37 cutter to sloop

Jun 21, 2007
2,093
Hunter Cherubini 36_80-82 Sausalito / San Francisco Bay
Hey jssailem:

Good read the link you provided! (But unfortunately the embedded interactive charts won't launch on my Window10 computers or tablet, either in Edge, Internet Explorer, FireFox or Opera. Would have liked to see/play with them. Guess that I've checked too many security/firewall boxes for them to load.)

As I somewhat feared, my inquiry has caused the thread to migrate off topic.

Looking back, I see I probably have been using the wrong terminology. By "inside track", I am referring to t-tracks (with jib sheet cars) that are mounted on the main deck right adjacent to the cabin top. If installed on my 36' boat, these will position the jib sheeting blocks about 20" more towards the center line compared to the OEM snap-shackle-snatch block sheeting attached along the aluminum toe rail. The jib sheets still will be routed outside of the shrouds as with my current toe rail configuration. Whether the jib is a 90% or 100% or a 135%. I am not contemplating routing the jibs sheets inside the shrouds.

Was the 37c outfitted with these type of tracks? Or was sheeting by snap-shackle blocks on the toe rail as was the 1980-82 Cherubini Hunter 36?
 
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Jun 2, 2004
5,802
Hunter 37-cutter, '79 41 23' 30"N 82 33' 20"W--------Huron, OH
Snap shackles on the toe rail was and is the standard method for the yankee. Did Blaise reply above? He is the master of the cutter to sloop conversion.
 
Jun 21, 2007
2,093
Hunter Cherubini 36_80-82 Sausalito / San Francisco Bay
Snap shackles on the toe rail was and is the standard method for the yankee. Did Blaise reply above? He is the master of the cutter to sloop conversion.
Ed: Thanks.

Seems like a long time you have posted? Great that you are still monitoring the Cherubini Hunter forum and are attempting to keeping us true to the "straight and narrow" Cherubini Hunter way... *

* (.. Notwithstanding, I am yet to be dissuaded from my 10 years long OEM modification dream to install jib car t-tracks onto Wildaire's deck. Still a deliberation in progress before the drilling/cutting begins. But I did recently purchase the t-track, two Garhauer jib cars, and the miscellaneous 5/16" bolts/screws/washers to mount. Holding me back from launching into the project after my possibly premature shopping spree was the discovery that the deck core construction and interior ceiling liner positioning wasn't exactly what was indicated after my few exploratory drill holes. But yesterday at the boat, I discovered a possible solution which shouldn't compromise structural integrity and which even may be a more straight-forward installation than I originally planned. Still, before starting, will talk again with my structural engineer friend, then sleep on it for an additional several weeks. Dream/think for 10 years + add several more weeks of thought before cutting. That's about right!)
 
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Jun 2, 2004
5,802
Hunter 37-cutter, '79 41 23' 30"N 82 33' 20"W--------Huron, OH
Are you thinking INSIDE the shrouds? I forgot that I have these pictures from Blaise's boat. You can see his jib tracks and that he sheets between the shrouds and lifelines.100_2895.jpg 100_2896.jpg 100_2897.jpg 100_2899.jpg
 
Jun 21, 2007
2,093
Hunter Cherubini 36_80-82 Sausalito / San Francisco Bay
Are you thinking INSIDE the shrouds? I forgot that I have these pictures from Blaise's boat. You can see his jib tracks and that he sheets between the shrouds and lifelines.View attachment 129530 View attachment 129531 View attachment 129532 View attachment 129533
For Ed:

Thank you so much for posting the pictures. (I presume that Blaise doesn't mind too much!) Yes, as inside the red circle area that I added to one of your posted photos, (attached) that is exactly my project vision. As on the Midnight Sun, my sheets will be routed outside of the shrouds.

For now, however, I am not planning to add the fore/aft "from the cockpit" adjustment system that Blaise has installed. Since I sail in protected waters, rather than open ocean, when I want to move the car fore or aft, I can carefully go on deck when the sheet is on the lazy side and move the car along the track. Much the same as I do now with the OEM snatch block toe rail sheeting.

For BLAISE:

If you are following this thread:

1) Was your addition of the track next to the cabin house an improvement for close haul sailing compared to toe rail sheeting?

2) Have you found any stress/structural issues along the after market t-track? On my 1980 Cherubini Hunter 36, all I have for the deck that close to the cabin housing is ~1/4" -5/16" single layer of FRP. NO WOOD CORE . When I drill through the deck layer from the top at this location, I go into a 1.5" void space (where Hunter routed the 110v wiring) then the interior ceiling liner which at that location is is 1/8" FRP + 3/8" plywood core + 1/8" FRP. (See the other picture I have attached). My previous plan, now definitely reinforced by the pictures Ed posted of Midnight Sun, is to install the track close to the cabin housing. Combining with the segment of the interior liner shown in my photo, I have figured out a way to make the bolt-through very rigid to minimize flex. But just to ask: After you mounted your t-tracks, have you seen any cracking of the FRP? Also any added flexing in the area that might break the caulk seal around the ports? Many thanks for any impressions.
 

