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Broken Mast on my San Juan 7.7

RitSim

.
Jan 29, 2018
246
Beneteau 411 Branford
I have excerpted the steps on mast splicing from Sail magazine October 2019.
1 First you need two clean ends that butt correctly together and not less that 4 feet of interior extrusion for the splice.
2. The typical process is to remove the sail track sections of the repair extrusion. If the repair extrusion is an oval shape, you may be able to tighten the forward radius to allow it to slip inside. For a rectangular shape possibly split the splice longitudinally into two equal halves.
3. The better the fit - the better the repair. So trace out the extrusions and select the cut that will maximize internal contact.
4. Drill the mast with a pattern of holes avoiding any horizontal lines. Some splicers use a smaller drill and use screws to hold the splice in position and tightly against the mast interior. As the splice is in position, remove a screw if necessary and drill with the rivet size drill. Insert the rivet (largest you can handle)
5. Install the sleeve in one section first . Some add a thin layer of epoxy to perfect the surface to surface contact. Check the fit again. Radius the sail track at the splice location to avoid sail snags
6. Complete the splice in a similar manner.

All per Don Casey.

I would add that keeping the mast perfectly straight fore/aft and athwart is easy to overlook in the heat of the splicing detail battle.
 
Aug 1, 2011
3,959
Catalina 270 255 Wabamun. Welcome to the marina
I'd add a couple of points to Salavie's commentary. Both of us have "lived" for a significant amount of time on moorings, far, far away from the hoopla that appears to be the marina. In the last few weeks, we have personally witnessed a shocking amount of poor boat handling skills, boats being side swiped, backed into, and rammed. While most of these collisions are not serious, they should not be happening at all. I can speak for myself when I say that I had some trepidation about the non-discretionary requirement to put the boat in the slip as adversed to grabbing the ball, and after seeing some of the things that we've seen this year, that fear was totally unfounded. Some of these people should simply NOT be driving boats.
This year's Wabamun video review will contain a chapter on boat handling.
 
Sep 22, 2018
1,869
Hunter 216 Kingston
I'd add a couple of points to Salavie's commentary. Both of us have "lived" for a significant amount of time on moorings, far, far away from the hoopla that appears to be the marina. In the last few weeks, we have personally witnessed a shocking amount of poor boat handling skills, boats being side swiped, backed into, and rammed. While most of these collisions are not serious, they should not be happening at all. I can speak for myself when I say that I had some trepidation about the non-discretionary requirement to put the boat in the slip as adversed to grabbing the ball, and after seeing some of the things that we've seen this year, that fear was totally unfounded. Some of these people should simply NOT be driving boats.
This year's Wabamun video review will contain a chapter on boat handling.
The Canadian boat operator card focuses on safety and reducing accidents (and maybe it does) gives the right to operate the boat but has no requirement to have actually even been in a boat yet alone handle one. Anyone can get the card and drive!

Same holds true for a motorcycle license. A complete neophyte can get their beginner license, go to a bike shop and buy a “rocket” and go riding.

With autos you have to at least have an experienced driver with you as you learn.

IMHO I think the “beginner” should have to demonstrate their ability to safely handle a boat in tight quarters before they get sanctioned approval to crash :)
 
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Aug 1, 2011
3,959
Catalina 270 255 Wabamun. Welcome to the marina
The Canadian boat operator card focuses on safety and reducing accidents (and maybe it does) gives the right to operate the boat but has no requirement to have actually even been in a boat yet alone handle one. Anyone can get the card and drive!
The issue here is that there is -no- enforcement in the west. None, nada. In 25 years of being on and around these lakes, you see the rare appearance of a fish and wildlife officer, and you hear urban legends of these guys in parking lots looking for cards, but I can state assuredly that I have never been asked for the card, inspected or even observed by these guys. The "card", at least out here, doesn't mean a dang thing. It would appear that the oil crash has removed all the lifted, chipped, modified 1 tons pulling gooseneck triple axle trailers flying 130+ down the road, but hasn't yet caught up with the Moomba wake boats. (with apologies to Moomba)
 

CarlN

.
Jan 4, 2009
577
Ketch 55 Bristol, RI
The insurance company will insist on the repair being done “right” or they won't insure the rig going forward. They won't be impressed that some guys on the Internet said a sleeve would be OK. Unfortunately I think your season is over. Did you tell your insurance company that you wanted to fix it right now? That may be your problem. It’s in their financial interest to get the other company to pay 100% - that’s much better then taking $1500 from you and paying the rest themselves. But they don’t know up front how they’ll do. I’m pretty confident you won’t have to pay a deductible if they win but you won’t know for a few months. I’d call them up again and get a better understanding of your options and likely outcomes if you are willing to wait a while. Going after the other company yourself without hiring a lawyer is essentially hopeless.
 
Last edited:
Jul 15, 2020
15
San juan 7.7 Edmonton
The insurance company will insist on the repair being done “right” or they won't insure the rig going forward. They won't be impressed that some guys on the Internet said a sleeve would be OK. Unfortunately I think your season is over. Did you tell your insurance company that you wanted to fix it right now? That may be your problem. It’s in their financial interest to get the other company to pay 100% - that’s much better then taking $1500 from you and paying the rest themselves. But they don’t know up front how they’ll do. I’m pretty confident you won’t have to pay a deductible if they win but you won’t know for a few months. I’d call them up again and get a better understanding of your options and likely outcomes if you are willing to wait a while. Going after the other company yourself without hiring a lawyer is essentially hopeless.
I have to wait for an appraiser to contact me. I know my season is over.
 
Apr 8, 2010
1,622
Ericson Yachts Olson 34 28400 Portland OR
This sad situation also brings up a financial issue common to all older boats. The replacement cost of their "main engine" (spars/rig/sails) is usually more than the retail value of their used boat.
Sailors are not special in this respect, either.
Equally true for those hundreds of thousands of owners of inboard powerboats built in the 70's and 80's - and even newer. And double down on the cost hit for any stern drive setup.

Insurance valuation assumes an average boat, on a slowly declining "market value" sloping graph.
The small % of owners that Fully Maintain their boat really have to choose their insurer carefully, forcefully insist on an "agreed value" policy, and be prepared to pay a bit more "per thousand" which is how insurance seems to be valued/sold.

While it's really nice to own a maintained-like-new boat, only about 5 to 10% (at most) of owners love the lifestyle enough to invest their time and energy to that extent. I see a sorta-kinda similarity to those who restore small aircraft and 'vintage' cars (and Airstream trailers!) as well. :)

Last season I watched a friends 70K (approx. market value) sailboat get an extensive repair done after striking a reef while on vacation. Work was done in a well regarded yard, over many months, and the cost to the insurer was just shy of what would have totaled their boat. The boat meets my friend's needs perfectly and they were happy not to have to try and find another one. :cool:

I do hope that the OP does get his new rig in time for some fall sailing. Hopefully, the standing rig can be reused. Once the dust settles, it might be well for him to review insurance company options, also.
Good Luck!
:beer:
 
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