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Insight on sail condition

DonP1

.
Oct 8, 2021
2
Catalina 22 Cheney Lake
I am looking at purchasing a 1984 Catalina 22 which I looked at earlier today and everything about the boat was immaculate, given the year, aside from the sails. The current owner is the third owner of the boat and said he believes that all three sails are original to the boat by his guess and I was wondering if they were in need of refitting or replacement. I know the picture isn't the greatest. however, there was not even the slightest breeze today so I could not get a picture of them filled.
Boat.jpg
 
May 17, 2004
3,474
Beneteau Oceanis 37 LE Havre de Grace
If they’re original from 1984 it’s pretty unlikely that they’re in any kind of shape for performance sailing. The wrinkles from the clew in the picture backs that up - it looks like there’s some amount of stretch going on. Depending on how they were handled they might be usable enough to casually sail around or learn with, but they’ll likely give more heeling and more weather helm than a newer set.
 
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Nov 6, 2006
9,225
Hunter 34 Mandeville Louisiana
Yup, they look good enough to learn with and sharpen your sail trim controls. Also to learn how to handle and store them.. Then get a new shiny set after a year or so of using the originals.
Welcome aboard!
 
Jan 11, 2014
7,839
Sabre 362 113 Fair Haven, NY
Sails approaching their 40th birthday are long past their prime if they have been used much at all.

The sooner the sails are replaced, the happier you will be. Old, tired, stretched out sails are impossible to trim correctly and usually induce too much heel.

When I can see daylight through the stitching holes, then I know it is time to call the sail maker.

An interim solution might be used sails that are in better condition. I think there is a Catalina 22 Association which would be a good source. Sailors who are serious about racing will frequently replace sails which leaves their significant others complaining about all the sail bags in the garage.
 
Feb 21, 2013
3,779
Hunter 46 Point Richmond, CA
Welcome to the forum!!

Yep ........go sail with the existing sails, and when you are ready, buy new ones.
 
Oct 24, 2010
2,399
Hunter 30 Everett, WA
When I finally pulled the trigger on new sails I went with this site right here (Sailboatowners.com) and they did me right.
Prices were competitive and the sails were good (Doyle). It made it way easier to trim the sails.

Ken
 

Joe

.
Jun 1, 2004
7,452
Catalina 27 Mission Bay, San Diego
If that's the only thing holding you back then go for it. Replace the sails as your budget allows. You can enjoy the boat now, even with old sails.
 
Oct 26, 2008
5,015
Catalina 320 Barnegat, NJ
Buy new sails for that boat. She looks like she deserves them. Put your fenders away, she deserves that, too! ;):cool:
 
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Likes: rgranger
May 25, 2012
3,844
john alden caravelle 42 sturgeon bay, wis
those sails are totally blown out in the picture. not sorta blown out.

your V8 engine is running on one cylinder.

they were shot many seasons ago

i'm more blunt then most, welcome to the forum

jon
 
Jul 6, 2013
172
Catalina 30TR, Atomic 4 2480 Milwaukee
Maybe you can use the condition of the sails as a negotiating point. But also consider whether you could ever find another boat in this condition. If this is ”your boat,” then go for it.
 
Oct 26, 2008
5,015
Catalina 320 Barnegat, NJ
Welcome to the world of sailing! Having new sails made isn't as easy as it may seem! You will find that the options are nearly endless and the information you will have to sort thru can boggle the mind! Good luck!
 
Jul 6, 2013
172
Catalina 30TR, Atomic 4 2480 Milwaukee
Welcome to the world of sailing! Having new sails made isn't as easy as it may seem! You will find that the options are nearly endless and the information you will have to sort thru can boggle the mind! Good luck!
Sails for a C-22 will be easy . You can buy them from Catalina Direct. And most sailmakers would have the patterns.
 
Jan 19, 2010
10,002
Hunter 26 Charleston
Pay the little bit extra for the second set of reef points.

It looks like you have a hanked on head sail. I like hanked on head sails and rigging them with a simple down haul will make your sail changing a LOT easier....(see pic) Also snoop around Bacon Sails for a used (but still in good shape) head sail and then maybe a 75 head sail for when you have a reef or two in your main. Rig your main so you can reef from the cockpit and run the headsail's down haul back to the cockpit. Then it would go like this... wind pipes up to about 12 to 15 and you put the first reef in the main. Wind pipes up to about 18-20 and you drop the headsail and bend on the 75%. This will keep the helm balanced and the boat moving forward instead of heeling. It will be a lot more comfortable if you slice through the waves with some power rather than being thrown over the wave.... if the wind gets to 20+ you might need the second reef in the main and if things get narly (like getting caught out in sudden blow.. you drop the main and make your way with the 75% only.

At least that is how it went with a Mac 22 I used to own. When the wind is really blowing, some boats do better with a double reefed main and no head sail and others handle better with just the headsail. You will have to feel out your own boat.
1633907713727.png



jiffy-reef-setup.jpg
 

Joe

.
Jun 1, 2004
7,452
Catalina 27 Mission Bay, San Diego
View attachment 199170


Do not rig your jib downhaul like this picture.

First: The connection should be to the second hank from top, not the top one/headboard. Why? Because connecting the downhaul to the top, next to the halyard will cause a foldover, jamming it up. The second or even third hank will include the luff in the downhaul action.... works perfectly.
Second: The downhaul line doesn't need to be interwoven around, or threaded through the hanks. A free line will minimize friction. Simply adjust its tension to pull out the slack.
Finally: Use small diameter line. My downhaul is 1/8" dacron.... There is very little load on this line.... it's purpose is to control the drop of the sail so you don't have to go forward to lower it. My routine is to hold the halyard in one hand, the downhaul in the other and steer with the tiller between my knees, allowing me to steer the boat under the sail as it comes down neatly on the foredeck. Cleating off the downhaul will keep the headsail under control as you proceed towards your destination.
 
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Likes: Ward H
Oct 26, 2008
5,015
Catalina 320 Barnegat, NJ
Sails for a C-22 will be easy . You can buy them from Catalina Direct. And most sailmakers would have the patterns.
Well, true ... you can make it as easy as you like if you ignore all the options made by the full variety of sailmakers in cloth and cut. :cool: I'm just suggesting that there is way more to it than that if you really want to make the decisions yourself rather than just farm it out to CD to select the builder's standard made by Ullman for you. The builder's standard is probably good enough for 95% of the sailors. I would recommend looking at the Ullman website to see my point. CD appears to offer the standard dacron cross-cut sail, which is fine depending upon your interest, or lack of interest in the sails.