Does anyone know what the 36 was designed for?

Alctel

.
Dec 13, 2013
263
Hunter 36 Victoria
The 36' cherubini hunters seem to be a bit of an odd ball out of the whole series - only made for 2 years and they don't really seem to have a niche like the other models do (37' is a designed-for bluewater boat, the 25/27 designed to be great trailer sailers etc etc). It's lighter than the 37' by over 3000lbs and doesn't have the cutter rig, but also has no quarter berths meaning it's not designed for charter or anything like that. Does anyone have the design spec for the boat?

I've got one and I can get her to move decently in anything over 3 knots of wind with new sails for upwind and a symmetrical spinny for downwind and she's really easy to sail - I'd love the cutter rig though of the 37 and I actually prefer the layout of the 37s as well (I recently rafted up to one and got to poke around a bit).
 
Aug 10, 2010
58
Hunter 36, Quarter Berth Model Placid Harbor, Cuckold Crk, Patuxent River
From my understanding, the 36 was a stretched 33. So Cherubini may not have designed the 36 per se, but he did design the 33 and Hunter just stretched it a bit for more room, etc. At least that is what I garnered after reading various posts and random articles, but I have nothing to reference for certain. Ours is an '82 model (with quarter berth) and has held up well enough to keep me enjoying it. It's been from the Chesapeake Bay up to Rhode Island and down to Florida (where my folks kept her for 16 years or so) and they took it over to Bahamas a few times. We had it trucked back up to Maryland in 2009 and now my wife and I enjoy sailing her. Probably won't see as many far adventures, but a DelMarVa cruise would be nice to do sometime soon. New sails and new motor, AC and fridge - she moves Ok for us and it works well for the Chesapeake area.
 
May 24, 2004
6,838
CC 30 South Florida
Hunters are production boats designed for leisure boating. They come in different sizes to accommodate different desires for comfort. A boat designed for blue-water cruising usually has a very small cockpit to minimize the effects of swamping, sturdy small portholes, outboard stanchions, full keel, large capacity fresh water tanks, large capacity fuel tanks and a hull shape designed for easy sea motion. Although the larger Hunter models are capable of offshore cruising with a few modifications none were designed for blue water cruising.
 
Jan 22, 2008
110
Hunter 36_1980 Bass River, NJ
my 1980 hunter 36 is hull # 30. At the time I bought 2003, there was a some articles I was able to dig out of
various websites that existed at the time. From what I read as to researching the 36 was that
yes it was a longer version of the 33. Also that the recession of 1980 to about 1982 crushed the sales of this model and some others at Hunter. I do not know how many hulls were built, but due to poor sales, some of these hulls were sold as kit boats, finish it yourself. This was some of the info. I had found.
My sailboat was built for a gentleman in Maryland who took del. at Harve DeGrace Hunter dealer in Maryland. I am the 3rd owner. My 36 is a very solid built sailboat, sails well and is very responsive. Interior is comfortable and the workmanship was done well. No regrets on this purchase. I have sailed her on the Chesapeake for 6 years before sailing her closer to home here in Southern NJ. Sail the ocean coastal areas of Atlantic City and Cape May and inland the Great Bay areas.
 
Jun 8, 2004
915
C&C Frigate 36 St. Margarets Bay, Nova Scotia
Hunters are production boats designed for leisure boating. They come in different sizes to accommodate different desires for comfort. A boat designed for blue-water cruising usually has a very small cockpit to minimize the effects of swamping, sturdy small portholes, outboard stanchions, full keel, large capacity fresh water tanks, large capacity fuel tanks and a hull shape designed for easy sea motion. Although the larger Hunter models are capable of offshore cruising with a few modifications none were designed for blue water cruising.
That's your opinion posing as fact. Another opinion from 1982 Hunter literature: "The Hunter 37 has proven herself a capable bluewater cruiser...[and] is ready to carry you away to those distant ports in complete convenience and comfort." The facts are that of the 400+ Hunter 37 Cutters built, significant numbers have been cruised bluewater and today examples are found in Argentina, Australia, Bahamas, Belgium, Belize, Canada, Great Britain, Scotland, and Uruguay, in addition to the US (including Hawaii and Alaska). These are indeed production boats, some with upgrades, out there on the oceans. Sounds like bluewater cruising to me. Many of the characteristics you cite - super small cockpit, full keel, outboard stanchions - are out-of-date design criteria. My Hunter has generous tankage (100 gal water, 38 gal diesel), heavy displacement for a modern boat (20,000 lb) and an easy sea motion. The equipment fitted was generally the best quality at the time (e.g. Bomar cast aluminum hatches, Kenyon heavy section cruising spar, Edson steering, etc. Just because the Cherubini-designed Hunters were built to a price point doesn't disqualify all the models from being bluewater capable. End of rant.

P.S. I met a local sailor who made several offshore passages from eastern Canada to the Caribbean in his stock Hunter 36 boat, so its not just the 37 Cutter that goes bluewater.
 
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Alctel

.
Dec 13, 2013
263
Hunter 36 Victoria
Hunters are production boats designed for leisure boating. They come in different sizes to accommodate different desires for comfort. A boat designed for blue-water cruising usually has a very small cockpit to minimize the effects of swamping, sturdy small portholes, outboard stanchions, full keel, large capacity fresh water tanks, large capacity fuel tanks and a hull shape designed for easy sea motion. Although the larger Hunter models are capable of offshore cruising with a few modifications none were designed for blue water cruising.
Well that's the thing - the 36 has a tiny cockpit (really too small tbh), big water tanks, a great hull shape (i've made headway into 6' steep chop and 25 knots), high ballast to weight ratio and outboard stanchions but the 37 has all that and the cutter rig and is a bit heavier - so I'm not sure what the impetus for the 36 was.

Oh and the 37 was designed as a 'go anywhere blue water boat' and as already mentioned they are all over the place.

my 1980 hunter 36 is hull # 30. At the time I bought 2003, there was a some articles I was able to dig out of
various websites that existed at the time. From what I read as to researching the 36 was that
yes it was a longer version of the 33. Also that the recession of 1980 to about 1982 crushed the sales of this model and some others at Hunter. I do not know how many hulls were built, but due to poor sales, some of these hulls were sold as kit boats, finish it yourself. This was some of the info. I had found.
My sailboat was built for a gentleman in Maryland who took del. at Harve DeGrace Hunter dealer in Maryland. I am the 3rd owner. My 36 is a very solid built sailboat, sails well and is very responsive. Interior is comfortable and the workmanship was done well. No regrets on this purchase. I have sailed her on the Chesapeake for 6 years before sailing her closer to home here in Southern NJ. Sail the ocean coastal areas of Atlantic City and Cape May and inland the Great Bay areas.
Thanks for the info Joe - where did you find it? I didn't realise some were sold as kit boats. Mine had a luhrs sticker on the inside so I am guessing that's who built it - being a 1980 model I guess it was one of the first from the factory.

I'm sailing mine down to San Fran from Victoria in a month so we'll see how it goes.
 
Jun 21, 2007
2,093
Hunter Cherubini 36_80-82 Sausalito / San Francisco Bay
I'll wager that you will actually make it to San Francisco!