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Soft Foredeck

Discussion in 'Ask An Oday Owner' started by Swiplash, Oct 8, 2017. Add this thread to a FAQ

  1. Jackdaw

    Jackdaw

    Joined Nov 8, 2010
    7,160 posts, 1,122 likes
    Beneteau First 36.7 & 260
    US Minneapolis MN & Bayfield WI
    @Swiplash and @Love and Luck
    Both you guys are total noobies, so I'll cut you some slack and give you some advice. Old boats come in all state of repair; good to basket-case. The difference in price is usually much less then what someone would invest in time and money to bring a bad one up to scratch. That assumes someone knowing what they are doing, and doing it right. With all respect, that does not seem to be the case here, based on the questions you are asking and the solutions you are proposing. Your money/time your choice, but I'd suggest that you listen to some of the advice here, and maybe look for a better boat.

    In any case, don't get wound up when people suggest that; its probably the best course of action.
     


    Davidasailor26 likes this.
  2. John Tubb

    John Tubb

    Joined Feb 14, 2017
    388 posts, 61 likes
    O'Day 25
    US Huntsville, AL Guntersville, AL
    With a soft core the through bolts will eventually compress the deck and crack it, plus the bolts will show and add anouther leak path.

    If she is free or really cheap sounds like a deal. All that work to try and make nice looking I'd cut the headliner out, you wouldn't see it anyway and could be covered with a headliner and look nice. Still I've seen O'day 25 and 26 listed with trailers in the 4-7k range you could consider.

    I'm a new owner and I would recommend listening to Jack and CB
     


  3. Love and Luck

    Love and Luck

    Joined Sep 25, 2016
    62 posts, 23 likes
    Oday 22
    US Halfway between Erie and Pittsburgh Lake Arthur
    not everyone needs to wait two years for a Pogo, Jack. Some people just want to get out and sail with what their means allows.

    It's "you didn't mortgage your daughters so you shouldn't sail" attitudes that have been keeping people away from sailing.

    My first car wasn't a Ferrari. It was a Ford Pinto. It ran, for a while. Then I bought a Subaru. I still don't want a Ferrari, not really. Fast isn't all there is to life.
     


  4. Swiplash

    Swiplash

    Joined Oct 2, 2017
    10 posts, 2 likes
    O'Day 25
    US Maryland Annapolis
    Yup. there are a ton of boats in Annapolis but none that meet my criteria. 25 feet, Keel/CB. Only other boat that fit that bill is the Ericson 25. They are hard to find. Price is also a consideration because I'm cheap. I'll use collar washers for the bolts and
     


  5. SG

    SG

    Joined Feb 11, 2017
    491 posts, 53 likes
    J/Boat J/160
    US Annapolis
    not everyone needs to wait two years for a Pogo, Jack. Some people just want to get out and sail with what their means allows.

    It's "you didn't mortgage your daughters so you shouldn't sail" attitudes that have been keeping people away from sailing.

    My first car wasn't a Ferrari. It was a Ford Pinto. It ran, for a while. Then I bought a Subaru. I still don't want a Ferrari, not really. Fast isn't all there is to life.


    It's been pretty "gentle" here (for the most part) :^))) Hopefully it will stay that way.

    What's a 'Pogo'????

    Beyond that: Simply commenting on one's view of sensibility of doing something is just giving advice. In most cases that what one asks for it here by posting. If you didn't want advice, and just want affirmation or reinforcement this might not be the best place to post. :^))).

    That doesn't mean that all advice given is correct. People here, just like anyplace, can occasionally get their "facts wrong".

    This place would be pretty boring if all people did was provide emotional affirmation of individuals' "plans".
     


  6. Davidasailor26

    Davidasailor26

    Joined May 17, 2004
    869 posts, 90 likes
    Beneteau Oceanis 37 LE
    US Havre de Grace
    I don’t think Jackdaw or anyone else here is suggesting a new boat is the solution. The suggestion is that swiplash carefully consider whether the boat he’s looking at will really be less expensive in the long run than something that’s in better repair. We don’t know anything about how much swiplash is looking to spend on this boat - we’re not judging that. We’re just giving informed opinions on what it will likely take to make the boat usable given the problem he’s described. Certainly some people on this forum have done great things with old boats to fix their rot, and I respect that a lot. But to tell swiplash to just go and buy the boat regardless of what’s wrong with it, just because the sale price is within his budget, is not responsible either.
     


  7. Panera

    Panera

    Joined Jan 18, 2014
    8 posts, 0 likes
    Oday 25
    US Portland, ME
    I have a 1978 O'Day 25. Core rot is a problem. I've chosen to make strengthening patches. Removing the Pulpit, cut the fiberglass under the pulpit attachment places. Remove and save the cutout. Then clean out as much rotted material between the layers as far in as possible. I used a pressure washer to clean out between the layers. Let is really dry out. Then get some fill material, lots of little blocks of wood impregnated with resin. Make sure that the thickness is correct to fit between the layers. I then mix up some resin and dip the blocks one at a time and insert them between the layers pushing them as far as possible into the cleaned out area. Keep going until the area is filled and inject some extra resin into the area. Replace and bond the cut out fiberglass let cure the replace the pulpit drilling new holes, and lots of backing inside.
    I've done this with stantions with great success. There are some places that you cannot get to using this technique but is works for those areas that really need strengthening.
     


