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Heaving to

Discussion in 'Day Sailers' started by BobbyFunn, Nov 26, 2017. Add this thread to a FAQ

  1. BobbyFunn

    BobbyFunn

    Joined Apr 16, 2017
    83 posts, 42 likes
    Hunter 170
    US FL Tampa
    It was a calm day on the water 8mph with gust to 15mph, a perfect day to try out new things.

    Today it was heaving to. I tried the standard approach last spring. This is where the jib is backed after a tack and the rudder is turned in a attempt to tack back resulting a balanced hove to position. It didnt work well and we ended up fore reaching instead. Wasnt really sure what we did with the main nut i think there was tension and lifting airflow on it.

    Today it started again with the backed jib again and the turned rudder, but this time i let the main go out over the lee side. As if going dead downwind.

    That worked great. There where several good gusts and we just drifted along for about 5-10 minutes snacking on a lunch. I think this technique is called tbe rod stop. We did not bother to place a preventer on boom since it was behaved.

    Afterwards we blew the jib and reset it, pulled in the main back, and centered the rudder. Back to sailing.

    Pretty exciting.
     


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  2. Brian D

    Brian D Moderator

    Joined Feb 17, 2006
    3,585 posts, 382 likes
    Lancer 27PS
    US Oceanside, Ca MCB Camp Pendleton, Ca KF6BL
    Kudos, Bobbyfunn. Sounds like you had a "funn" day. :)
     


  3. justsomeguy

    justsomeguy

    Joined Feb 20, 2011
    5,697 posts, 547 likes
    MacGregor, Island Packet 35
    US Tucson, AZ/San Carlos, MX
    Oh, brother. :rolleyes: :biggrin:
    A great technique to know, Mr. Funn.
     


  4. Will Gilmore

    Will Gilmore

    Joined Oct 19, 2017
    588 posts, 147 likes
    O'Day 19
    US Littleton, NH Littleton, NH
    Oh wait, there's an emoji for this.
    It's always fun when I get to use an emoji for the first time. :worthless:
    It sounds awesome, now it'd be cool to see it. So next time, as they say in the Kentucky Fried Movie, "with feewing."
    :thumbup:
    - Will (Dragonfly)
     


  5. John Tubb

    John Tubb

    Joined Feb 14, 2017
    443 posts, 77 likes
    O'Day 25
    US Huntsville, AL Guntersville, AL
    Congrates, I use it for lunch and swim time.
     


  6. Bruce Conron

    Bruce Conron

    Joined Nov 6, 2012
    2 posts, 1 likes
    Hunter 27
    CA Penetang ON
    Am reading Tom Cunliffe's The Complete Yachtmaster, 9th edition (2017) just now. In Chapter 4, "Basic Seamanship Under Sail," he has an excellent treatment on heaving to in three pages, complete with illustrative diagram and photo. In fact, the whole book is excellent, appropriately written for any sailor who has advanced beyond novice.
     


    Will Gilmore likes this.
  7. Roland5048

    Roland5048

    Joined May 12, 2004
    810 posts, 180 likes
    Hunter Cherubini 30
    US New Port Richey
    Good going. That's one of the most important maneuvers to master. But, don't get hung up on just one sail set when hove to. Practice in different wind and current speeds. The main is your friend here. Like you found out, different main settings give you different angles to the wind. Work both main and jib to get a feel for how your boat reacts in differing situations. And, make sure you are not bearing down on a lee shore, shoal, boat, etc if hove to for long. We are just getting into the best time of year for sailing. Fair winds.
     


  8. JimInPB

    JimInPB

    Joined Aug 22, 2017
    237 posts, 45 likes
    Hunter 212 & 170
    us Florida West Palm Beach
    Thank you Bobby, that is very good information to have. I tried to get my H170 into irons when I had a MOB situation a month or two ago & it didn't work out for me. I'll have to try it again with the main all the way out like you had it. I'm not sure that I tried it that way.
     


