Correct way to secure main and jib sheets?

duck21

.
Jul 17, 2020
78
Hunter 376 Washburn, WI on Lake Superior
I've found the same as Ed--on both the Catalina and the Hunter we rarely used the sheet to manage puffs. Even if the sheet were wrapped around the winch it wouldn't be accessible from behind the wheel (on both the Catalina and our 376 the main traveler is on the deck in front of the companion way). Even with autopilot scootching around the wheel and up to the sheet would take too long to effectively use the sheet to manage puffs. We usually manage variable winds via steering as well.

When we were looking at boats we did see some that have the main traveler/sheet more accessible on the cockpit (a Tartan 31 comes to mind). In that case it does make sense to me that one would more proactively manage puffy wind using the sheet vs pointing the bow.
 
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Joe

.
Jun 1, 2004
7,452
Catalina 27 Mission Bay, San Diego
So..... this 34 ft boat only has two winches? And they are located a distance from the helm , next to the companionway, with a big pile of line to deal with every time the boat changes direction. Is there a halyard winch.... or is everything furling? whew.... is it possible for the driver to make a turn on his own, or does a crew need to stand up there also.
 

duck21

.
Jul 17, 2020
78
Hunter 376 Washburn, WI on Lake Superior
On the 340 I believe the same two winches serve the halyard. Sail order goes:

Raise main, lock halyard and remove line from winch, unfurl jib, sheet jib on winch.

You are correct that, with out an autopilot it is more difficult to tack with out crew. Before I had an autopilot on my Catalina I would tack, tighten the wheel brake, then move the sheets (I should note, this was the case with th Catalina despite the jib sheets and winches actually being adjacent to the wheel).

With autopilot I will often use the "tack" button or hit the +10 button a couple of times to let the boat move itself through the wind while I am forward of the wheel moving the sheets.

This is probably all pretty inefficient in terms of speed, but if one isn't racing there usually isn't a need for extremely fast movements in the moment. Especially on the Hunters where the main is the more powerful sail.

If one was racing I assume you'd usually have crew anyway, regardless of winch/sheet position.
 
Feb 21, 2013
3,779
Hunter 46 Point Richmond, CA
To add to post #2......jib and and mainsail sheets secured on a winch cleat with the mainsail clutch in the open position ready to release. Halyards, boom vang, mainsail continous furing lines secured by a clutch. Head sail furling line and topping lift cleated off on a horn cleat.
 
Jul 29, 2004
396
Hunter 340 Lake Lanier, GA
So..... this 34 ft boat only has two winches? And they are located a distance from the helm , next to the companionway, with a big pile of line to deal with every time the boat changes direction. Is there a halyard winch.... or is everything furling? whew.... is it possible for the driver to make a turn on his own, or does a crew need to stand up there also.
Yes, 2 cabintop winches, ST30 to port for jib halyard, spin halyard and topping lift, ST 40 to starboard for mainsheet, main halyard and reefing. Two more ST30s on coamings for spin sheets. Cabin top winches are about 8 ft in front of the wheel. No "big pile of line", Hunter provided line storage areas for jib sheets, and I have line bags for the rest. Furling jib, conventional main.

Sail is ready for second reef, but not rigged. If I think I might need it, I rig second reef at the dock.

No autopilot here, when single handing this boat, I’ll start a slow turn, move to the sheet winches to move them, and reach back to the wheel to straighten out on new course before fine tuning the jib sheets.

Duck also described it well, we're cruising not racing but I can still tack my boat quickly.

Learn your boat, it's good and bad features, work around the bad and take advantage of the good (ALL boats have compromises in design and setup). I'm very happy with mine!