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Repair of My '79 O'Day 19

Discussion in 'Day Sailers' started by theluckyone17, May 6, 2018. Add this thread to a FAQ

  1. theluckyone17

    theluckyone17

    Joined Apr 13, 2018
    6 posts, 3 likes
    O'Day 19
    US Rexford, NY
    Figured I'd keep a running log of the repair and rehabilitation of my recently purchased/rescued '79 O'Day 19.

    She needs quite a bit of work before I'm comfortable putting her in the water. I have to believe she was a bit neglected by previous owners. The hose joining the cabin drain to the transom drain was missing, so there was likely a lot of water in the hull. The extra weight likely caused the port trailer bunk (improperly seated against the hull at an angle) to oilcan and crack the hull just at the front support. It also bent the trailer. So these are my mandatories:
    • Replace the cockpit drain assembly (hose, clamps, cockpit drain, transom drain). I have a temporary workaround in place now, keeping most of the water out of the bilge.
    • Repair the crack in the hull.
    • The starboard hull/deck joint has separated. I'll need to clean it out and reseal it with 3M 5200. There's a few spots on that joint that will need fiberglass repairs, too.
    • Port jib car is damaged, should be replaced.
    • While I've got the boat up on blocks to repair the crack in the hull, I'll drop the trailer off at a local collision shop. Hoping they can straighten the frame and weld support plates in (if deemed necessary).
    • Build supports for the mast while transporting.
    • There's plenty of nicks and dings to the gelcoat that need to be cleaned up.
    • Acquire an anchor, chain, and rode.
    • Drop the centerboard and make repairs as needed. Looks like a good gouge out of the leading edge, from what I've seen so far.
    • Get the mast up, and go over the rigging, lines, and sails.
    • Cleaning & polishing & waxing.
    • Rebed all the deck hardware, repairing cracked gelcoat as necessary, and applying new butyl tape.
    • Get a new latch for the bow hatch.
    • Rig up a method to secure the companionway hatch to the boat. Don't need that going overboard.
    • Replace the retaining lip for the companionway hatch. Left half of it has broken off.
    Less important, but I'll want them for daysailing:
    • Small outboard, four to six HP.
    • Clean up & varnish or replace the companionway boards and trim.
    • There's a few spots in the cabin that need fiberglass.
    • Install an inspection port in the interior of the cabin, providing access to the bow.
    • The bow eye had been removed by a previous owner. It should be replaced, and the backing inspected/replaced as needed.
    • A port window on the port side of the companionway. That cabin's awful dark when it's closed up.
    • Interior cushions made up. Wife says if I buy her a sewing machine, she'll tackle them.
    • Swim ladder.
    For weekending:
    • Small portapotty or Wag Woo style method of dealing with bodily waste when weekend overnighting on inland lakes.
    • Legal running lights for overnighting, plus the battery & solar charger required. A USB charging system would be nice for phones & portable speakers. 12 VDC for charging laptops would be even better.
    • Small alcohol stove.
    • Small sink, draining to a container I can easily drain/dump as needed.
     


    Will Gilmore likes this.
  2. John Tubb

    John Tubb

    Joined Feb 14, 2017
    583 posts, 115 likes
    O'Day 25
    US Guntersville, AL
    Good luck and you need before pics to start this off right!
     


  3. theluckyone17

    theluckyone17

    Joined Apr 13, 2018
    6 posts, 3 likes
    O'Day 19
    US Rexford, NY
    Her best angle first:
    [​IMG]

    Pretty obvious where I've been using Barkeeper's Friend to clean off the scum from the hull:
    [​IMG]

    She looks pretty good from this angle, too:
    [​IMG]

    Trailer is bent right about here:
    [​IMG]

    You can see where the C-channel's crimped upwards a bit on the top. Needs a good sandblasting and painting, too:
    [​IMG]

    Sure looks like the frame's twisted a bit from this angle, too:
    [​IMG]
    Now for the ugly. Hard to see, but the hull's oil canned here a bit, and that rotted bunk is hiding a good crack. When I first saw her, that bunk was tilted up at an angle. I lifted the bow up a bit and twisted the bunk back to flat. Didn't want it doing any more damage if I walked in the boat:
    [​IMG]

    Whole starboard deck/hull joint is separated. Gonna need to get the joint cleaned out, sanded roughly, pumped full of 5200, then clamped down:
    [​IMG]

    Gonna have plenty of fiberglass & gelcoat to repair on the joint, too:
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    That plastic bit, probably meant to serve as a bump for the rudder (anyone know the name?) is broken off. There's a snap on it for the canvas cockpit cover, probably overstressed it and snapped it:
    [​IMG]

    Transom bit of my temporary drain repair. Should have this fixed next week, once parts are in:
    [​IMG]

    Cockpit floor has a stress gelcoat crack. Might see if I can get the floor reinforced/braced a bit, since it does flex a bit:
    [​IMG]

    Gonna try to clean up this teak, though I might just replace it. Plywood's worse off than the trim. That said, a little epoxy and varnish, and it'd be fine structurally. Might need to wait 'til next year:
    [​IMG]

    Companionway hatch retaining plate is got a notch knocked out of it:
    [​IMG]

