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Freezer condensation on salon cushion 2002 Hunter 356

Discussion in 'Ask A Hunter Owner' started by TrueNorthMarine, Jan 5, 2018. Add this thread to a FAQ

  1. TrueNorthMarine

    TrueNorthMarine

    Joined Jan 5, 2018
    1 posts, 0 likes
    Hunter 356
    US Kemah
    I am having an issue where the wood in between the freezer box and the salon setee cushion condenses and soaks the cushion. I saw on an older forum post that mentioned there were issues with these boats having freezer/condensation issues, does anyone know how Hunter repaired vessels with this issue?

    Thanks a lot!
     

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  2. Ron20324

    Ron20324

    Joined Jan 22, 2008
    5,961 posts, 478 likes
    Beneteau 323
    US Annapolis MD
    My first thought, and as I did, put a vent in there.
     


  3. Crazy Dave Condon

    Crazy Dave Condon

    Joined Jun 8, 2004
    6,143 posts, 433 likes
    -na -NA
    US Anywhere USA
    You may want to look up in the archives under Jim Seamans (JAVA) who had a 356 and experienced that problem. Not sure if he reported his fix.
     


  4. chuckwayne

    chuckwayne

    Joined Mar 20, 2004
    1,381 posts, 30 likes
    Hunter 356 and 216
    US Portland, ME
    the "repair" consisted of adding more insulating foam around the freezer box using the aerosol spray in foam home insulation. It mostly eliminated the problem, but we still get some condensation there in humid, hot weather (2 weeks in early august in Maine)
     


  5. Jerry Clark H356 SV Persi

    Jerry Clark H356 SV Persi

    Joined Mar 3, 2003
    607 posts, 38 likes
    Hunter 356
    US Grand Rivers
    I’ve not had the problem in my 2003. Expanding Foam Insulation should fix it “Great stuff”available at Lowes.
     


  6. Hunter Ad Bot

    Hunter Ad Bot

    Joined Oct 27, 2016
    0 posts, 10 likes
    US Seattle
    Hunter striping decals

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  7. Crazy Dave Condon

    Crazy Dave Condon

    Joined Jun 8, 2004
    6,143 posts, 433 likes
    -na -NA
    US Anywhere USA
    Chuckwayne and Jerry Clark. Thank you for advising. I still miss that dear friend. I hear Joan is doing well.
     


  8. markwbird

    markwbird

    Joined Nov 26, 2012
    772 posts, 134 likes
    Hunter 34
    US Berkeley
    More insulation and/or less humidity in the salon. Does this happen in the winter and the summer? Do you keep your boat air conditioned in the summer when it is stored? I think I would start with trying to improve the insulation as much as I could and then think about controlling the humidity in the salon with a heater in the winter and A/C in the summer.
     


  9. chuckwayne

    chuckwayne

    Joined Mar 20, 2004
    1,381 posts, 30 likes
    Hunter 356 and 216
    US Portland, ME
    Mark,
    That would help; when Escape was in a slip I could run the AC and dry her out, but she's on a mooring now - and this is Maine so we keep the winter humidity down by freezing the boat on the hard ;-)
     


  10. Jerry Clark H356 SV Persi

    Jerry Clark H356 SV Persi

    Joined Mar 3, 2003
    607 posts, 38 likes
    Hunter 356
    US Grand Rivers
    Crazy Dave:
    I just missed meeting Jim and Joan when we had our boat in Punta Gorda winter of 13/14. They were visiting with Seadaddler there and we couldn’t get our schedules coordinated. Jim was a great contributor to this forum as has been Chuck Wayne and Nick. The 356/36 is a very dear boat to all of us.
     


  11. Crazy Dave Condon

    Crazy Dave Condon

    Joined Jun 8, 2004
    6,143 posts, 433 likes
    -na -NA
    US Anywhere USA
    @Jerry Clark H356 SV Persi
    You missed a tremendous person. I can remember from his first boat he bought from me, helping out at boat shows, visiting at home and the list goes on. I guess I was the first when he got sick and prayed for him to recoup. I miss that friendship and boy he made a lot of friends. For close friends of Jim, Joan is fine and she has his phone.
     


  12. chuckwayne

    chuckwayne

    Joined Mar 20, 2004
    1,381 posts, 30 likes
    Hunter 356 and 216
    US Portland, ME
    Jerry, Jim was going to visit Maine some years ago and I told him if he was in Portland stop by - one day there he was, walking down the dock! lucky I had cold beer on board, we shared some great conversation
     


  13. Jerry Clark H356 SV Persi

    Jerry Clark H356 SV Persi

    Joined Mar 3, 2003
    607 posts, 38 likes
    Hunter 356
    US Grand Rivers
    Chuck: One of these days I’m Going to look you up when in Maine. I have a consulting project in Kittery that should start construction next year. Not sure how many site trips I will make yet, but plan on flying into Portland when I do. Hope to finally meet you too some day. These forums have forged friendships without ever meeting and that is one great thing about them.
     


