H37c generators

Discussion in 'The Cherubini Hunters' started by Jaxg, Jul 10, 2019. Add this thread to a FAQ

  1. Jaxg

    Jaxg

    Joined Jun 30, 2019
    2 posts, 0 likes
    Hunter 37 Cherubini
    Free spirit Us Jacksonville
    what is a realistic (no major mods, no crazy money) way to use a generator while on the hook with my 1980 h37c. Thinking about one of the small Honda’s sitting in the cockpit at night or even hanging in a custom built box from the davits off the back. Talking river and flat water anchorages, no crazy seas to worry about. Some people just love air conditioning here in FL.
     


  2. Hayden Watson

    Hayden Watson

    Joined Apr 5, 2009
    749 posts, 224 likes
    Catalina '88 C30 tr/bs
    US Oak Harbor, WA
    I carry 2000 watt gas generator. I have a Sunbrella cover for it and lash it to the front of the mast when traveling. When I need to use it, I place in on the floor of the inflatable and connect it to the shore power chord. Being down in the bottom of the inflatable isolates its vibration from the boat. Sound is mostly line-of-sight so it also quiets it a lot for both me and my neighbors.
     


    dLj and Jaxg like this.
  3. Benny17441

    Benny17441

    Joined May 24, 2004
    5,798 posts, 433 likes
    CC 30
    US South Florida
    Honda eu2000i is the standard. The unit maxes out at approximately 13.3 Amps. It may have 20A and 30A receptacles but the output is still 13.3A. That means a couple of things, 1) you cannot use all your appliances at once. Find out and know their power draw and decide which you may want to use simultaneously. From experience I can tell you it is fine to use a couple of cabin lights, the battery charger and a TV. You want to turn the A/C ON turn off all the others. The maximum size of A/C unit that see run on the H2000 is a 12,500 BTU unit. While the unit draw is easily handled by the generator the draw demand for start up power when cycling can exceeds its capabilities. Electric motors, in this case the compressor, pump and fan will require a surge from 3 to 5 times the running draw. The other related characteristic is fuel consumption; the Honda comes with an ECO mode which will adjust the throttle to the power draw. The inboard fuel tank for the generator is approximately 1 gallon and in eco mode can give you between 6-7 hours running time but if you are running a 12,000BTU A/C you may likely have to turn the ECO mode Off and will only get a run time of 4-5 hours. It is not pleasant having to get up in the middle of the night to refuel the generator. There are some 3 gallon auxiliary tanks that will piggy back with the internal for a total of 4 gallons. One important safety issue when using the generator is to have a Carbon Monoxide Alarm. The wind can shift and blow the exhaust to wards the cabin creating a gas poisoning hazard. For A/C units up to 24K BTU you can run two generators in parallel. Honda sells the harness to combine two generators. The cheapest way to get maximum use of the generator is to use low draw appliances. Many sailors have used a 120V dorm refrigerator and a 5K Btu window A/C unit. The generator is portable so you can take it camping or use it home during a power outage.
     


  4. jssailem

    jssailem

    Joined Oct 22, 2014
    9,591 posts, 4,307 likes
    CAL 35 Cruiser
    US Salem, Moored Port Everett WA
    :plus: This is a true scenario. I got an opportunity to experience it first hand with my sailing mates @LeslieTroyer and @Ward H. It was blowing 25plus. Temps were below 20 degrees F. Snow was blowing up from the south east. We were sheltered in the lee of a 40foot high rock face just 6 feet from the boat. Secure to the dock on the other side. Went to bed about 22:30 and we were rudely awakened by a screaming alarm about 02:35.
    first one then both CO alarms went off. Les climbs out into the wind blown snow to shut down the Honda. The wind had shifted and the exhaust found a path into the cabin.

    During our Extreme Cruise this past winter.
    IMG_5134.JPG
    IMG_0139.JPG
    IMG_3145.JPG
     


    Ward H and Jaxg like this.
  5. jviss

    jviss

    Joined Feb 5, 2004
    3,317 posts, 447 likes
    Tartan 3800
    US Westport, MA
    It's so disappointing that there isn't an economical, drop-in or maybe "semi-portable," small, water-cooled, diesel generator. I think 2kW would be fine for many folk, 3kW would probably take over the market.

    I confess that among the things I hate about boating is when someone cranks up their Honda generator on their sugar-scoop transom, or deck, or flybridge, in an otherwise tranquil anchorage. Now, when I look for a spot to anchor, I studiously avoid being near a boat with a Honda on it, or with gas cans on deck. I truly hate the obnoxious hum that breaks the tranquility. On the other hand, while I've noticed the "plop, plop" of inboard, water cooled generators going on nearby boats, it is not disruptive at all.

    But thank goodness for Honda - their products are pretty quiet, and they seem to strive to achieve this characteristic. I've actually confronted a nearby boater who was running a cheap-o 3kW generator mounted on some homemade, Rube Goldberg mount higher than their transom, broadcasting an intolerable racket, like the hammers of hell, across the entire anchorage. Air horn beats generator. When it finally stopped, other boaters applauded and sounded their horns in celebration.

