I apologize. Perhaps I should have titled the post "here's another good way to rig a jib downhaul."
Anyway, if you simply move the downhaul to the next lower hank it will work way, way better than fine. Because you won't have to worry about the headboard being flopped over because of slack in the halyard. Easy to try, easy to go back to original. Just sayin'
 
Last edited:

Joe

.
Jun 1, 2004
7,451
Catalina 27 Mission Bay, San Diego
Why not ? I know many folks who singlehand with this setup
Perhaps the post title was misleading. I didn't want to say "don't rig a jib downhaul", I just meant to suggest a couple of small improvement changes that have worked for me the past 20 years. 1. tie dh line to first hank below headboard. 2. no need to interlace line 3. use small diam. line 5/32 or 1/8..... but, by all means, a jib downhaul.....like a tiller pilot.... will make your single handing experience vastly better.
 
Last edited:
  • Like
Likes: Ward H
Jan 19, 2010
10,002
Hunter 26 Charleston
Perhaps the post title was misleading. I didn't want to say "don't rig a jib downhaul", I just meant to suggest a couple of small improvement changes that have worked for me the past 20 years. 1. tie dh line to first hank below headboard. 2. no need to interlace line 3. use small diam. line 5/32 or 1/8..... but, by all means, a jib downhaul.....like a tiller pilot.... will make your single handing experience vastly better.
I agree on the 1/8th" line. I also used a light line.

Here is another trick I have used when dropping the genoa in a blow. First is to rig your storm jib with a small permanant pendant. Then when it is time to swith out the Genoa for the storm jib... head up into the wind, pull the jib sheet rather tight and then release the jib halyard while pulling on the down haul on the winch. The Genoa will accordian fold right up agains the gunwale and sit there nice and still. I then can go forward in relative calm and hank the storm jib over the top of the genoa hanks without removing the genoa hanks from the forestay. The pendant will reach the bow stem's chainplate and also provide a little gap between the jib's foot and the deck... which helps keep water off of the jib when beating to windward.
 
  • Helpful
Likes: kappykaplan