Registered users don't see ads

BVI's to St.Pete Florida

Discussion in 'Destinations' started by Southpaw, Feb 6, 2017. Add this thread to a FAQ

  1. Southpaw

    Southpaw

    Joined Jul 19, 2015
    60 posts, 4 likes
    Beneteau 343
    US BVI
    My wife and I will be going down soon to get our boat and bring it home. We have never done a long passage before. What are some of the must have on the boat for the passage that I might have missed. We are planning to from the BVI's strait to T&C then maybe through the old Bahama channel to Key west or through the Bahama's depending on weather.

    Thanks,

    Joey
     


  2. Kings Gambit

    Kings Gambit

    Joined Jul 27, 2011
    2,015 posts, 220 likes
    Bavaria 38E
    US Ventura Harbor
    If you don't say what you have, then how would anyone know what you might be missing? What's the longest non-stop passage you've ever made?
     


  3. Bill Roosa

    Bill Roosa

    Joined Jun 6, 2006
    6,714 posts, 76 likes
    Hunter 40.5
    US Harrington Harbor North, MD
    A sleep plan is helpful, also enough food and water, weather routing and choice of time of departure to miss bad weather, rescue beacon, abandon ship plan, alternate routs thought out and decision points made so you don't have to get into the "well if....." mode.
     


    BrianRobin likes this.
  4. Benny17441

    Benny17441

    Joined May 24, 2004
    4,883 posts, 201 likes
    CC 30
    US South Florida
    How soon is soon? This is not the time of the year for lengthy passages in the area. Your sail plan sounds a little ambitious for a short handed crew with limited experience doing long passages. I would suggest loosening up the schedule to take shorter legs of no longer than 2-3 days between Islands. Crew exhaustion will present your largest peril. Try to enlist additional crew preferably some with experience.
     


  5. Southpaw

    Southpaw

    Joined Jul 19, 2015
    60 posts, 4 likes
    Beneteau 343
    US BVI
    Some of the equipment we have is epirb,plb, inReach,extra line, rescues tape,boom preventer,tools,handheld gps,extra set of sails,extra belts,extra fuel,& extra water. We are starting next week. We are planning to both stay up at night and take shifts during the day sleeping. If need be we will have spots picked out to stop at.
     


  6. Kings Gambit

    Kings Gambit

    Joined Jul 27, 2011
    2,015 posts, 220 likes
    Bavaria 38E
    US Ventura Harbor
    I don't know the expected sailing versus motoring time for this route, so take that into consideration. I'd take half-a-dozen fuel filters; say four primary and two secondary in case of fuel contamination or particle re-suspension which has shut down many diesels from filter clogging trying to run in lumpy conditions. Also, of course, be set up to change them out, even in low light. That brings up my usual concerns about lighting and personal torches. Each crew member should have a personal light kept with her or him at all times. If the engine compartment is not well lighted a head lamp can be useful working in there where the primary fuel filter is normally installed. For personal lights, I recommend underwater (dive) lights that you can find at dive shops in case someone unexpectedly gets drenched at night and the light gets wet. (Or, it gets dropped or soaked in some water.) For entering new anchorages at night you should have a 1,000,000 candlelight spot operable from the cockpit and the foredeck, even in rain.

    I've had friends making passages where they challenged their bilge pumps just keeping up with water coming in via portlights, hatches, and cowl vents, etc., and other places on deck. I carry a large tube of silicon grease to apply to leaky seals of the portlights and hatches to stop water ingress. Also, be sure you can seal your cowl vent holes from the outside with the manufacturer's cover. Generally, in moderate to rough conditions, you should not have to open cockpit lockers to get to critical spare lines or tethers; so, they should be mounted on the rails. It helps if they are labeled for a specific function (say, preventer). Anything put on the rails, even "temporarily", should be lashed; so carry short (2 or 3-ft) lengths of lashing line that are easy to keep with you, etc. You should have an in-line pump to transfer diesel fuel from your jerry can to the diesel fill of the boat. (Rather than trying to do it the bubba way of standing up and pouring into the fill via a flimsy funnel while trying to hold on to the boat.:yikes:) Carry a couple of "multi-use" 3 to 5 gal buckets with lanyards that you can puke or piss in if required so it's not necessary to lean over the rail or go below while on watch.