    About charging batteries with them: unless you are running a 50A+ AC charger, I think you are fooling yourself. Cruising with a plan to charge batts using your typically 10 or 20A shore power charger would, I think, require you to run the generator eight hours a day, no? Hair dryers and vacuum cleaners, microwave ovens, coffee makers, toasters? A good inverter works just fine, although it probably exceed the cost of an EU2000i, and requires a good house bank, good, high current alternator and smart regulator, and attention to battery management.

    Regarding danger, diesel exhaust contains about 1/28th the carbon monoxide of the exhaust of a gas engine. So while it's not harmless, it's generally much less dangerous than gas exhaust. This week I was appalled to see an anchored sailboat with a Honda generator running on the foredeck, with the forward cabin hatch wide open, yawning at the generator, swallowing all of the exhaust. A true Darwin-award candidate. God save the innocent victims of this fool!

    So, there you have it. Some people don't like your generators. I totally get it in Florida, and other places, where A/C is almost a requirement. But then, maybe all the boats are buttoned-up and insulated from the noise.
     


  6. dLj

    dLj

    Joined Mar 23, 2017
    408 posts, 175 likes
    Hunter 30
    US Snug Harbor, Lake Champlain
    Jviss, when I lived in Europe, small diesel generators were easily available. I don't know why here in the US they don't seem to be on the market. I also quite agree that the sound of a diesel generator is preferred over a gasoline generator, plus they are quite fuel misers. Although to that point I must say the Honda's are excellent.

    I dislike having multiple fuels on board and particularly dislike having gasoline on a sailboat. I wish we had a small diesel generator available. I've actually tried to buy one in Europe and ship it over, but I think I'd have to go there to execute that. Ahhhh, now that sounds like a great idea! Hahaha

    dj
     


  7. jviss

    jviss

    Joined Feb 5, 2004
    3,317 posts, 447 likes
    Tartan 3800
    US Westport, MA
    DJ, any info on those European diesels? I'll be in Czechia in September....
     


  8. jviss

    jviss

    Joined Feb 5, 2004
    3,317 posts, 447 likes
    Tartan 3800
    US Westport, MA
    BTW, I agree on gasoline on boats. I have two fuels, diesel and propane. The propane is very carefully managed, in a OEM locker, solenoid, and a fairly sophisticated control with sniffers, etc. Maybe if we could find a tiny, water cooled gas engine that could be converted to propane?

    The DoD had some Honda EU1000's converted to diesel, with high-current, DC output. I saw one on eBay for about $1000, I'm kicking myself for not buying it. But then, it's still an air cooled generator.
     


  9. dLj

    dLj

    Joined Mar 23, 2017
    408 posts, 175 likes
    Hunter 30
    US Snug Harbor, Lake Champlain
    Jviss,It's been a long time since I've been back stateside so the cobwebs of time have occluded a lot of specifics. I'd suggest to stop into a good industrial supply house and ask what they recommend. I'd always had very honest feedback there from the pros.

    I'd be very interested in hearing what you find out.

    dj
     


  10. dLj

    dLj

    Joined Mar 23, 2017
    408 posts, 175 likes
    Hunter 30
    US Snug Harbor, Lake Champlain
    Just saw your second post... It's my understanding that any gasoline engine can be converted to propane. I've not seen one of these small engines converted, but I used to have friends that would convert their pick-up trucks to be dual-fuel vehicles, propane and gasoline. It's my understanding it's a question of managing the air/fuel ratio properly. But my buddies used to do it seemingly without much ado..

    dj
     


  11. dLj

    dLj

    Joined Mar 23, 2017
    408 posts, 175 likes
    Hunter 30
    US Snug Harbor, Lake Champlain
    Oh, as a side note - at one time I had a boat that was all diesel, including cook stove. I'll never go back to that set-up. No matter how good I got at running that stove, the boat always smelled of diesel... It seems the propane/diesel mix is the best way to go. I wish electric could arrive to the level I'd require...

    dj
     


  12. jviss

    jviss

    Joined Feb 5, 2004
    3,317 posts, 447 likes
    Tartan 3800
    US Westport, MA
    We love cooking on gas on the boat, as we only have electric at home.
     


  13. dLj

    dLj

    Joined Mar 23, 2017
    408 posts, 175 likes
    Hunter 30
    US Snug Harbor, Lake Champlain
    I totally agree! Perhaps I should clarify - I'd wish electric would get to the point where I find it sufficient. Then I'd go probably electric/propane! LOL I totally love cooking in propane! I then might only go to total electric if it was clearly making my boat completely energy independent - and capable of running under motor for days on end, if needed...

    dj
     


  14. jviss

    jviss

    Joined Feb 5, 2004
    3,317 posts, 447 likes
    Tartan 3800
    US Westport, MA
    Back to the OP's question, regardless of whether the noise is an issue, the biggest concern about a portable generator is where the exhaust ends up. That should concern not only your cabin, but the cabin of the boat anchored behind you, too, if it's a tight anchorage. Safest place, it seems to me, would be on a sugar-scoop transom, if you have one. I would be scared running it in the cockpit. How about putting it in the dinghy and using your shore power cord, as Hayden suggested?

    Makes one think: wouldn't it be great if one had a combination outboard motor and generator? Water cooled, fairly quiet (some, anyway), and far enough away from the cabin to be safe burning gas.
     


    Last edited: Jul 14, 2019 at 2:15 PM
    Hayden Watson likes this.