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#914 restoration phase 1

Jul 25, 2019
27
Catalina 22 914 Honolulu, HI
So I've gotten some more knowledgable opinions about my 1971 C22 and consensus seems to be that the most pressing issues are replacing the outboard motor and replacing the standing rigging, specifically the two most lateral shrouds.

As far as the motor, I think that just boils down to writing a (sadly sizable) check. The motor that is currently attached to the boat looks like it was hauled up from the depths. I may get a mechanic to look at it, but I doubt it is salvageable.

But the rigging. Seems like that is something I may be able to replace on my own. I've looked through the tech guide but so far I haven't found any great explanation about how to go about it.

Any thread on here that anyone could point me to? Presumably the mast needs to be lowered for this. Is this a job readily undertaken (and accomplished) by a total amateur?

Thanks!
 
Last edited:

Grotto

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Feb 18, 2018
150
Catalina 22 Firefly Wilmington nc
You can have the guys at west marine help you with nicopress fittings for your shrouds, I would give the turnbuckles a once over as well some of mine were bent and one showed small cracks at the adjustment hole. I am paranoid so new turnbuckles are in order. Better replace a turnbuckle than the rig. As always catalina direct has everything already set you just need some boat bucks
 

AaronD

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Aug 10, 2014
335
Catalina 22 9874 Breezy Newberg, OR / Olympia, WA
But the rigging. Seems like that is something I may be able to replace on my own. I've looked through the tech guide but so far I haven't found any great explanation about how to go about it.
Yes, definitely do this with the mast down. And yes, it's pretty straightforward. CD's kit is ~$500, and includes new open-body turnbuckles. You can do it cheaper by having shrouds made locally, but you'd be hard-pressed to do shrouds and get good 316 SS turnbuckles for that price. My recollection is that all the shrouds arrived in separate labeled bags, so it would be pretty hard to mess it up. Replace one at a time, and you always have the other side to look at if needed.
 
Jul 25, 2019
27
Catalina 22 914 Honolulu, HI
Some updates: found someone to take a look at the engine tomorrow. So, that should tell me if the engine is salvageable or if I need to budget for a new one. The current one is a Suzuki 4-stroke 6 HP, 2008. Based on briefly looking around for a new engine here, most comparable thing I've seen is a 4-stroke 6HP Mercury from West Marine for $1800.

Re: rigging - going to order this, as @AaronD suggested: https://www.catalinadirect.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=product.display&product_id=733
Trying to also think about what other tasks might be easy to knock out while the mast is down. Also going to replace the spreader boots while it's down. Maybe I should do the backstay too? Seems like that is not included in CD's standing rigging kit. Probably best to order as much in one go as possible, because the shipping costs to Hawai'i are usually pretty ugly.

It's tempting to replace the anchor and steaming lights while I have the mast down, but maybe that's getting too ambitious. Eventually, I will have to completely rewire the boat, but that's more like a phase 3 project.
 
Mar 31, 2019
32
Catalina 22 12640 Avalon Steamboat Landing, Portland OR
Having met @AaronD and his C-22 in person, I can confidently say that it’s very wise to follow his advice!

I can’t tell from your photos, but if your boat still has the “pig-tail” style boom lifter, replacing it with a proper boom topping lift is a very worth while project while the mast is lowered. The nice thing is the effort to actually attach the wire to the top of the mast is < 5 minutes, and you can install the rest at your convenience later on with the mast back up.

I did this project recently and it’s dramatically improved the ease, quality, and safety of my sailing. Here’s a link to my install write-up: https://forums.sailboatowners.com/index.php?threads/sailing-and-restoring-avalon-1984-c-22-12640.197072/#post-1543394

A “boom topping lift” kit can be bought from Catalina Direct.

Good luck!

Andre
 
Jul 25, 2019
27
Catalina 22 914 Honolulu, HI
So, no surprise, motor is beyond repair (for reasonable cost). Wondering if 6HP is overkill? Don't want to be underpowered for ocean sailing, if something goes wrong; but, maybe 4.5-5 HP would be sufficient?

Thanks for the suggestion re: boom topping lift. I'll look into that.

CD was going to charge $100 shipping for their mast stepper, so I'm going to give a shot to building my own a la $tingySailor's blueprints. Shipping on rigging, etc. was pretty reasonable, so that's on the way!
 

AaronD

.
Aug 10, 2014
335
Catalina 22 9874 Breezy Newberg, OR / Olympia, WA
If you haven't already ordered an adjustable backstay and/or topping lift, you can do both with single-braid Dyneema (Amsteel, Endura-12, etc.). Cheaper and lighter than cable, and it won't kink while stepping or lowering the mast. My backstay notes are at https://forums.sailboatowners.com/index.php?threads/sailing-and-restoring-9874.195739/page-5#post-1536993. @AndreInPortland will probably have his own notes eventually, as I helped him start on that project. He did a cable topping lift; mine has been synthetic for several years, and it's working great.