    I'm sure there's more, but I think you get the obvious picture here. Keep water out of the boat; keep important lines and tools, even spares, handy; and don't find yourself trying to do something important, especially if urgent as well, in poor lighting or outright darkness, etc.;)
     


    Last edited: Feb 7, 2017
    TEM58 likes this.
  7. Benny17441

    Benny17441

    Joined May 24, 2004
    4,883 posts, 201 likes
    CC 30
    US South Florida
    One more thing is becoming visible to traffic. Carry lamps powerful enough to illuminate the sails to provide better visibility when encountering traffic. Remember a cruise ship can come over the horizon and be at your position in approximately 10-15 minutes. A radar reflector can help but they offer no guarantees. Never assume that a vessel in open seas has a watch. Regarding a two person shorthanded crew there is a warning to be considered; should one become sick the other will be overwhelmed in handling the boat and nursing the other crew member. Watch the weather and procure the means to get frequent updates. Sail the weather and never the schedule.
     


  8. JRacer

    JRacer

    Joined Aug 9, 2011
    302 posts, 23 likes
    Beneteau 310
    US Wichita, Kansas Cheney KS (Wichita)
    VHF with AIS?
     


  9. Kings Gambit

    Kings Gambit

    Joined Jul 27, 2011
    2,015 posts, 220 likes
    Bavaria 38E
    US Ventura Harbor
    Yeah, this should be rule No. 1!:yeah:
     


  10. shemandr

    shemandr

    Joined Jan 1, 2006
    2,673 posts, 143 likes
    Marblehead Skiff 14'
    US Greenport, NY Greenport, NY
    Extra prescription glasses if you need them.
     


  11. Jerry Clark H356 SV Persi

    Jerry Clark H356 SV Persi

    Joined Mar 3, 2003
    520 posts, 19 likes
    Hunter 356
    US Grand Rivers
    Recommend you set up Jackeline's and have two tethers each. My cruising rule is if in cockpit NO MATTER HOW GOOD THE WEATHER IS, you are tethered to a hard point. Don't unhook one without hooking up the other one first. If outside cockpit - one in cockpit tethered and other one on Jackeline -NO EXCEPTIONS. NO ONE LEAVES COCKPIT if other one is down below. Keep one tether on something before changing the other one. This assumes that you have inflatable PFD on and with harness.

    Also instead of a pump for fuel transfer I use a shaker siphon hose and carry two on board. They are cheap and you can get on Amazon. Keep in large ziplock bags with paper towel inside to soak up excess diesel. Also take a box of latex gloves and wear them while dealing with fuel. Keeps the diesel smell off of you and can help avoid seasickness from diesel smell. They are fast - you jiggle it and once flowing 5 gallons will transfer in 1:40 seconds.

    For weather, I highly recommend SailFlow Pro version. Watch it now and every day to get a feel for what is happening and keep updating whenever you can get updates via cell or wifi.

    Also take clothes to stay dry and warm. It gets cold out there this time of year even in Key West waters.

    You should also,use some rope and a shackle to secure your anchor from coming off and reeling chain out. If you get in pounding conditions, the action of the waves can cause your anchor to overcome the power of the windlass and will unroll. Tie a rope to your anchor cleat and have a shackle to clip onto the chain that is easy to come on and off. We had that happen once in 12 foot waves coming east to Key West from Dry Tortugas in a rental IP380.. It is easy to clip it where it won't happen and damn hard to deal with once it has come loose in those kind of conditions. If it happens once to you, you will never let it happen again.

    Have a great trip!
     


    Last edited: Feb 11, 2017
  12. Kings Gambit

    Kings Gambit

    Joined Jul 27, 2011
    2,015 posts, 220 likes
    Bavaria 38E
    US Ventura Harbor
    Personally, I don't like the disposable latex gloves on the boat; they're not durable enough for anything but very delicate work. It's better to use cotton-lined, reusable latex gloves. I think those are also called canner's gloves or dishwasher's gloves. That said, none of the gloves I've tried have worked that well when trying to replace standard fuel or oil filters, or even to transfer fuel. What has worked to keep the diesel smell off is to saturate the hands with Eucerin cream before handling containers where there could be contact with oil or diesel fuel. It's the dryness of the hands which soak up the fuel making it hard to wash off afterward. So, let 'em soak up the cream first and if there's contact with the fuel afterward it's fairly easy to wash it away with soap and water. This allows you the use of your fingers to do manipulations to benefit the task at hand.:dancing: Much faster and easier than messing with gloves.
     


    Last edited: Feb 11, 2017
  13. John Tubb

    John Tubb

    Joined Feb 14, 2017
    213 posts, 21 likes
    O'Day 25
    US Huntsville, AL Guntersville, AL
    So any update?
     


