Registered users don't see ads

Un-stepping mast on a Cal 2-25

Discussion in 'Cal' started by Grato, Jan 23, 2017. Add this thread to a FAQ

  1. Grato

    Grato

    Joined Jan 16, 2017
    9 posts, 1 likes
    Cal 2-25 MkII
    US Pensacola, FL Pensacola, FL
    Greetings!

    I have a 1978 Cal 2-25 that is in overall beautiful condition. That being said, I noticed some mast compression and it looks like I need to address some soft spots near the base of the mast. I'll need to unstep the mast. Couple of questions for anyone familiar with this boat.

    1) Local capt. seems to think I could unstep the mast in the slip with 4-5 strong assistants. I would love to save the haul-out and crane fee if at all possible but wanted to get others take on attempting this in the slip?

    2) Is anyone familiar with how this is stepped onto the deck? I know there is a compression post that goes down to the keel but am not sure how the mast base is booted or secured to the deck? Is there anything special I need to do to remove it at the base?

    3) Any other wisdom you more experienced sailors can offer regarding this would be greatly appreciated. The only mast stepping/unstepping experience I have was with a 25' trailerable. That mast was hinged and was a no-brainer.

    I've attached a couple of pics.

    Thanks!
    Dave
     

    Attached Files:



  2. Jalepeno

    Jalepeno

    Joined Mar 2, 2008
    374 posts, 17 likes
    Cal 25 mk II
    CA T-Bird Marina, West Vancouver
    Your "local captain" obviously is not familiar with a CAL 2-25. He may be thinking of the much lighter and older flat-top CAL 25. Our boom uses the same aluminum section as the mast section from the older CAL 25. Our boats have more in common with the CAL 27 and the CAL 29. The mast is deck stepped with the bottom of the mast fitting into a deck bolted aluminum mast base about 2 inches high where the mast wires go though. I don't know the rig total weight but here are the mast boom section specifications:

    Mast:
    Rig-Rite Inc., Kenyon Spars # 4365 (or #3756?) cruising mast section
    Dimensions = 6.50” x 4.30” (165mm x 109mm)
    Length = 32’ - ____”
    Wall thickness = 0.156”
    Weight = 3.70 lbs/ft
    Moment of inertia, I xx = 14.60”, I yy = 7.08”
    Circumference = 17 15/16”
    Alloy = 6061-T6, aluminum
    Sail track = 5/8” external

    Boom:
    Seal’s Spars, Jensen Section (Famet Marine FM-B)
    Rig-Rite Inc., Kenyon E or D section?
    Dimensions = 4.00” x 2.63” (102mm x 67mm)
    Length = 10’ - 0”
    Wall thickness = 0.100”
    Weight = 1.33 lbs/ft
    Moment of inertia, I xx = 2.2”, I yy = 1.1”
    Circumference = 11”
    Alloy = 6063-T6, aluminum
    Sail track = 1/2” round internal, slugs (A018, A118)
     


  3. Jalepeno

    Jalepeno

    Joined Mar 2, 2008
    374 posts, 17 likes
    Cal 25 mk II
    CA T-Bird Marina, West Vancouver
    I used a hole saw to cut a deck opening for my heater flue and found the deck is a sandwich about one inch thick with top and bottom fibreglass skins of about 1/8" and a 3/4" thick dense foam core (pink). On my 1997, the 1/8" thick fibreglass head liner is bonded to the underside of the deck. I don't know if it is solid in the mast area but it would not surprise me. These CALs are well made strong cruising sailboat. They have crossed the Pacific and Atlantic oceans. Some owners has expressed concern about the mast compression post base support but the hollow trapezoidal hull liner/cabin sole is very strong and is bonded to the encapsulated keel /hull fibreglass. I have not experienced or heard of anyone have a problem.
     


