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Mid-Boat Cleats

Discussion in 'Catalina 310' started by Frank H, Jun 15, 2018. Add this thread to a FAQ

  1. Stu Jackson

    Stu Jackson

    Joined Feb 26, 2004
    19,849 posts, 531 likes
    Catalina 34
    224 CA Maple Bay, BC, Canada
    I've always thought of chocks as being like line cutters only with slightly rounded edges. I find them dangerous. My boat is 32 years old, I've had her for 20. There is NO gel coat damage from using our bow & stern cleats in our slips or when traveling in all these years. Our cleats are in similar positions to those on a C310.
     


    MikeToronto and Parsons like this.
  2. Parsons

    Parsons

    Joined Jul 12, 2011
    535 posts, 153 likes
    Catalina 36
    US Bay City, MI
    Now this is exactly the type of real-world practical information that I come here for. Thanks @Stu Jackson for information that I can use, and saves me years of experimenting!
     


    jssailem likes this.
  3. Alansails

    Alansails

    Joined Oct 3, 2011
    557 posts, 64 likes
    Anam Cara Catalina 310 Hull #155
    US Lake Erie/Catawba Island
    We use a midship cleat coming into the dock on the port side, First Mate/Wife grabs the breast line and attaches it to the midship cleat than I get the stern line and attach it, I can than power up to bring the bow to the port so First Mate/Wife can get the port side bow line and attach that, I ease the throttle back and kill the engine, Bow swings to Starboard and First mate/Wife gets starboard dock line and attaches that and we are done!...
    All that simple-Well most of the time,, :):biggrin::yikes:
     


    jssailem likes this.
  4. MikeToronto

    MikeToronto

    Joined Mar 28, 2018
    7 posts, 0 likes
    Catalina 310
    315 CA Toronto
    So, since we've talked about the mooring lines - can someone share the specs for theirs? I am thinking double braided nylon, either 1/2" or 5/8", thimble in the eye for the mooring ball side where the shackle goes, but what about the length? 7'?
     


  5. pateco

    pateco

    Joined Aug 12, 2014
    2,013 posts, 525 likes
    Hunter 31 (1983)
    US Pompano Beach FL
    On the H31 the cleats are right on the rail, no chance to chafe.

    Anchors.jpg
     


  6. Parsons

    Parsons

    Joined Jul 12, 2011
    535 posts, 153 likes
    Catalina 36
    US Bay City, MI
    I'm a 'slip' person, but I am curious about this answer. I would think that the line from mooring ball to eye would be similar to the specifications for an all-chain anchor rode with snubber. Since three-strand nylon gives much more stretch, I would think that it would be better than double-braid between chain and boat. Please, enlighten me sailors that are on the ball!
     


  7. jviss

    jviss

    Joined Feb 5, 2004
    2,603 posts, 258 likes
    Tartan 3800
    US Westport, MA
    That's a weird point of view, I must say. Maybe it's related to the type of boat? If you have teak toe rails, you absolutely need chocks, or you will quickly ruing the wood, unless, perhaps, if you fit metal anti-chafing strips.

    This one is very smooth, nicely made, forged bronze that's chrome plated. It also holds the mooring line in. There was only this one, to port, so I bought one for the starboard side, too, as we are moored via a bridle to the mooring chain.

    Chocks have been around as long as boats! Yes, avoid sharp ones (duh!).
     


  8. jviss

    jviss

    Joined Feb 5, 2004
    2,603 posts, 258 likes
    Tartan 3800
    US Westport, MA
    It's up to the person who maintains the mooring, in my case, my marina. I don't own the mooring, I rent it. But same one for 18 years. Ours is a bridle, and I think 3/4" nylon three-strand (it's certainly nylon three strand, just not sure of the diameter - but it's big).
     


  9. jviss

    jviss

    Joined Feb 5, 2004
    2,603 posts, 258 likes
    Tartan 3800
    US Westport, MA


  10. jssailem

    jssailem

    Joined Oct 22, 2014
    5,595 posts, 1,892 likes
    CAL 35 Cruiser
    US Salem, Moored Port Everett WA
    I use 9/16 braided nylon rope for my dock lines. I find the while the rope is a bit larger than used by most of the boats docked near me, I have weathered several strong winter storms and not had any trouble with my lines. Braided nylon gives me about 15% stretch (elongation) yet has a good feel, is protected from chafe due to the braided cover, and has a 25% higher tensile strength (at about 11,000 lbs) than 3 strand of the same diameter at about 7500 lbs.
     



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