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Moving to Larger Boat

Discussion in 'Catalina 22' started by w4swk, Jul 9, 2018. Add this thread to a FAQ

  1. w4swk

    w4swk

    Joined Mar 23, 2015
    151 posts, 61 likes
    1991 Catalina 22 Wing Keel
    15202 US Nocona
    Hello All
    Haven't been on the forum lately....life has kept me pretty busy, but...we are still sailing!!! Sharlene and I have decided to move to a larger boat soon and hope to do some coastal cruising....Gulf Coast, Key West, maybe Bahamas. I realize this is the "22" forum but I also know some of you have owned bigger boats in the past. Maybe a few of you could chat with me about what to look for and maybe even a boat that you have owned in the past.

    I have read about this subject on some of the other forums and most posts degrade quickly into such comments as, "you're crazy if you don't buy a 7000 foot cutter, you should buy the same boat I have, don't do it if you didn't learn to sail from Capt. Bligh (Capt. Jack Sparrow taught me...LOL) blah...blah...blah. You guys have always provided solid data and input, so fire away!!!!

    Thanks
    Ken and Sharlene
     


  2. Roland5048

    Roland5048

    Joined May 12, 2004
    1,056 posts, 300 likes
    Hunter Cherubini 30
    US New Port Richey
    OK, I'll go first. How large a boat are you lookin' at? What's your price range? What's your experience in larger boats? Is this a long term live aboard situation? Lots of questions. No answers. More info needed.
     


  3. kloudie1

    kloudie1

    Joined Nov 6, 2006
    7,990 posts, 579 likes
    Hunter 34
    US Mandeville Louisiana
    Life is easier with shoal draft ! There are some really nice boats, the Hake Seaward RK's that are well thought out and geared toward coastal cruising... The 26 or the 32 seem to be fine for a couple.. Lots of shoal draft fixed keel stuff out there too.. Something in the 27-34 foot range that you feel comfortable with.. older end of the spectrum is lower cost, newer end is likely to have more amenities..
    The key is to visit boats that you are considering to get a better feel of what you need and what is on your "must have" list.. Good luck and have fun !
     


    Last edited: Jul 10, 2018
  4. w4swk

    w4swk

    Joined Mar 23, 2015
    151 posts, 61 likes
    1991 Catalina 22 Wing Keel
    15202 US Nocona
    Hi Roland
    Thanks for replying. I am looking at 30-35...we all want it for free(LOL) but I would like to find something around 30-35K. I am 101 and 103 ASA and have sailed boats from Sunfish up to a 47 FT Catamaran but have never owned a boat larger than my 22. We plan to spend about 6 mo. per year on the boat (so as to dodge hurricane season). I learned to sail a Lido 14 in 1989 and have been active since I foolishly launched my Windrose 18 at Dana Point (after one lesson) and began sailing up and down the coast (God truly looks after fools and little children!).

    Additionally, we are scheduled to get our ASA 104 this fall in Panama City with the good folks at Stem to Stern Sailing.

    Thanks,
    Ken
     


    Last edited: Jul 10, 2018
    kloudie1 and Will Gilmore like this.
  5. BigEasy

    BigEasy

    Joined Jun 21, 2004
    963 posts, 213 likes
    Beneteau 343
    US Slidell, LA
    After identifying “your” boat, see if you can charter a similar make and model for a weekend in the states. Consider it a sailing vacation and an opportunity to become familiar with the boat to ensure that’s really the boat that you want. Before purchasing my present boat, I was in a charter club for 6 years. I chartered the exact model that I presently own for about 30-40 days & nights. I knew exactly what I was buying.
     


    Parsons likes this.
  6. BigEasy

    BigEasy

    Joined Jun 21, 2004
    963 posts, 213 likes
    Beneteau 343
    US Slidell, LA
    Ken,
    After you do ASA 104, you should have the credentials to charter boats in the 30’ range. Emerald coast sailing in Pensacola has a variety of boats for charter. Couldn’t pick a better place to sail here in the states.
     


  7. jon hansen

    jon hansen

    Joined May 25, 2012
    1,025 posts, 489 likes
    john alden caravelle 42
    us sturgeon bay, wis
    [​IMG]
    alden mistral, yes i'm prejudice. great sailor, very strong.
     