  14. chuckwayne

    chuckwayne

    Joined Mar 20, 2004
    1,381 posts, 30 likes
    Hunter 356 and 216
    US Portland, ME
    That would be great, Jerry! looking forward to meeting you! We live in Danvers, MA, about 30-40 minutes south of Kittery, and most weekends we're in York, the next town north from Kittery. Escape is in Falmouth Foreside, just north of Portland. My schedule is pretty flexible, so let me know your plans and we can try to meet.
     


  15. Jerry Clark H356 SV Persi

    Jerry Clark H356 SV Persi

    Joined Mar 3, 2003
    607 posts, 38 likes
    Hunter 356
    US Grand Rivers
    Will do Chuck. I do Envelope Commissioning and this one is for a new Dental Clinic at Kittery for NAVFAC. It hasn’t bid yet, so may be late summer before construction starts and then a while before they get to my first observation trip. I will definitely keep you updated on it and would love to get together. My plan is to fly into Portland for these trips. My usual trip is in one day, overnight, visit the site and fly back out the next day.
     


  16. chuckwayne

    chuckwayne

    Joined Mar 20, 2004
    1,381 posts, 30 likes
    Hunter 356 and 216
    US Portland, ME
    Looking forward to it! What's Envelope Commissioning? I Know the DoD loves to throw out new terms, but that's a new one to me (after 22 years consulting for the DoD!)
     


  17. Jerry Clark H356 SV Persi

    Jerry Clark H356 SV Persi

    Joined Mar 3, 2003
    607 posts, 38 likes
    Hunter 356
    US Grand Rivers
    Chuck: You might be sorry you asked about commissioning so I hope this isn’t too lengthy an explanations! This is what is Envelope Commissioning. I’m an Architect, been actively practicing since 1971, licensed in 33 states and have worked on a few international projects. My experience is on over 1300 public and private projects worth several billion dollars. I have my own Architectural firm that my Architect son primarily runs now and I have a couple of clients I still work with in addition to this commissioning work. I am affiliated with a firm called ICE that is me and other engineers in the other disciplines outlined below.
    Over the past 15 years or so we have seen deteriorating quality in construction of commercial buildings while at the same time a need for energy reduction and more emphasis on green construction has been growing. Out of that experience new private and DOD standards for energy consumption and emphasis on life cycle costs have led to requirements for all systems in buildings including the envelope to meet water and air infiltration and exfiltration standards. This new field called Commissioning was born out of this need to assure we were getting what was being paid for.
    Commissioning is the term now used for providing this third party oversight for the entire process and includes the envelope, HVAC, plumbing, electrical, vertical transportation, and low voltage systems and controls. I work with a group of other engineers in each of these disciplines as the Architect responsible for my portion ie the Envelope. The envelope includes all exterior surfaces, water proofing, slab, exterior walls, glass, doors, windows, louvers, roofs, etc. The problems generally occur at the interfaces of these different systems. We look for bad detailing, possible condensation, proper flashing, compatibility of materials and other small and large details that make the end product function per the standards. I deal with reviewing other Architect’s design and details at three stages during design and preparation of the drawings and specs needed for the project to assure that the design standards are being met. We are independent of both the Architects, Engineers, the government, and the Contractors so we pull no punches in our reviews. This process is intended to produce a building that is what the taxpayers actually paid for versus what was paid for in the past, but not produced. The process actually works pretty well and is verifiable and measurable. Commissioning is not used on small projects and most of the ones we do are in the 30 to 50 million range and involve complex buildings such as medical facilities,and dental clinics. I have 7 current projects active. I am in the testing phase on a 55 million dollar medical/dental clinic facility at Seymour Johnson in NC. I have 6 others just wrapping up the drawing spec phase, including the one at Kittery. They are 30 to 50 million medical/dental clinics. Three others are at Camp Lejuene and 1 at Camp Pendleton, CA.
    During construction, I make site inspections periodically to look at mockups of the systems and the actual construction to make sure they are complying with the original design. At the end, Air and water leakage tests are conducted by third party testing labs to simulate real life conditions that we oversee and validate,the results. We pressurize the building and introduce a known cubic feet per minute of air and measure the rate that is lost. For each square foot of exterior envelope they are allowed .25 cubic feet per minute. We also use thermography to assess leakage. Water testing is also conducted using either exterior fans blowing water at a known speed and pressure against interfaces of masonry/glass, other joints etc. for a specified period of time with failure of the components actually leak water or sometimes we use vacume and negative pressure to pull water through the interfaces. Any leakage during the time range is a failure and they do fail sometimes. They are retested at Contractor expense We stay with it until these items are corrected. If the government will maintain them, then we as taxpayers get many years of low life cycle cost, thus saving us all a lot of tax dollars and the assurance we got what we paid for. I also enjoy it a lot and it takes my level of experience for it to work.
     


  18. chuckwayne

    chuckwayne

    Joined Mar 20, 2004
    1,381 posts, 30 likes
    Hunter 356 and 216
    US Portland, ME
    Thanks, Jerry! very interesting - very similar to the Systems Engineering Management I used to do on major defense systems; my team was responsible for requirements analysis, specification development, procurement, contractor oversight and acceptance.