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Problem with Harken roller furling wrap stop

Discussion in 'Mid-Size Boats' started by Reg M, Aug 15, 2017. Add this thread to a FAQ

  1. Reg M

    Reg M

    Joined May 21, 2016
    112 posts, 5 likes
    Hunter 31
    Ca Montague, Prince Edward Island Montague
    I am having problems with the Harken roller furling wrap stop on my 1984 H31 . When I furl the jib the wrap stop seems to be catching and causes the jib halyard to want to wrap around the foil. I have to keep easing and pulling on the furling line in order to furl the jib. My sail is a bit shorter than a full size jib so I use a short wire pennant to make up the shortage. The pennant was at the top but I tried it at the bottom with no difference. I am thinking that the problem is due to the fact that the halyard seems to run parallel to the foil from the wrap stop to the mast sheave rather than at an angle which would prevent the wrap stop from turning. Has anyone else had this problem and if so, how did you fix it? Thanks for any input. Reg
     


  2. Sefuller

    Sefuller

    Joined May 6, 2010
    270 posts, 29 likes
    Oday 34
    US Milwaukee
  3. Reg M

    Reg M

    Joined May 21, 2016
    112 posts, 5 likes
    Hunter 31
    Ca Montague, Prince Edward Island Montague
    No, I don't have one - yet!! I'll be ordering one up though, seems like the solution to my problem. Do you have one on your boat? If so, what size would be appropriate for a H31, the 944 or 945? Thanks.
     


    Last edited: Aug 16, 2017
  4. Barnacle Bill

    Barnacle Bill

    Joined Jun 9, 2008
    1,453 posts, 15 likes
    - --
    US -Bayfield
    I'm not sure what a "wrap stop" is, but one of the common problems with any furler is halyard wrap at the top where the angle of the halyard to the top swivel does not have a proper lead or angle and so the halyard wraps around the extrusion binding it up. The solution is a halyard restrainer which Harken sells separately. It is something that the jib halyard feeds through after it is bolted to the mast allowing a proper lead of the halyard to the upper swivel eliminating the halyard wrap problem. It usually is installed some inches (varies with situation) below where the halyard exits the masthead, or exit block if the boat is a fractional rig so that there is a more direct angle that won't allow the halyard, which before had less of an angle (this is hard to verbalize in print). I could draw a picture if you aren't getting it.
     


  5. Sefuller

    Sefuller

    Joined May 6, 2010
    270 posts, 29 likes
    Oday 34
    US Milwaukee
    I do have one on our boat, but I don't remember what size. If you call Harken I'm sure they can help you figure out exactly what you need.

    20160509_163624.jpg
     


    Last edited: Aug 16, 2017
  6. Jackdaw

    Jackdaw

    Joined Nov 8, 2010
    6,930 posts, 1,035 likes
    Beneteau First 36.7 & 260
    US Minneapolis MN & Bayfield WI
    That Harken one is the fanciest most expensive one possible. Look up the term on a chandlery site for simpler cheaper models.
     


  7. Reg M

    Reg M

    Joined May 21, 2016
    112 posts, 5 likes
    Hunter 31
    Ca Montague, Prince Edward Island Montague
    I purchased a Lewmar halyard restrainer for $30, it does not have a sheave, ot just has a curved shape to lessen friction. I will put it on after the boat is hauled and the mast is down. Today a friend helped me lower the genny then we tied a short of line between the swivel and the furler then hauled the halyard up tight. We then turned the swivel back and forth and we could feel rough spots which would indicate that the plastic ball bearings are elongated/disfigured. I will have to order new ball bearings. At any rate, after hoisting the genny again and doing some experimenting with the halyard tension we discovered that by slacking the halyard off just a little, thus easing the weight on the bearings, the furler works reasonably well. I will order the bearings but since it is easier to install them with the foil upright I may not get them in time to install before haulout. One little trick which we neglected to do while doing this little test is after discovering roughness in the bearings, take a cup or soof fresh water and splash it into the swivel thus lubricating the bearings. If the roughness goes away when the bearings are wet you know for sure the bearings are at least on their way out.
     


  8. SG

    SG

    Joined Feb 11, 2017
    414 posts, 44 likes
    J/Boat J/160
    US Annapolis
    One issue on the bearing is halyard tension. I tend to unload the halyard by easing it an inch or two when I'm not sailing the boat. That way the bearings and the sail isn't as tensioned when furled and un-used.

    Also, I think most sailors OVER TENSION their halyards. That just reduces performance in many cases. In heavier air, you obviously want more tension. Generally, except in heavy winds, you want just enough tension to do the job. Depending on the sail material, it's age and condition, etc. the difference can be an a couple of inches.

    It makes a big difference if you leave too much pressure on the torlon bearings (whether it's Harken, or not.) As I recall, ProFurls are more sensitive to wearing bear than Harken.

    Also, I think the roughing up of the bearings is function of not washing out the saltl, sand, grit, etc. out of the furling fittings routinely. They will last a very long time if you take care of keeping them clean.
     


  9. jviss

    jviss

    Joined Feb 5, 2004
    1,423 posts, 55 likes
    Tartan 3800
    US Westborough Westport, MA
    Or bearing wear, as the case may be.
     



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