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how worried should I be?

Discussion in 'Ask An Oday Owner' started by sshev, Jul 8, 2018. Add this thread to a FAQ

  1. sshev

    sshev

    Joined Jun 25, 2018
    7 posts, 0 likes
    Zuma, Hobie Holder 14 14
    US Iowa
    I just picked up a '77 Daysailer II with trailer for $300, so I'm not too deep into this project. Cosmetically it looks to be in decent shape, hull looks good, no obvious structural issues. The sails, mast, boom, blocks and pulleys all complete and in good shape. The shrouds are good, the forestay is rusty and needs to be replaced as do the mainsheet and halyard, but here's my concern. This boat hasn't been in the water for two years. Been sitting in the previous owners driveway in NW Iowa. When I hooked it up to trailer it home, I lifted the tongue and thought....wow, this boat is really heavy. No light bulb went off at that point. Got it home, tipped the tongue up high and opened the drain plug. It ran a steady stream for longer than I was willing to watch. I have no idea how many gallons came out. The tongue weight is considerably less now. I imagine the centerboard tunnel and pivot bolt gaskets will be a first place to look for the source of potential leaks, but what I'm really worried about is what damage may have been done by holding that much water through several Iowa winters with freezing and expansion? Like I said, I don't see any exterior indications of cracks or problems. What do I need to look for? thanks in advance.
     


    Last edited: Jul 8, 2018
  2. SUMB44

    SUMB44

    Joined Jun 19, 2018
    51 posts, 7 likes
    O'day 20
    US Port Tobacco
    Some sort of portable x-ray device probably. I've read of people putting paints/inks/dyes around obvious problem areas like drains and such to see if they run/smear due to water leekage/seepage... is there a cuddy or other type of enclosure?
     


  3. Jackdaw

    Jackdaw

    Joined Nov 8, 2010
    9,652 posts, 2,706 likes
    Beneteau First 36.7 & 260
    US Minneapolis MN & Bayfield WI
    Its most likely rainwater and snow melt. Frozen water in a boat only is an issue if it fully contained by structure that cannot deal with it expanding while freezing, which mostly means pipes, hoses, and fittings. Loose water in the bilge can normally freeze and not damage anything.
     


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  4. Claybury

    Claybury

    Joined Jun 11, 2018
    9 posts, 2 likes
    O'day Widgeon
    Boat Us Lower Stanchfield
    On small boats it depends on how it was stored. If it was bow high the ice can expand between the outer and inner hull. Look for gel coat cracks that look like it pushed out rather than inwards on the cockpit floor and transom areas. If it's cracked but not soft you should be OK. If the boat was stored on it's side check for cracks or separation at the deck joint.
    Rot in the transom, floor, and fairlead wood blocks is a concern.
    On the plus side, if it wasn't dripping before the drain was pulled she's watertight up to the level the water was.
     


  5. sshev

    sshev

    Joined Jun 25, 2018
    7 posts, 0 likes
    Zuma, Hobie Holder 14 14
    US Iowa
    don't see cracks or deflections that look like pressure from the inside, the shell was doing a fine job of being watertight from the inside out...so I'll take this as positive. thanks
     


  6. Apex

    Apex

    Joined Jun 19, 2013
    819 posts, 111 likes
    Oday 28
    US Traverse City
    plunk it in the water and watch for sinking your first couple of times out....JD is spot on, water in bulge shouldnt be an issue. ENJOY
     


  7. Sunbird22358

    Sunbird22358

    Joined Jun 2, 2004
    1,719 posts, 53 likes
    Oday Day Sailer
    US Wareham, MA
    The only concern that I might have, or at least the most important concern, is whether the water and dampness may have affected the plywood block under the cuddy deck that the mast step and CB control blocks are screwed to. Assuming that your boat was not one of the "Monday, Friday or day before/after a Holiday" boat like mine seems to have been, even if the plywood has rotted out you may be more or less OK as long as the Factory positioned the plastic pipe that transfers the down pressure of the mast step to the bottom of the boat directly under the mast step. Mine (as were several others that I've heard about?) had the pipe too far forward and the cuddy decking had cracked through. Open one of the cockpit inspection/bailing ports and stick your phone or digital camera I there, take a few pictures looking fore and aft, if you don't see any wood fragments, then see if you can see the underside of the cuddy decking near the maststep. If it all looks intact, you're OK.
    Repairing that area is not terribly hard if you have ever repaired fiberglass, and even if you have not, carefuly adding a metal plate under the maststep may be all the repair you need.

    You will enjoy the DS II! I've now had mine for 22 years after buying her from a neighbor who had left the boat covered in his Sister's backyard for 5 years. He covered the boat, so no floods in the bilge, but there were some dirty stains in the cockpit (SoftScrub w/Bleach took care of those!). For a Great source for parts, check out D&R Marine (www.drmarine.com) Rudy at D&R was the Parts Dept. Manager at O'DAY from 1973-89 and now runs a little "Mom & Pop" store selling O'DAY Parts. Best to call him to follow up on orders or to ask questions, (508) 644-3001 as he often doesn't get to answer e-mail ,and a phone call works best.

    Private Message me if you would be interested in an Expanded version of the DS II Owners Manual.
     

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  8. sshev

    sshev

    Joined Jun 25, 2018
    7 posts, 0 likes
    Zuma, Hobie Holder 14 14
    US Iowa
    thanks! I got the boat home and stored safely in a shed. I've got another sailing option for the near term...this is going to be something I work on over the next year or so. I'll get it up in my shop soon and open the observation ports and check out how bad the centerboard tunnel and pivot bolt area is, and look forward to the area under the mast as well. appreciate the response.
     


  9. Stache

    Stache

    Joined Jul 14, 2018
    8 posts, 4 likes
    O'day Widgeon
    n/a US Enfield, NH
    Think about it this way. You had that much water inside the boat and nothing was leaking out. I'd say the hull is sealed. I have often tested for leaks in an old boat by "filling" it with a garden hose to the water line. No leaks out? Prolly no leaks in.
     



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