Injector pump

Pdb316

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Nov 8, 2021
1
Bristol 40 Kentucky Lake
I have bled the fuel up through both bleeder valves of the injector pump. With cranking the engine to actuate the injection motor, I just get a drop or 2 of fuel at the injector. What can I do next to find why fuel is not being pumped to the injectors
 
Feb 10, 2004
3,520
Hunter 40.5 Warwick, RI
Listed below in order of ease of checking-
No/low fuel in tank
Plugged filter(s)
Defective lift pump
Air leak anywhere in the fuel path

Air leaks are tough. I once installed a brand new generator and it was a self-bleeding system. I could not get that beast to start to save my soul. A friend came over to help and found a hose clamp on the input or output of the lift pump that was not as tight as it should be. He tightened the clamp and started the engine.
Yes, I felt stupid....
 
Sep 25, 2008
6,348
Alden 50 Sarasota, Florida
I have bled the fuel up through both bleeder valves of the injector pump. With cranking the engine to actuate the injection motor, I just get a drop or 2 of fuel at the injector. What can I do next to find why fuel is not being pumped to the injectors
Just to be clear, did you crack any of the injectors and is that where you "get a drop or two? If so, that would indicate fuel is getting to the cylinders although not sufficient to start. One or two drops indicates insufficient fuel flow as it should squirt out. The only way to determine if there is sufficient flow is open up an injector in a bowl and then crank.
Start by checking everything for air leaks as suggested above.
 
May 24, 2004
6,838
CC 30 South Florida
Check the obvious but I had an incident once where the injector pump in a boat that had been laid up got stuck by either a little rust or fuel gunk. At the time I had looked at rebuilding it but was advised by a Yanmar shop manager that rebuilding them was an iffy proposition and that he recommended just installing a new one. Before deciding to order a new one, I had immersed the pump in clean diesel fuel and started manipulating it manually and it finally released and seemed to operate smoothly. I installed back into the engine and it started and ran well for years to come. There was a lot of water in the fuel tank, more than would have allowed the engine to start and for that reason I suspect a little rust may have developed internally. I removed as much water as I could with the water separator and mixed in clean new fuel and once the engine started I then had the fuel polished.