New boat, help setting up mainsheet

Discussion in 'Trailer Sailors' started by Scandium, May 1, 2019. Add this thread to a FAQ

Tags:
  1. Scandium

    Scandium

    Joined Aug 16, 2018
    46 posts, 11 likes
    Seaward 23
    US Annapolis
    These are guarantied to be stupid questions, but I'm a 1st time sailboat owner with no IRL people to ask.. I believe I figured it out, but wanted to see if I'm making some mistakes in how I set up the mainsheet on my recently acquired boat. I got it on the water, but not been able to raise the sails yet. Possibly this weekend. There's been a myriad of little things I've fixed that it didn't quite seem like the PO knew what he was doing (and if I notice you know it's stupid..).

    The boat has mid-ish boom sheeting. And there is a U-shaped ring (forget the name) near the mast, I assume for vang attachment?

    - It came with two sets of lines/blocks things. So I'm thinking sheet, and boom vang. Does it matter which is what? See photos. It does look like solid blue was used as mainsheet. The other was buried under a bench, unfortunately don't have a better photo.
    - Solid blue is attached with carabiners. Works, but doesn't seem quite right to me.. Should I replace with shackles, or does it not matter? (Had a "WTF?!" when I saw the price of snap shackles..) The other at least came with shackles
    - There's a block on the boom, just aft of the mainsheet attachment point. Seen in the photo of solid blue. Any idea what this could be for? I'll have to investigate this further once i get the sail set up.
    Sorry for all the questions. Thanks!

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     


  2. Davidasailor26

    Davidasailor26

    Joined May 17, 2004
    1,652 posts, 401 likes
    Beneteau Oceanis 37 LE
    US Havre de Grace
    It looks like both are 4:1 with similar sized blocks, so the only difference would be the length of the line. You'll probably want the longer line for the sheet so that you don't run out when going down wind.
    Those carabineers don't look good to me. I don't know what load they're rated at but I'd be concerned using them with 4:1 blocks that could generate a good amount of force. I'll defer to other trailer sailors on what works best for rigs that get removed and reinstalled frequently, but I'm guessing that's not it. Something that looks like that from Home Depot advertises a working load limit of 280 lbs, which doesn't sound adequate for a 4:1 block.
     


    Scandium likes this.
  3. LakeShark

    LakeShark

    Joined Sep 15, 2016
    415 posts, 167 likes
    Catalina 22
    US Minnesota
    Ok I'll give this one a shot as I am a long time trailer sailer. The answer to your question is yes the 2 block and tackles are the vang and Mainsheet most likely. The set with the snap shackles should be the main sheet and the other the vang however check the length as the vang is likely much shorter. Snap shackles are $$ but you can buy cheaper ones at a horse tack shop or Amazon. There made in China and cheap so don't use them on critical things but a vang is a good place as if it come apart the mainsheet will certainly protect it from hurting anyone. Another good place for a cheap one is the Topping life (heck you could use the carabiners). I would though remove the carb beers and not use them on the blocks since there not the locking kind. If you do want carabiners inplace of snap shackles go to REI and get some good quality rock climbing ones. I have a hand full of them I used to climb with that have a 5K lbs working load and a breaking strength of 25K lbs. I have even used my old ones to pull cars out of the ditch in the snow. People always laugh when I pull them out but hey there rated for it! They all have double locks on them though and you cannot buy them at the local hardware store.

    As to the attachment point I may be mistaken but the track in the boom should be for your sail. Likely the block (picture with blue line and ? in it) is the outhaul for the foot of the sail and a line should attach to that swivel which appears to be on a slide. I am sure once you put up the sails everything will make since.

    Fair Winds!
     


    Scandium likes this.
  4. Scandium

    Scandium

    Joined Aug 16, 2018
    46 posts, 11 likes
    Seaward 23
    US Annapolis
    Thanks. Length of line is a good point. They both appear to be more than long enough, but I'll certainly uncoil and compare. The blue one is also pretty ratty looking so wouldn't mind switching.. I have the boat in a marina so don't need to take the sheet on/off all the time, but since it's right in front of the companionway it would be handy to be able to detach it and get out of the way when not underway. I'll use the snap shackles I have and maybe get some cheaper ones for the vang. The carabiners don't seem adequate. At least they're not rusted I guess.

    And not to be vain, but the carabiners also look ghetto and out of place :) A theme with getting this boat ready is my constant annoyance that people don't spend and extra 5% effort to do things right, rather than half-assed:banghead:(really the same is true for my house as well).
     


