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Moving boat to new slip. Dockline Questions.

Discussion in 'Ask All Sailors' started by pateco, May 14, 2018. Add this thread to a FAQ

  1. Gunni

    Gunni

    Joined Mar 16, 2010
    5,161 posts, 999 likes
    Beneteau 411 Oceanis
    US Annapolis
    Forward spring, aft spring always - keeps the boat on location, so your bow and stern lines just keep the boat lined up. Long, like Capta describes. What is a boundry line? In any case don't rig that Rube Goldberg bow line stuff your neighbors have, that is some seriously silly stuff. If you tie off to dock cleats make sure they are bolted with backing plates.
     


    JamesG161 likes this.
  2. Ron20324

    Ron20324

    Joined Jan 22, 2008
    6,174 posts, 565 likes
    Beneteau 323
    US Annapolis MD
    Gunni, the guy does what he has to do to make it work for him. His boat, his choice. You don't need to ridicule him just because it's not "Your way". Ease up - be nice.
     


    jwing and Doug4bass like this.
  3. Doug4bass

    Doug4bass

    Joined Jun 9, 2004
    608 posts, 62 likes
    Catalina 385
    US Marquette. Mi
  4. Will Gilmore

    Will Gilmore

    Joined Oct 19, 2017
    2,735 posts, 1,167 likes
    O'Day 19
    US Littleton, NH
    That 'U' configuration, you show, is mostly to put the dock lines within easy reach of the bowman when the boat comes in to tie up. There is some stretch added for tidal range, but there are simpler ways to do that. I like the idea of it. Because they are bow-in, the dockside bow lines are a long reach away. Less boathook work and no need for a dockboy.
    My question is also, what are the conditions there? Tidal range, etc. I also recommend lots of bumpers, especially between you and your neighbor.

    -Will (Dragonfly)
     


  5. Gunni

    Gunni

    Joined Mar 16, 2010
    5,161 posts, 999 likes
    Beneteau 411 Oceanis
    US Annapolis
    Gee Pops, don't think I ridiculed Chip, but if you say so!
     


    JamesG161 likes this.
  6. Don S/V ILLusion

    Don S/V ILLusion

    Joined Sep 25, 2008
    5,050 posts, 273 likes
    Alden 50
    US Sarasota, Florida
    There is no right or wrong way to do this. There is only personal preference and what works for you. Try different configurations to determine what works best for your need.

    As I mentioned earlier, we have similar docks at our marina and almost everyone configures their lines differently with effective results.
     


  7. pateco

    pateco

    Joined Aug 12, 2014
    2,098 posts, 549 likes
    Hunter 31 (1983)
    US Pompano Beach FL
    Pompano-Beach Tides.png

    This location is on a dead end canal off of the ICW.
    14th st canal.JPG
    The predominant average hourly wind direction in Pompano Beach is from the east throughout the year, averaging 9.8 mph in the fall and spring, and 7.4 mph in the summer.

    According to the Slip's owner we have 8 feet at the slip
     


  8. pateco

    pateco

    Joined Aug 12, 2014
    2,098 posts, 549 likes
    Hunter 31 (1983)
    US Pompano Beach FL
    I have revised my thoughts trying to get it a little more to scale, and adding some bumpers and my dink to the drawing.

    Possible dock line setup3.jpg
     


    Will Gilmore likes this.
  9. JamesG161

    JamesG161

    Joined Feb 14, 2014
    2,896 posts, 838 likes
    Hunter 430
    US Waveland, MS
    I tie my boat to allow an slight oval shape movement, this assures me no sediment build up for my 5' draft.
    We had a major North wind that drove the canal level down well beyond the low tide. People thought the boat was sitting on the bottom. I said no way. Why, because that oval shape movement basically "plows" a hole under my boat. My Zinc diver confirmed it.

    My shot at your "bow in" view.
    1) Finger pier side midships cleat "spring line". This the first docking line connected and last removed. This one line secures your boat and should be length set for tides only.
    2) Your post #13 Port side spring line, set to prevent bow/dock collision :plus:
    3) Both of your brown stern lines set for tide changes will stabilize your boat Port/Starboard swings.
    4) You don't need Red or Blue lines at all.

    Last comment is that a 3 foot tide change may cause the port side neighbor a problem if his boat's beam is wide.
    Jim...
     


  10. JamesG161

    JamesG161

    Joined Feb 14, 2014
    2,896 posts, 838 likes
    Hunter 430
    US Waveland, MS
    I would add the dinghy [post #28] at the end of the finger pier using the three bollards to tie it up, independently.
    Jim...
     


    pateco likes this.
  11. Gunni

    Gunni

    Joined Mar 16, 2010
    5,161 posts, 999 likes
    Beneteau 411 Oceanis
    US Annapolis
    I have watched three different boats careen out of control in the slipway and strike other boats which extend beyond their slip pilings. The further out, the more often they get struck.
     


  12. Davidasailor26

    Davidasailor26

    Joined May 17, 2004
    1,202 posts, 210 likes
    Beneteau Oceanis 37 LE
    US Havre de Grace
    That should be good. It'll help the boat stay close to the finger pier so getting on and off will be easier. Also if you have a right hand prop it will counteract prop walk in reverse.
    2 considerations about putting the dinghy in front of the slip - It will push the boat back possibly bringing the widest part of the boat behind the finger pier, making boarding a bigger step; and if it makes your boat stick too far out of the slip your neighbors might not like that (plus having the stern stick into the fairway makes it a target for others docking).
     


