Cleats

May 24, 2004
6,796
CC 30 South Florida
Don't know if you have a backing plate or just washers behind that small cleat. Can you feel behind it? Is there space behind it to add flat washers and nuts? I have dealt with stressed cleats due to shock and overload and find that the weakest link in them are the bolts which will overstretch and bend. Now these bolts are usually thin enough to break before the backing plate is ripped off. I would surmise you are installing a larger cleat merely to be able to use a larger diameter line and not necessarily because you intend to increase the loads. I would try to avoid having to increase the diameter of the bolts too much. I would center the new cleat and mark where new holes are to be drilled. Make sure the diameter of the new holes does not overlap or be too close to the old holes. You may drill smaller pilot holes just to feel for the boundaries of a backing plate if it is there. In any instance, whether a plate or not I would add as large as possible flat washers to backup the new nuts and smaller locking washers. Match the hole in the washer to the size of the bolt being used. You could also offset the new cleat by using one of the existing holes and just having to drill one new one. In any instance fill up the old holes with epoxy and a dab of gelcoat. I'm sure you know to apply and drill through some masking tape to avoid cracks in the gel coat.
 
Aug 26, 2019
41
Hunter 260 Eau Claire
Hi Dave thanks for responding, I have a 1999 260. the anchor locker extends back behind from where the cleat is. I cannot visually see the backing plate because it is behind a void area. I was wondering how big the plate actually is?
 
Aug 26, 2019
41
Hunter 260 Eau Claire
Don't know if you have a backing plate or just washers behind that small cleat. Can you feel behind it? Is there space behind it to add flat washers and nuts? I have dealt with stressed cleats due to shock and overload and find that the weakest link in them are the bolts which will overstretch and bend. Now these bolts are usually thin enough to break before the backing plate is ripped off. I would surmise you are installing a larger cleat merely to be able to use a larger diameter line and not necessarily because you intend to increase the loads. I would try to avoid having to increase the diameter of the bolts too much. I would center the new cleat and mark where new holes are to be drilled. Make sure the diameter of the new holes does not overlap or be too close to the old holes. You may drill smaller pilot holes just to feel for the boundaries of a backing plate if it is there. In any instance, whether a plate or not I would add as large as possible flat washers to backup the new nuts and smaller locking washers. Match the hole in the washer to the size of the bolt being used. You could also offset the new cleat by using one of the existing holes and just having to drill one new one. In any instance fill up the old holes with epoxy and a dab of gelcoat. I'm sure you know to apply and drill through some masking tape to avoid cracks in the gel coat.
 
Aug 26, 2019
41
Hunter 260 Eau Claire
Thanks for the response Benny. I will probably use one hole then drill another as you said. I lost a boat (Mac26S) on the rocks while on a mooring. The cleats were the same as on my Hunter. They were the plastic ones and the horns broke off in a storm so I want to change them out as soon as I find out how big the backing plate actually is. I cannot actually see the plate because it is behind a void area in the
anchor locker.
 
Jun 8, 2004
8,893
-na -NA Anywhere USA
Under boat information/Hunter resources/260/downloads you will find the first document which contains backing plate areas. Where there are machine bolts penetrating the deck are backing plates.

To access the area, you will need to pull out the triangular piece in the V berth by unscrewing the stainless steel screws out. That piece is wedged in but it will come out so be careful and don’t say bull fiddle sticks. Then you can determine what to do.

It helped me when you identified your boat. While at it check your drain hose fittings and make sure the bow eye is tight. Check that bow eye support. If replacing it is in order, use a piece of long round metal tubing.

Hope this help and advise repairs. Thanks
 
Aug 26, 2019
41
Hunter 260 Eau Claire
Under boat information/Hunter resources/260/downloads you will find the first document which contains backing plate areas. Where there are machine bolts penetrating the deck are backing plates.

To access the area, you will need to pull out the triangular piece in the V berth by unscrewing the stainless steel screws out. That piece is wedged in but it will come out so be careful and don’t say bull fiddle sticks. Then you can determine what to do.

It helped me when you identified your boat. While at it check your drain hose fittings and make sure the bow eye is tight. Check that bow eye support. If replacing it is in order, use a piece of long round metal tubing.

Hope this help and advise repairs. Thanks
Hi Dave, I opened up the triangular panel as you said. The first hole for the cleat is 26 inches back from the bow, you really can't reach back that far and if you could Hunter has installed foam to fill the void area.
my next plan is maybe to cut an inspection hole where I think they are which is in the anchor locker where my finger is pointing in the pic I sent.
 

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May 24, 2004
6,796
CC 30 South Florida
One last thing before you start cutting. The backing plate may be threaded or the nuts may be imbedded with the plate. If that were the case it would mean you could reuse the bolts if you find a cleat with the same mounting holes pattern. I can understand how old and weathered plastic cleats can loose their integrity and be prone to failure but if they can be easily replaced by new ones those should have the adequate strength to hold the boat. Another option might be to install a larger metal cleat in the center of the deck, in a more accessible location where in foul weather you may tie your port and starboard lines to the center and just thread them and wrap them through the plastic ones.
 
Feb 18, 2011
290
Hunter 260 Cave Run Lake, KY
The backing plate document that Crazy Dave mentioned shows the sizes of the backing plates. On the 260 #18 plates for the bow cleats are 3x6 inches if that helps.
 
Aug 26, 2019
41
Hunter 260 Eau Claire
One last thing before you start cutting. The backing plate may be threaded or the nuts may be imbedded with the plate. If that were the case it would mean you could reuse the bolts if you find a cleat with the same mounting holes pattern. I can understand how old and weathered plastic cleats can loose their integrity and be prone to failure but if they can be easily replaced by new ones those should have the adequate strength to hold the boat. Another option might be to install a larger metal cleat in the center of the deck, in a more accessible location where in foul weather you may tie your port and starboard lines to the center and just thread them and wrap them through the plastic ones.
Great advice! Thanks for your responses Dave, I greatly appreciate it. Ill keep you posted
 
Aug 26, 2019
41
Hunter 260 Eau Claire
The backing plate document that Crazy Dave mentioned shows the sizes of the backing plates. On the 260 #18 plates for the bow cleats are 3x6 inches if that helps.
Caverun thanks for that info!!!! I have the diagram but was never able to determine the actual dimensions of the plate. I must have not looked at it closely. I saw #18 but missed the dimensions. 1000 thanks.
 
Jun 8, 2004
8,893
-na -NA Anywhere USA
For what it is worth, you will see foam forward. It is not structural but was added so the boat will not sink. You can remove it to access that area but later can apply foam back. It was a thought of mine to add the Foam so the boat would not sink. It was also a marketing tool for sales