  5. DrJudyB

    DrJudyB

    Joined Jun 25, 2004
    350 posts, 260 likes
    Corsair F24 Mk1
    003 US San Francisco Bay, CA
    I would caution against using weak hardware to attach a vang. if a vang rips out from the mast during an uncontrolled gybes, it is very dangerous. Most carabiners shouldn't be used for the vang, IMO. They're probably fine for the topping lift and fenders.
     


    Jackdaw, Meriachee and Scandium like this.
  6. Scandium

    Scandium

    Joined Aug 16, 2018
    46 posts, 11 likes
    Seaward 23
    US Annapolis
    Certainly, I'll ditch the carabiners. I just don't know what's adequate, or ok, when it comes to shackles. I probably won't get shackles from ali express, but Defender has a Schafer unit for $95, and a no-name with same rating for $40.. Or a lewmar for $37! Is that one ok? How good do I need? I have no idea. (I know one is cast and one forget, but does it matter to me..?) I don't plan on storm sailing, or racing. So certainly don't need the best. I'll probably just get something that sounds ok, and upgrade if it breaks, lol
     


    Last edited: May 1, 2019
  7. LakeShark

    LakeShark

    Joined Sep 15, 2016
    415 posts, 167 likes
    Catalina 22
    US Minnesota
    Umm I might have missed something here but if your not trailering the boat all the time why use snap shackles at all? Just get regular marine shackles. Snap shackles work for things that are disconnected frequently for storage and things when trailering. That's why most trailer sailors like them along with Highfield levers for the rigging. If it's going to be in the water at a marina then rig it like a traditional sailboat with standard shackles etc...
     


    Scandium likes this.
  8. Scandium

    Scandium

    Joined Aug 16, 2018
    46 posts, 11 likes
    Seaward 23
    US Annapolis
    Well for one the traveler is right in front of the companionway. It can be in the way, and it interfere with the zarcor swinging doors that PO had installed (there are no hatch boards). So being able to detach the mainsheet to move it out of the way would be handy, at least at the bottom. But the vang does not need snap shackles, that's true.
     


  9. DrJudyB

    DrJudyB

    Joined Jun 25, 2004
    350 posts, 260 likes
    Corsair F24 Mk1
    003 US San Francisco Bay, CA
    Take a look at the Garhauer 25 blocks, with a built in snap shackle. https://shop.sailboatowners.com/prod.php?2700.

    For a small keel boat , Harken classic blocks have been used for years. For a small keel boat, they usually recommends a safe working load of 750-1000 pounds for mid boom sheeting.
     


    Scandium likes this.
  10. jssailem

    jssailem

    Joined Oct 22, 2014
    9,006 posts, 3,921 likes
    CAL 35 Cruiser
    US Salem, Moored Port Everett WA
    Lewmar makes good steel shackles, as does Wichard
    For a 23 foot (generally light weight boat with moderate forces) I would consider using Dyneema or Amsteel soft shackles. They are light weight, easy to make (about 20 minute), cost less than $5.00 to make, and will have breaking strength of 3 or more times that of a steel shackle. 3/16 Amsteel has a breaking load of 5500 lbs. The finished soft shackle has a breaking load of over 10,000 lbs.

    I use soft shackles to attach the jib sheets on my 35foot boat with a 148% genoa. Use them several years and if I see wear or a breakdown of the fiber, for under $5 I can afford to toss the item in the trash and make a new one.

    An idea for your consideration. While I was in the Chandlery getting one I met a racing sailor with a 20 foot dinghy. He was removing all of his steel shackles and replacing them with Dyneema soft shackles.
     


    Scandium likes this.
  11. Scandium

    Scandium

    Joined Aug 16, 2018
    46 posts, 11 likes
    Seaward 23
    US Annapolis
    Thanks, good points. I actually replaced the steel shackle the PO had on the jib sheet (ouch!) with a dynema soft shackle. Though I was too lazy to make one and bought a pair.
     


    jssailem likes this.


Gray ports and parts
The most popular port on boats built from the 70s into the 90s.
Sail Trim Chart and Guide
When it comes to sailing, as basic as salt and pepper and just as indispensable!
Gray Enterprises port gasket
Stop winter leaks. Compare our price!
NEW rigid hatch covers
Hatch protection like never before. Tough, secure, installs in seconds.