  8. w4swk

    w4swk

    Joined Mar 23, 2015
    151 posts, 61 likes
    1991 Catalina 22 Wing Keel
    15202 US Nocona
    Hi BE
    Thanks for the positive comment! We did or ASA 101 and 103 with Stem to Stern in Panama City and greatly enjoyed our time there. When we decide to get the 104, the decision to return to the same school was a "no brainer"! The folks there are just fantastic!

    Ken
     


  9. jon hansen

    jon hansen

    Joined May 25, 2012
    1,025 posts, 489 likes
    john alden caravelle 42
    us sturgeon bay, wis
  10. w4swk

    w4swk

    Joined Mar 23, 2015
    151 posts, 61 likes
    1991 Catalina 22 Wing Keel
    15202 US Nocona
    That's a beautiful boat! Alden design makes it a great design, too! Originally, we considered a ketch, but i just can't warm up to a mast in the cockpit...probably shallow of me, but it's a personal preference.
     


  11. cb32863

    cb32863

    Joined Jun 29, 2010
    846 posts, 99 likes
    Beneteau First 235
    US Lake Minnetonka, MN
    I would suggest ASA 105 as well. If you are going to do coastal cruising, might as well get some coastal navigation training. The Beneteau First 36.7 is a sweet ride and quick too. Plus, they are still in business building boats.
     


  12. Roland5048

    Roland5048

    Joined May 12, 2004
    1,056 posts, 300 likes
    Hunter Cherubini 30
    US New Port Richey
    You may be able to bundle ASA 104 - 106. 105 is strictly navigation taught in the classroom. You then get to go out for a few days to practice and hone your skills in 106, Adv. Coastal Cruising. This is usually taught on 35 ft + boats. This should give you the experience needed to aid in your search for your own boat. See if this can be arranged on a couple of different type, makes, models of boats. Just don't get too enamored with the boat you learn on. Use that experience as a sort of base line.
    Lots of good advice here from the other posters. Good luck in your endeavor. Keep us posted. Don't hesitate to ask questions.
     


  13. Roland5048

    Roland5048

    Joined May 12, 2004
    1,056 posts, 300 likes
    Hunter Cherubini 30
    US New Port Richey
    Jon, that beautiful Alden looks like a yawl looking at where the mizzen seems to be located. Love the design. Except for the coach roof, looks like a Pearson Invicta.
     


  14. Parsons

    Parsons

    Joined Jul 12, 2011
    563 posts, 169 likes
    Catalina 36
    US Bay City, MI
    I'm not an expert, and I'm not going to say what type of boat you should buy, but I can offer some criteria that I found helpful in making my decision. First, realize that every boat is a compromise (comfort, costs, draft, etc.) and normally maximizing any factor is bad on the others. You've already answered your question about budget, and I suppose location will be US Gulf Coast. In any of this, there is no right answer, just choices. Also, you probably should talk this over with your crew, because nothing ends a party faster than a dissatisfied partner.
    1. How much do you like working on boats rather than sailing? Honestly, are you looking for a project or a sail-away, and can you afford it. I estimate roughly 10% of purchase price annually for maintenance and upgrades, but then again, I don't do the complex mechanical work.
    2. How do you (both) like to sail? Are you an aggressive racing type, a long-distance cruiser, or a Buffett-style beer-drinking sit-at-the-dock sailor. Be honest, because it determines the type of boat you will look for. There's no reason to spend big money on speed if you rarely leave the dock. A telling question -- on your current boat, how new are the sails and how full is the cooler?
    3. How much comfort do you want, and how long do you intend to stay away from home? Do you mind roughing it for a few days at anchor, or do you demand soft mattresses, hot coffee, and electric lights. Obviously the same person that puts up with "camping" for a night or two still wants a hot shower after a few days, so how long are you staying away from civilization.
    4. How safety conscious / risk averse are you? How frightened do you get when the winds start picking up, or something goes wrong and you have to limp back to port. Since you're planning to venture out into the Gulf and perhaps to the Bahamas, you'll probably want something that can deal with weather above a gale (sustained winds over 34 knots). If you are risk averse, you must setup to short-hand in that type of weather, and practice actually doing it. That means paying for stronger things and redundant systems than strictly needed, or required by law.
    Don't worry about training or the size of the boat. Just like a car, you will become accustomed to whatever boat you're on. Pretty soon, 30 or 40 feet just feels 'right'. You'll want some experience docking (the most stressful part of boating) and anchoring, if you're not used to doing that with a larger boat. Your favorite sailing school should have an ASA docking certification, which is a good little course for not much coin.
     