  9. Ron20324

    Ron20324

    Joined Jan 22, 2008
    5,717 posts, 396 likes
    Beneteau 323
    US Annapolis MD
    Every time I go out with crew I tell the crew to stay seated, but the one steering to "come about". Strange, but the crew always wants to move for action. I tell them to be as they were. They are always appreciative to have heaved to after I explain some times when you'd want to do it. NO pictures needed.
     


  10. peacheykeen

    peacheykeen

    Joined Dec 8, 2013
    23 posts, 2 likes
    Hunter 34
    Ca Torointo
    The secret to heaving-too is to first slow the boat down through the tack so there is very little "way on" as the back winded jib comes through the wind. To do this make sure the main luffs and keep it luffing by easing the sheet . As the jib back- winds, hold the boat in that shallow angle until the wind pushes the jib and bow over, THEN and only then, gradually turn the wheel into the wind to balance the drive of the back winded jib against the lift of the rudder.
    You should settle on a beam reach, more accurately, forereaching -perhaps at a knot, jib back winded, the main luffing and the wheel locked to windward..........as far as necessary to keep the boat forereaching. The only complication here is that the main may still drive the boat too fast if it's against the swept-back spreaders and shrouds, causing the boat to tack back. If so reduce the drive of the rudder by easing the wheel and or get the main down if you're going to heave-too for a while.
    It's all about BALANCE.
     


  11. Paul356

    Paul356

    Joined Jun 7, 2004
    238 posts, 1 likes
    - -
    US Milwaukee
    I have found my 356 will lie calmly even in heavy wind and wave if I sheet the jib tightly, let the main out so it is well into a luff (maybe out past the quarter), bring it up close to the wind and lock the wheel at whatever point is needed to stay there. The jib keeps some pressure and footing on; the main keeps it from coming about. It's amazing how calm that can be. I use that position to reef (non-furling main), for example, or if I need to run below. This basic position also works with the jib furled, with the main in just a bit tighter, tho still luffing.
    As someone said above, experiment and find a balance. Traditional heaving-to does not always work with our fin keels and spade rudders, but there is going to be a way to make it work, as Bobby found for his needs.
     


  12. shemandr

    shemandr

    Joined Jan 1, 2006
    2,962 posts, 260 likes
    Marblehead Skiff 14'
    US Greenport, NY Greenport, NY
    How did it work out for the MOB?!
     


    justsomeguy likes this.
  13. JimInPB

    JimInPB

    Joined Aug 22, 2017
    237 posts, 45 likes
    Hunter 212 & 170
    us Florida West Palm Beach
    It worked out OK. I doffed the jib, single handed up next to her with just a reefed main & did a one handed grab as I luffed up & pulled her aboard. She still had her fishing rod in her hand & still had her fish on. Mahi was on the dinner menu that night.

    I just could not get the boat to stay in irons, so I had to do a quick grab during the few seconds that I was able to slow up. On the first pass, I tried to get in irons, but the boat just wanted to fall off to a reach, almost as soon as it had stopped. On the second pass, I timed the tack from port to starboard as the MOB was on my port side. I did it just like I was rounding a weather mark, except I held the boat head to wind a little longer & did a fast grab with one hand while the tiller was on the other.
     


    Last edited: Nov 27, 2017
    justsomeguy likes this.
  14. shemandr

    shemandr

    Joined Jan 1, 2006
    2,962 posts, 260 likes
    Marblehead Skiff 14'
    US Greenport, NY Greenport, NY
    I was sort of joking about the MOB. Glad you retrieved your MOB and the Mahi Mahi. That's some gal who held onto the rod while being MOB! I'd be tempted to call her a keeper but I guess you already have.
     


  15. BobbyFunn

    BobbyFunn

    Joined Apr 16, 2017
    83 posts, 42 likes
    Hunter 170
    US FL Tampa
    Just pictures of three guys drifting on what looks like a jacuzzi, enjoying some mozzarella and prosciutto. :cool:

    The real story was at the boat ramp just after we splashed. Tide was low, huge pontoon boat is loading up. Guy goes on crooked and figures he can just backup the truck and trailer and realign the boat then drive off.

    Nope.

    He falls off the end of the ramp. His flogrown sticker on his pickup helps him not one bit.

