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Winterization Methods

Discussion in 'Day Sailers' started by Cole07, Sep 24, 2018. Add this thread to a FAQ

  1. Cole07

    Cole07

    Joined Sep 23, 2018
    2 posts, 3 likes
    Oday 17
    Old Soul US Moriches bay
    Hi my name is Cole and I recently bought a 1971 Oday Daysailer II. Living in the north east the winters can get pretty cold and snowy, so after my first season I just had some questions about my first winter with the boat.
    I was planning wrap up the whole boat (with the mast down) with a large 20 foot tarp and just leave it in the backyard. This is what I am most likely going to do, but I was just wondering if anyone else has a better way or would like to share any information. Thanks
     


    Last edited: Sep 26, 2018
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  2. shemandr

    shemandr

    Joined Jan 1, 2006
    3,739 posts, 722 likes
    Marblehead Skiff 14'
    US Greenport, NY
    What SBO members are going to love is a 14 yo who wants to own a sailboat. That's great!
    I've had several centerboard boats and winter covering can be challenging. Is it on a trailer? If so you can use the mast as a cover support to keep enough slope in the tarp to drain water and snow. It needs to be pretty steep. I have had some success with attaching gallon water jugs to the tarp edges to maintain tension on it and keep puddles from forming.
    Since tarps are standard sizes and boats aren't they never fit that good. You can pull extra tarp material away from the edges and towards the middle in a fold. That fold will vary in overlap but the edges can end up pretty much where you want them. You can tape the center seem with good quality tape and/or even sew the seem with a machine. The better fit without flapping edges with hold up better in winter winds. Others can weigh in re line ties or bungies. Bungies seem like a good idea but I have to say I've had disappointing results with them.
    If it is on blocks (Not a trailer), it's not that different. You need a center spine for the tarp high enough to drain the water. I've never wrapped a tarp all the way around the boat and I don't recommend that. If sealed to much mildew trapped moisture will cause problems. It's better to have some ventilation.
    Another problem is that you don't want to make a home for critters. Racoons being the worst offenders. So the tarp should fit well at the gunnels. That said, if critters want in there's little that can stop them. So it's wise to monitor the boat during the layup.
     


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  3. Don S/V ILLusion

    Don S/V ILLusion

    Joined Sep 25, 2008
    5,189 posts, 367 likes
    Alden 50
    US Sarasota, Florida
    Cole
    Wrapping it up is a good idea to keep water from freezing in the cockpit so make sure you make some kind of tent which will prevent the cover from collapsing into the cockpit if it has one. Good Place to store the mast which will serve that purpose. Also, if there are any drains init, make sure they are open. And tie the cover down to prevent abrasion as it could move in the wind.
     


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  4. Peggie Hall HeadMistress

    Peggie Hall HeadMistress

    Joined Dec 2, 1997
    7,026 posts, 615 likes
    - -
    US LIttle Rock
    Hi Cole...I see you just joined yesterday...welcome aboard!
    You haven't said what size the boat is...is it big enough to have any plumbing (running water...toilet)? If so, it will need a bit of winterizing...I can explain that for you. If it has a motor, I'm guessing it's an outboard. If so, outboards require a bit of winterizing. Others who have 'em can clue you into what's needed. If there are any cushions, remove 'em and store 'em out of the weather, preferably in "climate controlled" conditions...they'll stay looking good a LOT longer if you do.
    And btw...you found the daysailers forum...there's also an Oday forum. You'll find it if you scroll down under the "forums" menu.
    --Peggie
     


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  5. Ron20324

    Ron20324

    Joined Jan 22, 2008
    6,512 posts, 705 likes
    Beneteau 323
    US Annapolis MD
    If you wrap it up, be sure to allow some air ventilation over the boat.
     


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  6. Will Gilmore

    Will Gilmore

    Joined Oct 19, 2017
    3,526 posts, 1,617 likes
    O'Day 19
    US Littleton, NH
    Welcome to SBO. I hope your sailing adventures are just getting started. I'm sure all of us are looking forward to following your career as a sailor. The Daysailor II is a very nice boat for anyone. You are pretty lucky. My boat is a O'Day Mariner 19. I keep it under a tarp, just a simple, WalMart bought, tarp that covers the whole length with a few feet overhang. I live in NH, so Winters are pretty harsh. 20171225_083407.jpg
    Shemandr gave you excellent advice. Keep the tarp tight to prevent puddling. Also, do the best you can to dry your boat out before Winter sets in.