  4. shemandr

    shemandr

    Joined Jan 1, 2006
    2,561 posts, 117 likes
    Marblehead Skiff 14'
    US Greenport, NY
    You can unstep the mast on a 25' boat with a well planned and organized effort. But I would caution you that unless you want to pay for one of your buddies health care for the next 40 years, not to mention his kids college education, and living expenses, after he is injured helping you take your mast down, that you consider other options. Friends don't F**k up friends lives - to save a few dollars.
    I've helped take down tens of masts in the slip. We had a knowledgable group, good equipment and a experienced "Foreman." All was well. I've seen a mast taken down by boatyard workers who almost killed someone. You will have real problems with insurance if there is an injury. Do you have workers comp? Disability? You should become familiar with what the employer/employee relationship is. Jones Act ? You could be on the hook big time. Friendship will mean nothing.
    Yards charge a lot for stepping/unstepping masts. But it's cheap. They are insured.
     


  5. centerline

    centerline

    Joined Mar 20, 2012
    3,879 posts, 150 likes
    Cal 34-III, MacGregor 25
    US Salem, Oregon
    yes, I will agree that you can get the mast down by hand while in your slip, but I wouldnt even think of trying it... too much risk for the amount of gain.... risk to you, your helpers, your boat or even worse, your slip neighbors boat.
    then there is the matter of standing it back up again after the repairs.... the problem isnt getting it down, but getting it down in a fully controlled manner that will be the issue.

    even though the cal 25 is only a 25ft boat, the rigging and mast is a btt heavier than your average 25' trailerable sailboat, and is not meant to be handled by hand.
     


  6. Justin_NSA

    Justin_NSA

    Joined Jul 7, 2004
    3,174 posts, 199 likes
    Hunter 30T
    US Wichita, KS
    +1 for hauling it out. Does your marina have a mast pole for (un)stepping?
     


  7. Grato

    Grato

    Joined Jan 16, 2017
    9 posts, 1 likes
    Cal 2-25 MkII
    US Pensacola, FL Pensacola, FL
     


  8. Grato

    Grato

    Joined Jan 16, 2017
    9 posts, 1 likes
    Cal 2-25 MkII
    US Pensacola, FL Pensacola, FL
    Thanks to everyone for the feedback, I really appreciate it. I was down at the boat again today and took some additional pics of what is going on. I'll post them in another thread and see if ya'all have advice on how to tackle this problem (mast compression, not getting the mast unstepped). Thanks again!!
     


  9. centerline

    centerline

    Joined Mar 20, 2012
    3,879 posts, 150 likes
    Cal 34-III, MacGregor 25
    US Salem, Oregon
    one thing you may be able to do to save time, trouble and money is to build a 3/4" plywood pad for the deck, about 12" square or larger, that has a pocket built up in the middle of it to set the foot of the mast in... built it so that it can be lashed to the handrails so it can NOT move foreward, aft or sideways.... then loosen the rigging to its maximum extent and attempt to lift the mast free of its base high enough to set on the plywood base. the rigging will keep the top from falling, and so your only issue is lifting it off its base high enough to transfer it to the temporary base....
    you could add some shackles as extensions to the rigging if more slack is needed.
    it wont take much to hold the mast erect, and as long as the mast cant slip out of its base, it will be safe for its intended purpose.

    after getting it in the support base and positioned out of the way, snug the rigging just enough to hold the top from moving or swaying... then commence the work on your deck...
     


  10. jssailem

    jssailem

    Joined Oct 22, 2014
    1,394 posts, 212 likes
    CAL 35 Cruiser
    US Salem, Moored Port Everett WA
    Centerline idea is a workable one. Your mast is certainly lighter than my 600lb beast. Learned about the weight from the crane driver who lifted it off the boat and laid it on the dock. Cost for lifting the mast off the boat and back onto the boat often repairs was $300. Took 30 minutes to remove and 60 minutes to return. Even with the crane still took 2 crane workers from the port, and 3 of use to mange the mast once it was hung on the crane. It is a bit more involved than I first imagined. Getting the mast vertical so you can reseat it was a trick.
     



Merriman pedestal control head
Finally, an aluminum replacement for this YS Merriman part.
Turn any toilet into a Raritan for a fraction of the cost
The Raritan LBA matches your existing bowl with the pump/plumbing of a PHII or PHC. save!
Flexible steel chafe pads
Innovative new product made of flexible, laser cut stainless steel. Must see!
NEW, updated Get Rid of Boat Odors
The bible of marine toilets and plumbing, expanded and updated for 2016!