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Nov 17, 2012
86
Hunter 37.5 Cherubini Bayfield, WI
My sailing expert corrected me when I listed my H37.5 as a cutter-rigged sloop. He said it is either a cutter or a sloop. I think I (of course) am correct. Who is here?
 
Oct 22, 2014
16,440
CAL 35 Cruiser moored EVERETT WA
Basic design identifies a "Sloop" as a boat with a mast near the forward end of the keel, one head sail tacked to the bow and a main sail.

Modification to the Sloop rig is to move the mast a little towards the stern so that a second head sail can be added inside the primary head sail. This modification was identified as a "Cutter rigged" boat.

While your terminology definitely identifies your boat, for some purists it raises confusion.

For most coastal sailing the Cutter rigging is over kill. It gets in the way of efficient tacking. But put that boat out in the ocean, and you now provide the boat owner with more options for rigging and balancing the boats sail area to optimize powering the boat in a variety of conditions.
 
Nov 17, 2012
86
Hunter 37.5 Cherubini Bayfield, WI
To list it "for sale", I believe it then needs to be done as a cutter, as so many so-called high-end boats, Island Packet types are. Otherwise it gets lost in the list of sloops which 90% of sailboats are. I'm going with cutter. FYI
P.S. I am NOT listing it for sale here; no make, size, condition, location, etc. are offered. I know the rules.
 

Blaise

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Jan 22, 2008
359
Hunter 37-cutter Bradenton
OK. I have written a lot about the advantage of sailing the Hunter 37 as a sloop. If you forget the incredible increase in performance. If you forget the ability to tack in the tenth of the time, if you forget the ability to store a dingy on the foredeck, if you forget that it gives you one less sail to buy for the rest of your life, if you forget being first instead of last to your destination, IF YOU FORGET THE SIZE OF HEADSAIL IS ENTIRELY YOUR CHOICE, sure, a cutter must have an advantage somewhere.
 
Oct 22, 2014
16,440
CAL 35 Cruiser moored EVERETT WA
Jun 8, 2004
915
C&C Frigate 36 St. Margarets Bay, Nova Scotia
OK. I have written a lot about the advantage of sailing the Hunter 37 as a sloop. If you forget the incredible increase in performance. If you forget the ability to tack in the tenth of the time, if you forget the ability to store a dingy on the foredeck, if you forget that it gives you one less sail to buy for the rest of your life, if you forget being first instead of last to your destination, IF YOU FORGET THE SIZE OF HEADSAIL IS ENTIRELY YOUR CHOICE, sure, a cutter must have an advantage somewhere.
This is one of those arguments that will never be decided conclusively. Blaise is 100% correct about the improved upwind performance of the Hunter 37 with the sloop rig, which he has demonstrated by his own successful racing record. And the math of buying two sails instead of three is a no-brainer. However, I do a lot of solo-sailing. I can and do carry an 9' Avon Redcrest on deck, under the staysail boom. And while not having to tack the jib across the inner forestay is faster, I doubt that Blaise tacks 10 times faster than I do, even with his racing crew ;) But for me the deciding factor is when the weather gets snotty: I just roll up the Yankee jib and sail on with the self-tacking staysail and (usually) full main, the boat riding comfortably and tacking without me ever touching a sheet. If the weather gets really bad, I have a reef in the staysail and two reefs in the main. Flexibility is what you get with the cutter rig on the H37C. Just my $0.02.
 

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Alctel

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Dec 13, 2013
263
Hunter 36 Victoria
Funnily enough I'm trying to figure out some way to add a removable solent stay onto my sloop that I can stick a small hank on storm jib onto. A slutter, if you will.
 

Alctel

.
Dec 13, 2013
263
Hunter 36 Victoria
OK. I have written a lot about the advantage of sailing the Hunter 37 as a sloop. If you forget the incredible increase in performance. If you forget the ability to tack in the tenth of the time, if you forget the ability to store a dingy on the foredeck, if you forget that it gives you one less sail to buy for the rest of your life, if you forget being first instead of last to your destination, IF YOU FORGET THE SIZE OF HEADSAIL IS ENTIRELY YOUR CHOICE, sure, a cutter must have an advantage somewhere.
Also Blaise do you have any more info about your jib tracks? I was thinking about doing a similar mod myself