    It's great to hear from the up and coming generation of sailors. Welcome.

    -Will (Dragonfly)
     


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  7. Brian S

    Brian S

    Joined Nov 9, 2012
    2,364 posts, 158 likes
    Oday 192
    US Lake Nockamixon
    I traditionally strip off hardware from the mast, such as spreaders, pad everything that sticks out from the mast with outdoor carpet, and use the mast as a tarp ridge pole. As others have noted, the higher you can get the mast, the more peak in the tarp, the better it'll shed snow. I've also found that having 3 supports, with the third somewhere close to the middle of the mast, makes it very much stiffer and stronger, and not likely to bend if there is snow load. The trailer for my old 15' daysailer-type boat had a nice mast crutch for the forward end, and I used 1 x3 wood to make a X crossed crutch for the stern end and middle support of the mast. The cheapy blue or brown tarps you can get at big box stores are very flimsy, and they will only last maybe 3 years. Typical tarps found at big box stores also have a much more square aspect ratio that doesn't work well for boats, where you want them quite a bit longer than wider. For this reason, I ordered a heavy silver tarp with better dimensions from here: https://www.tarpusa.com/?category=4 For example, I've had this heavy silver tarp in 12x25 size for my 19' 192 for more than 5 years now. I'm debating if I should replace it this season, as it's getting a fair amount of pinholes now, and I think I tore it this spring. A blue tarp for my Laser-ish boat has only lasted 3 years. Looks like tarp prices have gone down on this site, so that's nice!
     


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  8. Cole07

    Cole07

    Joined Sep 23, 2018
    2 posts, 3 likes
    Oday 17
    Old Soul US Moriches bay
    Thanks to everyone who replied, this definitely helped. My boat is 17' and has no plumbing or electric, and I have a 35lb thrust Minn Kota electric outboard motor which I remove after each trip. I am excited to share my sailing experiences with you.
     


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  9. Ron20324

    Ron20324

    Joined Jan 22, 2008
    6,512 posts, 705 likes
    Beneteau 323
    US Annapolis MD
    Brian, this is a good opertunity to intruduce him to duct tape :).
     


  10. Claybury

    Claybury

    Joined Jun 11, 2018
    9 posts, 2 likes
    O'day Widgeon
    Boat Us Lower Stanchfield
    You may want to block up the trailer axel to take the weight off of the wheels and let air out of the tires to 1/2 pressure or so. Make sure the tarp covers the wheels so they are not in sunlight. You will reduce UV damage and cracking this way.
     


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  11. Will Gilmore

    Will Gilmore

    Joined Oct 19, 2017
    3,526 posts, 1,617 likes
    O'Day 19
    US Littleton, NH
    I should do that. Especially the UV protection. Great idea.

    -Will (Dragonfly)
     


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  12. Brian S

    Brian S

    Joined Nov 9, 2012
    2,364 posts, 158 likes
    Oday 192
    US Lake Nockamixon
    So, I've heard that tape doesn't adhere well to polyethylene tarps, so I bought some rather expensive "tarp tape," which also does not adhere well... I know polyethylene is one of the slipperiest of plastics, and there isn't much that does stick to it well.

    So, y'all think that duct tape is going to work reasonably well? I'm all for buying a nice roll of tape this season, instead of a new tarp...
     


  13. Peggie Hall HeadMistress

    Peggie Hall HeadMistress

    Joined Dec 2, 1997
    7,026 posts, 615 likes
    - -
    US LIttle Rock
    Nothing bonds permanently to PE, so duct tape won't remain stuck to it any longer than any other tape or "glue." I'm thinkin' rope and bungy cords may be the best solution.
    --Peggie
     


  14. Sunbird22358

    Sunbird22358

    Joined Jun 2, 2004
    1,719 posts, 53 likes
    Oday Day Sailer
    US Wareham, MA
    Peggy, he did indicate the size...... 1971 Day Sailer II, so.... 16'9" loa. and no real "systems", No plumbing, well.......... I do have a "little red jug" on my DS II, but dream of someday moving up to the "luxury" of a porta-pottie <grin!>, and no need to "winterize" that level (little jug) of head! <GRIN!!> Water system is bottled water carried aboard and removed before Winter (although even those CAN be left aboard I guess? I usually do, and thus can have a drink aboard if I visit on a above freezing day. (OK, I may have a few "delusions" of the size of my boat?)