Caveat: the synthetic backstay probably isn't class-legal if you wanted to race one-design. I'd guess you could declare it in a PHRF series, probably without penalty. But I thought I should mention that.

Do you already have working mast wiring and/or a VHF antenna and coax? Those and a windex are good targets while your mast is down.
 
Jul 25, 2019
27
Catalina 22 914 Honolulu, HI
Couple of pics from the early stage of my attempt at building a mast crutch. The 1" carriage bolts are hopefully to substitute as pintles. Anyone think this has a snowball's chance of working?

Also, Yamaha is having a promotion until the end of August. 6-HP 4-stroke with 20" shaft is $1542. Suzuki with same specs is $2045, so I'm leaning Yamaha. Anyone have any experience with this particular outboard?
 

Attachments

Jul 25, 2019
27
Catalina 22 914 Honolulu, HI
I don't have any working wiring, to the mast or otherwise :(. Those are definitely projects I want to tackle eventually, but right now I'm trying to somewhat limit the cash outlay. Not too easy with buying a new outboard.

I'm sure there are more mast lowerings in my future, assuming I don't lower it into the Ala Wai on this attempt.

I haven't ordered the boom lift yet, so I'll check out the synthetic. Sounds good. I don't see any racing in the near future. Right now just focused on keeping the mast, keel and rudder attached to the boat. Fingers kind of crossed on the keel, because I don't want to haul out until we've at least sailed her a few times.
 
  • Like
Likes: Gene Neill
May 23, 2016
873
Catalina 22 #12502 BSC
Your mast crutch design looks good and plenty robust enough providing you have a proper roller rigged at the top and some forks to keep the mast on the roller, nice work there!

Regarding outboards, don't shy away from a good used one if one can be found (and you have patience)...nothing wrong w/Yamaha that I know of.. Take a look at Tohatsu 20" 6hp Sailpro....seems it is the default motor for many here on the forum.
I went from a 4.5 Merc to the 6 Tohatsu. The 4.5 did its job, but was a bit under powered in any sort of heavier weather IMO....
 
Sep 30, 2013
3,019
1988 Catalina 22 central Florida
So, no surprise, motor is beyond repair (for reasonable cost). Wondering if 6HP is overkill? Don't want to be underpowered for ocean sailing, if something goes wrong; but, maybe 4.5-5 HP would be sufficient?

For someone sailing in the middle of the Pacific ocean, I wouldn't consider anything less than 6HP. Maybe even 9.9 if you found a deal on one. No short shafts! Long shaft at minimum, extra long shaft would be preferable.
 
Apr 11, 2017
474
Catalina C22 Solomon's Island, MD
Couple of pics from the early stage of my attempt at building a mast crutch. The 1" carriage bolts are hopefully to substitute as pintles. Anyone think this has a snowball's chance of working?

Also, Yamaha is having a promotion until the end of August. 6-HP 4-stroke with 20" shaft is $1542. Suzuki with same specs is $2045, so I'm leaning Yamaha. Anyone have any experience with this particular outboard?
Looks solid. I might be worried a little about scarring up the inside of the gudgeons a bit with the threads of the carriage bolts though. If you want, you might consider wrapping them tightly a few times with duct tape, or electrical tape, if they can still slide in easily. Probably not needed I'm sure, as the stainless is harder I believe, but I'm a nervous sort that way. There are a bunch of good techniques for raising the mast itself, but if you are single handed, and need to raise it each trip - this is an easy method. It's more of a pain if you have a roller furler. If you order some 4" aluminum "L" channel, and double it to form a "U," you can then bolt on a reversible winch, and it's not too bad to make the winch attachment. Good luck with the new boat.
 

AaronD

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Aug 10, 2014
335
Catalina 22 9874 Breezy Newberg, OR / Olympia, WA
... a reversible winch...
Good thoughts from @Hardhead. My quick addition is to consider a brake winch, like the one used for the keel. They're more expensive than a trailer winch (~$100), but if you let go of the handle when lowering, the mast won't free-fall. I have a normal trailer winch holding up the kayak in my garage; I lost my grip once, and nearly broke my wrist trying to grab it again... Made me a believer in brake winches! (and yes, the kayak winch will be replaced someday)

Fulton and Dutton-Lainson make good ones; you can find them on Amazon and eBay.
 
Apr 11, 2017
474
Catalina C22 Solomon's Island, MD
Good thoughts from @Hardhead. My quick addition is to consider a brake winch, like the one used for the keel. They're more expensive than a trailer winch (~$100), but if you let go of the handle when lowering, the mast won't free-fall. I have a normal trailer winch holding up the kayak in my garage; I lost my grip once, and nearly broke my wrist trying to grab it again... Made me a believer in brake winches! (and yes, the kayak winch will be replaced someday)

Fulton and Dutton-Lainson make good ones; you can find them on Amazon and eBay.
I apologize - that's what I meant. When I bought my boat, the PO actually had a spare keel winch included, and that's what I used for the mast attachment. I highly recommend the method if anyone is a little skittish of their current arrangement. It works great with the added unwieldiness a roller furler. I had a few dicey mast raisings before I started using it. It reminds me of a 50 lb wet noodle.
 

