Repairing Hunter 40 damage from Hurricane Matthew

Discussion in 'Big Boats' started by B757Captain, Nov 30, 2016. Add this thread to a FAQ

  1. B757Captain

    B757Captain

    Joined May 8, 2013
    271 posts, 194 likes
    Hunter 40
    US Dataw Island, SC
    I had to use the translator to decipher your header - I can only read about 1/3rd Katakana, two characters of Kanji and no Hirigana! That's the extent of my written Japanese.

    As to the rest of your post, thanks for the kind words! Feel free to PM me any time with specifics - I have some more photos in my archives from work past which shows some of the original stuff (holding tank plumbing, etc.) and though you obviously don't need to dig as deep as I am, I did have years of fixing and upgrading EV before the current rebuild.

    Cheers,

    Mark
     


    Last edited: May 24, 2019
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  2. B757Captain

    B757Captain

    Joined May 8, 2013
    271 posts, 194 likes
    Hunter 40
    US Dataw Island, SC
    Mostly a. I have lots of epoxy sitting in the garage and ready access to more without needing to order, and b. greater familiarity with epoxies. As I understand using laminating resins, they still need peel ply, gel coat (with wax) or PVA over top to cure so I'm not sure it would have made the job any easier. Due to the number of layers, all of which were mostly vertical I don't think I could have done them all in one go, so the additional work for the epoxy was in the scrubbing and sanding between the two rounds of layup. That would have been cancelled out by the need for the top cover and finish requirements on the laminating resin.

    Mostly though, I have tons (well gallons :)) of epoxy already.

    Mark
     


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  3. B757Captain

    B757Captain

    Joined May 8, 2013
    271 posts, 194 likes
    Hunter 40
    US Dataw Island, SC
    A long awaited update, final chapter (final, um, whatever!):

    With the boat watertight again, domestic chores complete and sore muscles still a bit sore, I was running a little short on time left at home to get the primer/paint process done for the anchor well so I decided to delay that until July. Plus I have one more glass project to do so I can prime and paint it, the battery box and the anchor well all together. Don't despair, though, for me short on time never means out of time! I got some actual repair work in this repair/upgrade project done:

    [​IMG]

    Bow rollers reinstalled. Not a big deal in the grand scheme of things but they are old pieces being put back on.

    Next up was a little cabinetry. I measured out and fitted the enclosure for the fridge. The pieces are only about half attached and I did not have time to cut a corner piece (what's there are two old short pieces I had left over. Still useful for fitting purposes):

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    There is quite a bit of empty space behind the fridge and I'm not sure yet whether to leave it or find a doodad to put behind there. As the galley construction progresses and I start fitting equipment I'll know if that space is needed. Access when the galley is finished will be really difficult so it may just end up empty. I plan on building an additional cabinet on top of the fridge for a microwave to finish out the corner.

    Now for the plan for July: Since it will probably be hotter than Hades during the day, I'll have the a/c cranked up and concentrate on inside work. First up will be some work in the bilge. I have some old access holes to plug up and an upgrade project - adding a slight incline to the bilge floor. Currently the bilge is long and narrow but flat on the bottom. There is always about an inch to inch and a half of water there that the bilge pump can't get. Probably not a big deal but it bugs me, so I plan on glassing in a little bit of a bevel to the bilge floor (bilge pump(s) in the middle, bevels front and rear) to minimize the water accumulation. Next up will be to finish the inside work on the anchor well by tying in the cabin liner to the new pieces. With that done, I'll prime and paint the bilge, the battery box and the anchor well. Cabinetry work will continue as well, finishing the fridge enclosure and finishing the shelves for the pantry. Then some of those pieces can come back out for paint and clearcoat. Plus anything else that I can think of.

    Thanks for watching!

    Mark san
     


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  4. Daveinet

    Daveinet

    Joined Sep 20, 2014
    1,047 posts, 232 likes
    Rob Legg RL24
    US Chain O'Lakes
    Weapons storage?? But seriously, what would happen if you step the fridge back towards the wall farther? Leave the base cabinet were it is, but put a lid on it, so you have storage below the fridge. Not sure about you, but I'm wider at waist level than down by my feet. Not only that, but since your fridge is below eye level, you have to bend over to see in. If the fridge is stepped back, it gives you more space to bend over as you reach down into the fridge.
     


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  5. senang

    senang

    Joined Oct 21, 2009
    37 posts, 11 likes
    hunter 38
    FR Monaco
    Another solution would be to install a small aquarium pump to get that inch of water out of the bilge and have it empty in the kitchen sink. Put a push buttom activation at the sink and pump every morning first thing.
     