  13. pateco

    pateco

    Joined Aug 12, 2014
    2,098 posts, 549 likes
    Hunter 31 (1983)
    US Pompano Beach FL
    1) Finger pier side midships cleat "spring line". This the first docking line connected and last removed. This one line secures your boat and should be length set for tides only. (I Currently have no Midships cleats at all)
    2) Your post #13 Port side spring line, set to prevent bow/dock collision (I was planning on adding at least one Midships Cleat) I found just one almost matching one in a boat part consignment store last year.
    2018-01-14 17.06.19.jpg

    3) Both of your brown stern lines set for tide changes will stabilize your boat Port/Starboard swings. (Agreed)
    4) You don't need Red or Blue lines at all. (If I forgo the boundary lines RED, I think I still need Bow Lines BLUE)
     


  14. JamesG161

    JamesG161

    Joined Feb 14, 2014
    2,896 posts, 838 likes
    Hunter 430
    US Waveland, MS
    A Big OUCH!
    I wonder how you do a quick single side docking for fuel or eats?

    My midships cleat is almost a necessity. We do single line berthing with that cleat, but ours are OEM.
    Someone used our "boarding line" that is extra line[at midships] to pull the boat to the finger pier. That extra line was left tied up to a Bollard cleat. Tide went out... Guess which cleat gave up?
    errr... not the Hunter OEM cleat.
    So the backing plates are designed for the weight of your boat on a new cleat.

    _____
    Without midships spring lines....
    1) Brown sterns for sure
    2) Blue Bow lines for sure, but I don't think a "spreader" is needed.
    3) To board, release Port side Blue and pull with Starboard Side Blue to finger pier
    4) To dock, throw Bow Blue to landlubber or kiss dock and grab the Starboard side Blue. Set the Browns, exit boat, set the Blues.
    ____
    The real "kicker" is a bit of Trigonometry, since I don't see the Actual Scale of your boat and the width and length of your berth. That Trig is the High and Low tides and the angle of the Brown and Blues.
    For example: At Mid Tides, your boat may hit the finger pier or the neighbors boat, with the slack in the lines.
    Jim...

    PS: I had to do Trig for Hurricane Nate's expected 10' surge and allow enough line for my boat to rise, without hitting the Bulk heads on either side of the Canal, after the surge passed.
     


  15. pateco

    pateco

    Joined Aug 12, 2014
    2,098 posts, 549 likes
    Hunter 31 (1983)
    US Pompano Beach FL
    That is the reason for the red lines. they are not tied to the boat but instead to the pilings, and (via the blue bow lines) the seawall cleats. They act to coral the boat at mid tides keeping it in the center of the slip. The below pic is of a friend's boat at a similar slip at low tide. He has let the boat drift over to the pier for boarding by loosening the port bow line.

    2018-05-12 15.24.31.jpg

    I need to take another pic with it at its centered position, and one at mid tide. I will also take some more exact measurements the next time I am there.
     


  16. JamesG161

    JamesG161

    Joined Feb 14, 2014
    2,896 posts, 838 likes
    Hunter 430
    US Waveland, MS
    Not too bad of an idea, if they are independent, non stretching 3/4 inch lines that are fixed in an Fence type especially on the Port side. In other words, straight and not part of boat lines.
    But it may take 2 lines on each side and have anti chaffing on the lines. Think of a boxing ring type ropes.
    then Fenders on the port side, since the finger pier is your block.
    ____
    If you get the Bollard to Bollard [berth Width], Port Bollard to Dock, Stbd Bollard to Finger, , length of finger pier, and Finger pier height above water [known tide at the time], measurements, we can do the Trig in a PM if you need help.

    But it looks like you won't need the Reds, at first guess.:pimp:
    Jim...
     


  17. dLj

    dLj

    Joined Mar 23, 2017
    232 posts, 63 likes
    Hunter 30
    US Snug Harbor, Lake Champlain
    Not much tidal change, pretty secure location, not sure about he currents, but sure looks to me like the perfect location to try hanging weights on your springs. Not having center cleats is something I'd address as soon as I could, but heck, it's your boat.

    In your diagram, I'd add a second spring on the other side too. With two springs and weights on both, your boat may just sit there very nicely... Takes a bit to get it all adjusted just right but once you do, it's pretty neat how it keeps your boat from moving around... Good luck with the move and take photos once you are set up. It will be interesting to see how you finally get settled.

    dj
     


  18. pateco

    pateco

    Joined Aug 12, 2014
    2,098 posts, 549 likes
    Hunter 31 (1983)
    US Pompano Beach FL
    What would you use as weights?
     


  19. dLj

    dLj

    Joined Mar 23, 2017
    232 posts, 63 likes
    Hunter 30
    US Snug Harbor, Lake Champlain
    I used square cobblestones. They were easy to make a rope cradle for and had good density and water resistant.

    dj
     


  20. jmce1587

    jmce1587

    Joined Mar 20, 2011
    274 posts, 35 likes
    Hunter 31_83-87
    US Kemah
    google “Johnson toe rail folding cleat” for mid center cleat. Have em on my H31
     



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