AaronD

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Aug 10, 2014
335
Catalina 22 9874 Breezy Newberg, OR / Olympia, WA
I apologize - that's what I meant. When I bought my boat, the PO actually had a spare keel winch included, and that's what I used for the mast attachment. I highly recommend the method if anyone is a little skittish of their current arrangement. It works great with the added unwieldiness a roller furler. I had a few dicey mast raisings before I started using it. It reminds me of a 50 lb wet noodle.
I thought that might be what you meant by 'reversible winch' (and I should have said so); I guessed that might not be obvious to a new C-22 owner and thought it was worth clarifying.

Re: raising with a furler - I rigged a shock-cord tensioner on mine, but I broke it on our last mast raising, so now my 11-year-old is responsible to hold the furler and keep the "50 lb wet noodle" straight. You just need to add a kid or two to your crew :)
 
  • Like
Likes: Hardhead
Apr 11, 2017
474
Catalina C22 Solomon's Island, MD
I thought that might be what you meant by 'reversible winch' (and I should have said so); I guessed that might not be obvious to a new C-22 owner and thought it was worth clarifying.

Re: raising with a furler - I rigged a shock-cord tensioner on mine, but I broke it on our last mast raising, so now my 11-year-old is responsible to hold the furler and keep the "50 lb wet noodle" straight. You just need to add a kid or two to your crew :)
It's good you clarified the brake winch -- someone could get hurt otherwise. It's funny you mention the shock-cord, I do the same thing. Basically make a large shock-cord "rubber-band," and cinch one end around the roller furler drum, and the other to a trailer post eye, via a snap shackle. If shock-cord "rubber-band" is cut right, (almost tight when the mast is up, and taut when it's down and the distance is greater - about 90% stretch of the un-tensioned length), it manages to keep the roller furler centered with the mast, and the dang thing doesn't want to migrate sideways along one of the spreaders. It also counter-balances the natural downward weight of the mast. This system, the shock-cord along with the mast winch, has really made it A LOT easier in my experience. Even no problem to leave a 150 genoa permanently furled on the furler, when raising and lowering the mast solo.
 
Jul 25, 2019
27
Catalina 22 914 Honolulu, HI
That brings up another question I have about changing out the rigging. How do I remove the furled genoa to change out the old forestay for the new one? Maybe simple, but just trying to avoid any surprises.
 

AaronD

.
Aug 10, 2014
335
Catalina 22 9874 Breezy Newberg, OR / Olympia, WA
It's good you clarified the brake winch -- someone could get hurt otherwise. It's funny you mention the shock-cord, I do the same thing. Basically make a large shock-cord "rubber-band," and cinch one end around the roller furler drum, and the other to a trailer post eye, via a snap shackle. If shock-cord "rubber-band" is cut right, (almost tight when the mast is up, and taut when it's down and the distance is greater - about 90% stretch of the un-tensioned length), it manages to keep the roller furler centered with the mast, and the dang thing doesn't want to migrate sideways along one of the spreaders. It also counter-balances the natural downward weight of the mast. This system, the shock-cord along with the mast winch, has really made it A LOT easier in my experience. Even no problem to leave a 150 genoa permanently furled on the furler, when raising and lowering the mast solo.
Nice! Shock cord to the trailer post sounds like about the right length. My hackish system included a turning block at the bow pulpit and back to a cleat. Which would accomplish about the same thing, except that I used an old block with a chipped sheave. The shock cord jammed in the block and the chipped sheave shredded it. Oops. (My wife about jumped off the boat when she heard something break during mast raising! :yikes:) Your system sounds simpler; mind posting pictures sometime?
 

AaronD

.
Aug 10, 2014
335
Catalina 22 9874 Breezy Newberg, OR / Olympia, WA
That brings up another question I have about changing out the rigging. How do I remove the furled genoa to change out the old forestay for the new one? Maybe simple, but just trying to avoid any surprises.
Removing the sail should be pretty easy - wait for a calm wind day, unfurl it, and slide it down out of the furler foil. There should be an opening in the foil slot at the bottom where you can feed it in or out. Putting it back on is just the reverse (with one person feeding the sail in and another pulling it upward with the halyard). At least that's the system with most furlers - the CDI with an integrated halyard might be different. If that's what you have, we'll have to wait for another CDI owner to chime in (or ask @DrJudyB, the expert on all things sail related).

That's the easy part - replacing the forestay in an existing furler foil might be tricky. I'll be interested to hear someone else explain how that's done.