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  6. Hayden Watson

    Hayden Watson

    Joined Apr 5, 2009
    749 posts, 224 likes
    Catalina '88 C30 tr/bs
    US Oak Harbor, WA
    There is a commercial system that does this. http://www.drybilgesystem.com/index.html
    I know of one guy that made his own with a $10 diaphragm pump from Amazon, some tubing and an electrical switch cover plate with a sponge glued to the inside face and a hose barb epoxied out the exterior face.
     


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  7. limbodog

    limbodog

    Joined Jul 16, 2018
    85 posts, 14 likes
    Hunter 40
    US Boston
    Looking great!

    Do refrigerators need ventilation to cool properly? I'm curious if you plan to leave some gap for the air to circulate through. You mentioned before that you like being able to get behind everything. Considering the space behind the fridge is narrow but deep, and in a galley, it seems like a good place to put a rack to keep plates and cutlery to me.
     


  8. B757Captain

    B757Captain

    Joined May 8, 2013
    271 posts, 194 likes
    Hunter 40
    US Dataw Island, SC
    Weapons storage - I like your thinking!! Seriously though, this area will really be hidden and mostly inaccessible. My first thought was to put the water heater back there but that raises the (WH)heat exchanger above the fill level of the engine coolant system. I might still engineer a solution and do that. As the fridge sits now It can't be set back more than a few inches due to boat structure behind. It's really no big deal to leave the space empty - in the grand scheme of things it's only a few cubic feet but I am a big fan of optimizing every nook and cranny. That's the cross I bear!

    I'm fighting the wider vs. narrower areas too as time goes by! Sitting in a cockpit for 12 hours a day isn't helping :(

    Cheers,

    Mark
     


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  9. B757Captain

    B757Captain

    Joined May 8, 2013
    271 posts, 194 likes
    Hunter 40
    US Dataw Island, SC
    I had seen this and balked at the $400 price tag. I hadn't thought about an aquarium pump though. Will look into that.
     


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  10. B757Captain

    B757Captain

    Joined May 8, 2013
    271 posts, 194 likes
    Hunter 40
    US Dataw Island, SC
    They do need ventilation - if you look close the top flange of the fridge has a vent grill in it, I just haven't finished massaging the cabinet yet to make the slot for the vent. I was also considering a series of small (computer type) fans in all the cabinets to increase airflow and cut down the moisture levels.

    Any kind of accessible storage in that space is problematic - eventually that whole corner will be filled with galley. Anything back there I have to consider permanent or semi-permanent because the easiest way to get behind there will be to remove the fridge.

    Cheers,

    Mark
     


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  11. limbodog

    limbodog

    Joined Jul 16, 2018
    85 posts, 14 likes
    Hunter 40
    US Boston
    >I was also considering a series of small (computer type) fans in all the cabinets to increase airflow and cut down the moisture levels.​

    Now that's a good idea! Building computers I know. And directing airflow is part science part art. Putting a couple intakes at one end of the salon and a couple outflows at the other and you could create a steady air channel behind and under the cabinets. Especially with a few well placed fins to keep the air going the way you want. I was thinking the Hunters were designed for Florida and it was just assumed it would never be cold enough for everything to condense (or freeze to the interior). That first cold evening last fall turned my interior into a rainforest with every surface looking like a soda commercial with water beading and pouring off of it. That was when I realized that every cabinet and void had the same thing going on, only I couldn't see it. It makes me want to replace all the sliding plexy with netting so that air is never trapped anywhere.

    I'm still considering putting some air holes on the sides of all the under-bench storage just so it can vent a bit. But now I think maybe a couple cheap strategically placed blowers could do more than a large number of holes to keep the humidity circulating to where I can deal with it.
     


  12. Daveinet

    Daveinet

    Joined Sep 20, 2014
    1,047 posts, 232 likes
    Rob Legg RL24
    US Chain O'Lakes
    Naw, the water will always be cooler than the ambient air. Install a heat exchanger that circulates water from under the boat.
     


  13. Hayden Watson

    Hayden Watson

    Joined Apr 5, 2009
    749 posts, 224 likes
    Catalina '88 C30 tr/bs
    US Oak Harbor, WA
    Said like a true warm weather sailor. Our water in the PNW ranges from 50º to 60º year around. The air temperature ranges from 20º's in winter to low 80º's in summer. Many of us sail all year round. There is lots of time with the water is warmer than the air.
     


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  14. Daveinet

    Daveinet

    Joined Sep 20, 2014
    1,047 posts, 232 likes
    Rob Legg RL24
    US Chain O'Lakes
    Impossible to do. There are times when the ice is too thin to sail on.