  14. Southpaw

    Southpaw

    Joined Jul 19, 2015
    60 posts, 4 likes
    Beneteau 343
    US BVI
    We made it to our new dock for now in St. Pete on Thursday morning at 5:11 am. I will post more when we get settled in and have time to set down and write it down
     


  15. SFS

    SFS

    Joined Aug 18, 2015
    935 posts, 144 likes
    Hunter 31
    US Tampa Bay


  16. John Tubb

    John Tubb

    Joined Feb 14, 2017
    213 posts, 21 likes
    O'Day 25
    US Huntsville, AL Guntersville, AL
    Congrats!
     


  17. Justin_NSA

    Justin_NSA

    Joined Jul 7, 2004
    3,476 posts, 267 likes
    Hunter 30T
    US Wichita, KS
    Congrats Joey. Put up some pics and some good stories when you can!
     


  18. Southpaw

    Southpaw

    Joined Jul 19, 2015
    60 posts, 4 likes
    Beneteau 343
    US BVI
    We started our journey on 10 February. While we were still at conch charter we provision the boat and left from Conch on the morning of 12 February to sopers hole west end Tortola. We cleared out on the 12. We got up on the morning of the 13 and dropped our lines from the mooring ball at 7:30 am for the TCI.. Along the way to TCI we had two different pods of dolphins join us one pod had 50-60 dolphins in it by the Puerto Rican trench. While the wife was sleeping the second pod of dolphins decided to put on an acrobatic show for me and were dumping 10 foot out of the water. As I scrambled for my phone and realized that it was up in the cockpit with me the whole time,the dolphins show ended. Another neat thing was the breakers to see a shallow spot of water out in the middle of the south Atlantic and to have waves breaking in the middle of the ocean was quite spectacular . As we got closer to the TCI we were able to see whales. To see the whales blow their air spout and the water to go 10 to 15 foot in the air and watch them roll for ever and then see their tail was quite amazing.we considered ourselves quite lucky to see the whales. We are arrived at South Caicos, cockburn harbor at 3:30 am on Friday the 17th. We left cockburn harbor on the morning of the 18th for Providenciales it was nerve-racking because the water was so skinny and the coral heads that you had to dodge. We anchored out the first night with only a foot of water under the keel. The next night we went into Southside marina because of high wind coming and to clear out. We clean out on the 20th and anchored out. We left on the morning of the 21st at 8:00 am for the keys. On the morning of the 23rd at 1:30 AM we had to reef the main sail down to the second reef due to wind. At 2:20 AM we had to take the main completely down because we were experiencing 34+ kn winds,rain and highly active seas. This was my wife's 10% shear terror moment last for five hours until sunrise. When we got close to Florida we got caught in the golf stream and the winds and current work against us so instead of going to Key West we ended up going to marathon and stayed at Burdines. We arrived at Burdines on the 26th at 10 AM. We tried to call the 1800 # to check in either no avail. so we got on the bus to Key West so that we could go to customs to check in. They would not talk to us without the clearing in number that we could not get because nobody would answer the phone.very funny now but very stressful then. Customs agent finally said he try to manually put it into the system and it worked to manually clear us in. We left on the 28th at 12:30 PM from Burdines marina on marathon missing fat Tuesday celebration because we had to hurry up and get to St. Pete due to a cold front coming down . After leaving Marathon for hours on then we had to dodge Crabtrap buoys and just when you thought they were all gone there's a whole bunch more halfway to Saint Pete we lost our win and had to motor the rest of the way. We went under the skyway at 2:39 AM between two cruise ships and a huge barge coming out of the channel being pushed by a tug .We arrived at our dock in Saint Pete at 5:11 in the morning.
     


    Justin_NSA and kloudie1 like this.
  19. kloudie1

    kloudie1

    Joined Nov 6, 2006
    7,025 posts, 220 likes
    Hunter 34
    US Mandeville Louisiana
    Congrats on a fine ride !
     


  20. JRacer

    JRacer

    Joined Aug 9, 2011
    302 posts, 23 likes
    Beneteau 310
    US Wichita, Kansas Cheney KS (Wichita)
    Quite an adventure, glad you made it safely.
     



Turn any toilet into a Raritan for a fraction of the cost
The Raritan LBA matches your existing bowl with the pump/plumbing of a PHII or PHC. save!
Gray Enterprises port gasket
Stop winter leaks. Compare our price!
Ready-made sheets and halyards
Now faster than ever, our calculator tells you what sizes you need.
Mainsail covers
Pre-patterned mainsail covers to fit your boat