    Weatherstrip needs to be replaced:
    [​IMG]

    A few nicks and gouges on the cover needs to be fixed:
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    Port jib car is torn up:

    [​IMG]
    Port chainplate for the rigging near the jib car has gelcoat stress fractures, too:
    [​IMG]

    Got a chip in the gelcoat where the hatch sits:
    [​IMG]

    Missing the retaining bits for the forward hatch:
    [​IMG]

    Crack in the "icebox" under the v-berth in the cabin:
    [​IMG]
    And cleaning up a couple of holes I drilled trying to pump the water out of the bow. Should've just gotten it from the bilge. Ah, well. More opportunity to become better at fiberglass repair:
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    Semi-patched crack in the corner of that "icebox":
    [​IMG]

    Haven't gotten to cleaning the cabin out yet:
    [​IMG]

    Gonna need to fab up some lids & cushions, too:
    [​IMG]
    Shelving edge looks good, but the trim around it doesn't:
    [​IMG]
    Underside of the chainplates and jib cars look good on the starboard side:
    [​IMG]
    Port side looks like it could be resealed:
    [​IMG]

    Odd thing about the tabernacle bolts... two are neatly cut/ground off. Other two aren't:
    [​IMG]

    Different style bolts, too... Phillips vs flat head. Kinda thinking it might be worth popping that off and getting a good look at what's underneath. Just to be safe:
    [​IMG]
     


    Will Gilmore likes this.
  4. John Tubb

    John Tubb

    Joined Feb 14, 2017
    583 posts, 115 likes
    O'Day 25
    US Guntersville, AL
    Not too bad, I'd focus on functional fixes to get her in the water and sailing, cosmetics can wait in my book.
     


  5. theluckyone17

    theluckyone17

    Joined Apr 13, 2018
    6 posts, 3 likes
    O'Day 19
    US Rexford, NY
    Agreed. Fix the stuff that's keeping her from being in the water and sailing:
    • Repair the crack in the hull
    • Repair the starboard deck/hull joint.
    • Bend the trailer frame straight and reinforce the bend area.
    • Replace the cockpit to transom drain assembly.
    I don't want to burn out trying to fix everything before putting her in the water... All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy who gives up on the project and never sails again.
     


  6. John Tubb

    John Tubb

    Joined Feb 14, 2017
    583 posts, 115 likes
    O'Day 25
    US Guntersville, AL
    Sounds like a good approach. My O'day came 'ready to sail' and in fact we did sail it right away. I have found plenty of things to work on, first was electrical (DC). Unfortunately the sails and motor only lasted to first season so she is now sporting new power, new teak toe rails and all hardware rebidded. I'm planning a bit of clean up for the seat cushions next but only after I'm sure we are not leaking on them.
     


  7. theluckyone17

    theluckyone17

    Joined Apr 13, 2018
    6 posts, 3 likes
    O'Day 19
    US Rexford, NY
    I'm back in town, after the wife graduated from her doctorate program (Occupational Therapy; we've got a doctor in the family!). Figured I'd tackle that drain replacement, since it "should be easy." Ha!

    The plywood core in the transom is definitely rotted around the drain. Did some more poking around the mount holes for the lower gudgeon, and it's rotted there. Did some exploratory drilling up, and I start hitting dry plywood a couple inches below the upper gudgeon.

    My current plan:
    • Mark up a template for the lower gudgeon location (done)
    • Mark out a box to cut through the outer layer of fiberglass, preferably inside the edge of the plywood. I can always cut more out later. (done)
    • Remove the outer layer of fiberglass.
    • Clean out the rotted plywood.
    • Bed the plywood in epoxy.
    • Fiberglass over the new core.
    • Drill oversized holes for the transom drain & lower gudgeon.
    • Fill the holes with epoxy (sealing both ends with tape, since the transom's a vertical surface). Using a syringe to deliver the epoxy might help here
    • Either let the epoxy cure properly and wash any blush off well, then use CSM and polyester resin for a final layer, then gelcoat... or just bite the bullet and paint over the entire bottom sides.
    • Drill the proper sized holes for the drain & gudeon.
     


    Will Gilmore likes this.
  8. topcat0399

    topcat0399

    Joined Aug 22, 2011
    980 posts, 66 likes
    MacGregor Venture V224
    US Cheeseland
    Its good to keep a log of work done.

    I have STOPPED keeping track of $$$ spent. Just makes one crazy.....
     


  9. Will Gilmore

    Will Gilmore

    Joined Oct 19, 2017
    2,147 posts, 841 likes
    O'Day 19
    US Littleton, NH
    theluckyone17,
    I like the way you have catalogued your work.
    I can't think of anything helpful to add, but you might save money by going with a smaller motor. The Mariner 19, that I own, moves along quite well with 2hp. Most, however, use a 4 horse. I am planning on putting a trolling motor on mine and those that I've talked to, that use them, have no complaints for power and speed. The Mariner is about 600 lbs lighter, so that may not be the case for the O19.

    The "oil canning" is most concerning to me. You have a weak spot there and maybe rotten ribs or stringers. If there are no ribs or stringers, you might want to consider reinforcing the area with such.
    Good luck and I am looking forward to watching your progress.

    -Will (Dragonfly)
     



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