    After 5 or so yanks i figure hes about to loose his axle or hitch. Its totally locked on the edge of the ramp. Even taking the pontoon off doesnt help.

    Owners freaking out like he just woke up to dead hokr next to him. After he gets his cool he walks to the end of the submerged trailer.

    This water is nasty. Its not tampa bay, not even the manatee river, no this is a canal for a subdivsion built 50 years ago that leads to both. It smells bad if i lower the centerboard too early. Lets call it fartwater ramp.

    Presumably, at the end of the trailer he falls off and is in the prop wash zone, looks like its about chest deep at low tide. In what must have been an agonizing act of desparation he takes a deep breath and dissappears for 5 seconds. Trailer wiggles in what must only have been laughter that only a stuck trailer can make.

    He comes back up. His buddy is in tbe truck. He yells for him to try again, nothing. Truck advances, stop cold, then spins on the slick ramp.

    He goes under again, but not before telling his buddy to try agian, while hes freediving in fartwater ramp propwash.

    I offer a suggestion. How about using the pontoon to lift the trailer? This pontoon has got to be 30 years old with 40 year dock lines. I presume the docklines have been kept moist for the last 5 years becasuse if they dry out they will most certainly turn to dust. The longest one is at most 5 feet long.

    I help steady the pontoon while he grabs some 3/8 inch 3 strand nylon from his anchor box. Under he goes agian and back up. He ties a granny knot on a ring and using brute human strength pulls straight up. "Go!,Go!", he yells. The fbomb that goes out beckens the subdivision dogs like an arctic howl of the wild.

    Nothing. Three more times this guy thinks he can dead lift a pontoon trailer with doubled up 3/8 inch 3 strand nylon anchor rode.

    I offer a suggestion. What if instead of pulling straight up you go around that cleat over there, then each time the bow goes down with waves you can lock those gains?

    5 minutes later my crew and i are hoisting sail in the river and we're watching a dry pontoon disappear.
     


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  16. BobbyFunn

    BobbyFunn

    Joined Apr 16, 2017
    83 posts, 42 likes
    Hunter 170
    US FL Tampa
    You have well trained jib crew. Same thing here. Crew was confused, took a couple times before they wouldnt respond to the jib situation. Like saying, "hey this time, leave the keys in tbe car when you shut the door". They look at you like you are mad as a hatter.
     


  17. BobbyFunn

    BobbyFunn

    Joined Apr 16, 2017
    83 posts, 42 likes
    Hunter 170
    US FL Tampa
    I get one reef. I can easily see reefing and getting some sail off the spreaders if it picked up consistently over 10 knots. The main sail is saggy so getting it flat is getting harder. Main flogs some with the Rod Stop so reefing would be important. One other ace up my sleeve is the centerboard. Next time id like to see what centerboard adjustments do. When we are motering ill adjust the centerboard so that the bottom trailing edge is just level with hull, this gives us good control while going foward. I bet that would give us good traction like a full keel.
     


  18. JimInPB

    JimInPB

    Joined Aug 22, 2017
    237 posts, 45 likes
    Hunter 212 & 170
    us Florida West Palm Beach
    Post #15 had me just about rolling on the floor, busting a gut.
    That was the best chuckle that I've had in a while.
     


  19. Will Gilmore

    Will Gilmore

    Joined Oct 19, 2017
    588 posts, 147 likes
    O'Day 19
    US Littleton, NH Littleton, NH
    Let me guess, he had about 30' of anchor rode 'cause he's never going to anchor in water more than 30' deep.
    - Will (Dragonfly):laugh:
     


  20. JimInPB

    JimInPB

    Joined Aug 22, 2017
    237 posts, 45 likes
    Hunter 212 & 170
    us Florida West Palm Beach
    Several days ago, I was listening to a guy named Fatty, as he discussed his chosen methods for getting a boat into irons. One detail that I did not expect was his use of the topping lift to trim in the top third of the main. Does anyone else play with the topping lift when trimming a boat into irons?
     


    Last edited: Dec 11, 2017 at 3:56 AM
    Will Gilmore likes this.

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