  8. HEINZIR

    HEINZIR

    Joined Jan 22, 2008
    151 posts, 5 likes
    Macgregor Venture of Newport 23, Montgomery 17, Force 5, Mirror sailing dinghy, El Toro sailing dinghy
    US Mound, MN -- Lake Minnetonka
    I’ve done something similar in re-coring sections of the deck of my 1979 Montgomery 17. I had been dreading this job and was torn between various approaches to the repair. The inside fix turned out to be relatively easy and mess free.

    I cut out large pieces of the inner skin with a multi-tool and scraped out the rotten parts, leaving the skin intact. I cleaned and sanded the fiberglass skins in my garage, then epoxied on the appropriate thickness of end grain balsa core that I had ordered from Defender. After the epoxy set I trimmed the excess core from the edges of the fiberglass. Then I saturated each piece (individually, one per day) with slightly thickened epoxy and carefully brought it into the boat and put it in place. (Needless to say, I had removed the cushions and lined the v-berth with plastic sheeting to protect the cabin from spills.) I used a couple of bottle jacks and some scrap 2x4s to hold the section in place until the epoxy kicked. Repeated the process every day until all of the irregular shaped pieces were laminated in place and formed a secure deck. A little sanding and some touch up with epoxy and I was done. I will probably paint it or add a fabric headliner at some point but it is mostly out of sight so it might be a while.

    I was able to take my time doing this because I can only have one boat on my mooring at a time. Last year was Chiquita’s turn in the water, leaving Monita, the M17, on the hard in my driveway. So I could work on one Boat and still sail the other when the mood struck.

    Henry
     


  9. jibes138

    jibes138

    Joined Jan 27, 2008
    2,700 posts, 76 likes
    ODay 35
    US Beaufort, NC
    Not sure I'm getting this "bracing" idea? You have two layers of FRP with a large gap between them. Bracing the bottom layer does nothing to stop the top layer from flexing down when stepped on. You will never be able to tighten the nuts as the deck will keep flexing until the two layers come in contact. You need to fill that gap with something solid that also bonds to both layers.
     


  10. Hayden Watson

    Hayden Watson

    Joined Apr 5, 2009
    268 posts, 28 likes
    Catalina C30 tr/bs
    US Oak Harbor, WA
    I concur. at the bare minimum any holes drilled through the deck to use for bolting on a below deck brace would need to be "potted" in order to make a small compression post to keep the bolts from pulling the two skins together and causing further damage. This should become obvious as soon as the first hole is drilled if the core is rotten.
     


  11. John Tubb

    John Tubb

    Joined Feb 14, 2017
    388 posts, 61 likes
    O'Day 25
    US Huntsville, AL Guntersville, AL
    Deck will still flex in the opan areas unless the plan is to use a lot of bolts everywhere. I'll be honest I would not touch a boat repaired like that. I looked at an AMF 23 with somthing similar and said nope.
     


  12. Swiplash

    Swiplash

    Joined Oct 2, 2017
    10 posts, 2 likes
    O'Day 25
    US Maryland Annapolis
    I don't usually make major mistakes, but with this one I really stirred up a hornets nest. My original post asked if a soft foredeck in an oday 25 was normal. I had other things in that post and on my mind but that was the primary issue. What I meant to say was a soft foredeck in an oday 25 COMMON!! Don't know the answer to that and frankly I don't care anymore. If I want the boat I'll buy it. I've built 30 boats over the last 25 years with wood and fiberglass and I know my way around repairs and fixes. So thank you all for the comments. If I decide to fix that problem I'll post pictures and a write up in one of the other sections. I'll also stay off this forum.
     


  13. LeeandRick

    LeeandRick

    Joined Apr 26, 2015
    227 posts, 51 likes
    Oday 23-2, S2 26 Mid
    US Lake Havasu
    Well there you have it. The good, the bad, and the average comment on a forum, then the goodbye, almost in less than 24 hours. I think I'll stay. Thanks for the positive or negative comments to my questions folks. Makes me think.:ass:
     


    Gene Neill likes this.
  14. John Tubb

    John Tubb

    Joined Feb 14, 2017
    388 posts, 61 likes
    O'Day 25
    US Huntsville, AL Guntersville, AL
  15. Ward H

    Ward H

    Joined Nov 7, 2011
    1,455 posts, 86 likes
    Oday 25
    US Barnegat, NJ
    I have a rare 1980 O'day 25. Rare because I've installed new winches, standup blocks on the deck, then jib car tracks, chain plates, traveler for the main and a deck organizer plate under the mast tabernacle.
    Only soft wood I found was a very small area under the mast plate, no bigger than the mast plate.
    While I haven't gone looking for wet decks my stanchions, pulpit and pushpit are all solid. Bulkheads are solid.
    You asked if it was common to have flex in the foredeck. There isn't on mine. If it is common, its probably only because there are more old boats in poor shape than old boats in good shape.
     


  16. Apex

    Apex

    Joined Jun 19, 2013
    603 posts, 40 likes
    Oday 28
    US Muskegon
    nice answer Ward: I have a friend who had an O'Day 25, soft foredeck. It was indeed in poor shape. He knew it, and lived with it. Unfortunately the soft deck is RARELY the ONLY part of the boat in poor condition, leakng chainplates led to a rotted bulkhead, and ultimately his mast came down. After trying to repair the boat was simply scrapped, there are many other boats for cheap out there that directed the financial decision to scrap rather than repair.
     



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