    Anyway, Cole, I'd agree with the covering tarp, not sure that I'd use the mast as support, but not really going to do permanent damage on that small of a boat, if you use adequate supports to keep mast off deck of boat. I'd leave the cuddy open (not sure if your boat has any cover for the opening, mine does) and open the 2 "inspection/bailing" ports at the forward end of the cockpit to vent the bilge. I assume the boat is on a good trailer (or adequately blocked up off ground) so just be sure she is well supported, due to the way my 1979 DS II sits on the trailer I insert a pair of wooden wedges between the hull of the boat and the tops of the fenders to better steady her on the trailer (hull flexes and allow boat to rock side to side otherwise). Store the mast with the standing rigging securely lashed to the mast at several points and I usually remove the halyards to give them a good rinse each Fall (along with all the other lines on the boat), then reinstall them in the Spring. Rinse off your sails and once dry, carefully fold them and store in bag in a cool, dry place (garage or shed may be OK if no rodents can get to the sails, or house basement). I like to give my boat a good, thorough cleaning in the Fall to prevent staining and because scum, slime, and barnicles are easier to remove before they dry. For the last several years I have gone over the hull and smooth areas of the deck with a liquid rubbing compound / polish to remove oxidation, then apply a couple of coats of marine paste wax to preserve the finish over the Winter (I then wipe down and apply a couple more coats of wax in the Spring, which is why my almost 40 year old boat still looks great!) I used to do the whole clean and wax in the Spring, but lately the weather is better in the Fall! At the very least, I would go over the whole boat with a "Mr. Clean MAGIC ERASER" and clear water, and rinse well after. OH, I forgot to mention, it is a good idea to remove all loose gear from the boat before winter storage, keep it in a safe place in a box or bin, ready for next season. Removing all that allows for easier cleaning of the boat (and gear!) and reduces the chance of theft while in storage. Over the Winter, I like to give all the woodwork (tiller, boom crutch, cuddy cover boards/door, etc.) a light sanding and 1-2 coats of fresh varnish.
    You MAY want to periodically (I do it every 2-3 years) remove the Centerboard to inspect the lines (well, actually, on the 1971 model, they would both be cables) that raise and lower the CB. Replacements are available from D&R Marine (www.drmarine.com) also good time to check and possible replace the rubber gasket washers on the CB pivot bolt, They last a long time, but still, after 47 years it is worth checking them!
     

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  15. plenny7

    plenny7

    Joined Oct 3, 2014
    223 posts, 125 likes
    Hunter 33.5
    US & Lake City, MN
    Cole, I'm jealous. We didn't get our first sailboat until we were 48. You get to start 34 years earlier than we did!!
     


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  16. Will Gilmore

    Will Gilmore

    Joined Oct 19, 2017
    3,526 posts, 1,617 likes
    O'Day 19
    US Littleton, NH
    And what a great boat to start on. At 14, I was still blowing around in my pram.

    -Will (Dragonfly)
     


  17. Flyingscot64

    Flyingscot64

    Joined Nov 19, 2017
    26 posts, 5 likes
    Oday 14ft
    Javalin Un Next to garage
    On my flyingscot I used 2 tarps of the same brand and size so all the holes line up then bungee cords for tie downs .I would use the tarp I used all summer for bottom as that one is starting to show wear and a brand new one on top. the reason for 2 is for the extra snow weight ,then when it did snow I shovel the driveway and brush off the cover . On my Javelin being a much smaller boat the beam and cockpit area are much smaller and one tarp seams to be enough . Don't make it to complicated so if a nice day comes around you can still take it out. I live in the midwest normally sailing is done in october that is when we may have indian summer maybe 70 we normally have some snow , Nov some freezing on the lakes ,Dec completely froze over with snow on the ground ,One Dec I had some friends that went ice sailing the first week of Dec ,then for some reason we had some warm air come in 40s -50s on off for several weeks by the end of Dec are pool was thawed,so I called one of the guys from the local yacht club and we went out Dec 30th 46 degrees . I have never seen conditions like that again . So I keep it simple incase a situation similar comes around.
     



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