    FDL S2 likes this.
  15. w4swk

    w4swk

    Joined Mar 23, 2015
    151 posts, 61 likes
    1991 Catalina 22 Wing Keel
    15202 US Nocona
    Hello and thanks for good input!

    Rather than address each item as a bullet point, I will try a little better to describe my wife and I.
    We are retired and think of ourselves as "active adventurers". When we retired in 2010, we moved into a motorhome and traveled full time for almost 6 years. We have circled the U.S. perimeter twice on motorcycles...once in 18 days (my wife rides her own). She has ridden in rain, wind, we were even caught in a verified tornado once in South Carolina. During our rides, we would sometimes be forced to set up a tent for the night in cold, rainy weather. We own and fly 2 airplanes and are building a Zenith 750 STOL airplane. We have built our own 60x40 hangar including a loft apartment. As to the boat being a project or sail - away, I would say that we all want a deal, if a great boat comes along that needs a little pressure wash then great!!! Otherwise, we will keep looking for a sail away...price is always important but we should be able to pay a reasonable price.

    I mention these things as a way to address some of the great things you point out...We are not afraid of risk but must have some sense of safety to be so active and still make it to ages 63 and 54! And yes, a good craft beer is a great thing to have...at the end of a long day:beer:

    Thank you for great thoughts and ideas

    Ken
    P.S. Feel free to check out some of our travel activities at :
    http://kenshar.blogspot.com/
     


    Parsons and Gene Neill like this.
  16. BigEasy

    BigEasy

    Joined Jun 21, 2004
    963 posts, 213 likes
    Beneteau 343
    US Slidell, LA
    Ken,
    Does stem to stern in Panama City offer larger boats (>30’) for charter? Wasn’t questioning your decision to return there after having good experiences with earlier classes. Just curious if they have larger boats to charter after you obtain certification.
     


  17. LeslieTroyer

    LeslieTroyer

    Joined May 20, 2016
    1,771 posts, 617 likes
    Catalina 36 MK1
    US Everett, WA
    I went from a Catalina 22 in the 80’s to a Catalina 36 in 2015. Couple dinghy inbetween. Loving the 36. It was the Admiral that said 34-36’. Don’t live aboard but plenty do.

    Les
     


  18. Calif. Ted

    Calif. Ted

    Joined Jun 8, 2004
    2,147 posts, 152 likes
    Catalina 320
    US Dana Point
    I made a list of "Preferences"
    Lead fin Keel, little or no wood exposed to the weather, conventional main, dual spreader masthead rig, Yanmar engine, etc. your choices may be different, most people's are.
     


  19. w4swk

    w4swk

    Joined Mar 23, 2015
    151 posts, 61 likes
    1991 Catalina 22 Wing Keel
    15202 US Nocona
    Yes...we will obtain our ASA 104 on a Beneteau 41...it is also available for charter. Dale and Laurie are some of the nicest folks I have ever known.
     


  20. BigEasy

    BigEasy

    Joined Jun 21, 2004
    963 posts, 213 likes
    Beneteau 343
    US Slidell, LA
    Ken,
    I checked out Stem to Stern's website. Apparently, they only allow "captained" charters, where they allow you to charter the boat with one of their captains aboard. Nice for a day sail; however, you and the admiral really need to bareboat charter to gain experience after you get your ASA 104 certification. Big difference when you have a captain on board who is calling all the shots and probably docking the boat vs a bareboat charter where you have to make all the decisions and execute. In the beginning its more stressful to bare boat charter, but after you spend more time on a boat under your command your comfort level grows as you gain more experience. If you have interest purchasing a similar model boat, a weekend aboard the bare boat charter will give you ample time and opportunity to get a feel for how it sails, motors, and how to operate most of the onboard systems. Very good experience before buying. I am not advocating that you use Emerald Coast Sailing in Pensacola for chartering; however, you guys obviously like sailing on the Gulf Coast and ECSailing has 33 to 41 foot boats that can be either bare boat chartered or chartered with a captain. Check out their website. Rick & Peggy are very nice people to deal with also; they have been doing this for a long time.
     



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