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1st Post... 1st Large (to me) Sailboat... Hunter 28.5 or Hunter 33

Discussion in 'Ask A Hunter Owner' started by wsmac, Feb 23, 2017. Add this thread to a FAQ

  1. wsmac

    wsmac

    Joined Feb 16, 2017
    134 posts, 23 likes
    Hunter 28.5
    US Humboldt
    Hello.
    This is probably the typical newbie... "What boat should I buy?" post, but hopefully I can clarify that a bit? ;)
    .
    First, with my budget, I realize I am in the market for a boat that will need some work done to it... but hopefully no major or catastrophic repairs.
    Secondly, I am not looking for any of you to tell me which one to get... I'm up for the sharing of some personal experiences with each and some personal opinions, which I will add to all the other information I've been gleaning from online sources and my own inspections. I wouldn't want you to shoulder all that burden by yourselves! hahaha
    .
    My plan is to liveaboard alone(with some weekends/trips with the girlfriend and her 2 kids) and work on my coastal (West Coast of Northern California) sailing skills. Eventually I would like to take trips up to Alaska and down to Mexico/Central/South America... but perhaps not necessarily on my very first cruising boat... perhaps yes?
    .
    In my little area of the world(I have searched inland, south, and north into the next 2 states, even!), I am getting close to narrowing down my choices to 2 boats... both boats will run me below $15K
    .
    A 1985 Hunter 28.5 that I finally went below decks yesterday. Shoal keel. This will be the cheaper of the two. There are the usual issues of parts being slightly loose with tension/pressure... like mounts for rigging, stanchions, drips from the v-berth hatch, head not having been pumped out for at least 3 months, as well as the engine being removed and a new Thunderstruck 10kW electric motor and parts sitting inside waiting to be installed (batteries are in there already but not wired up).
    Overall... for the price he says he's willing to come down to... this could turn out to be a very good deal.
    Size-wise inside, with it's layout, I could live in that based upon prior land experiences in my life. :)
    I did not notice any large soft spots on deck. One of the plastic 'cap' rings for a through hull above waterline (vent for the galley sink?) was sitting on the dock so since I'd be inspecting all through hulls anyway, this one will definitely get replaced.
    He's had one of our local divers clean the bottom, and I plan on asking the diver if he recalls anything about the bottom when he did the job.
    I can dive on it and look the hull over from underwater... or motor it (has an outboard on a swingarm attached to the transom) over to where I can get it hauled out (in & out for approx $360... $30/day to sit on the hard) and see what it really looks like.
    .
    The other boat is either a 1982 or 1983 Hunter 33 (owner said built in 82 but registered as 83?).
    I will be stepping on deck tomorrow as well as below deck. I have been topside once so far for a cursory look around with the owner's permission. This one, too, I can move over to the lift and have it hauled out for a price.
    .
    This boat has a soft spot over the cabin which looks like it might be leaking from around the mast step. It'll be interesting to see how it looks from the inside, down the bulkhead and into the bilge.
    One wooden handrail is loose aft.
    There are some of what I feel are usual cosmetic details that can be worked over.
    This has it's original motor in and working.
    This one is currently twice the price of the 28.5
    .
    Both boats have adequate sails... but I haven't had a chance to see them in their entirety.
    All running rigging for both boats are aged a bit... look fine for sailing our little bay... but for serious coastal sailing, I'd replace it all.
    Anchors are included with both... can't remember which has what.
    .
    After I look at the 33 tomorrow (hopefully less rain and a bit more time to stick my head, light and mirror in all the nooks&crannys)... I plan on revisiting the 28.5 next week for a more thorough 'poking around'... yesterday was only good enough for a history lesson on the boat from the owner, and some crawling around inside.
    .
    Again... any comments/information pertaining to these two boats will be appreciated, mulled over, diced&sliced, and sifted into the mix of what I already have.
    I don't want anyone to lose sleep over their posts here... "GEE! I hope I gave him the right advice... if not... I feel I'd have to just up and buy him a new boat!" ;)
    The pressure is OFF! lol
    Thank you in advance... probably repeated abundantly throughout this thread.
    .
    and
    .
    WELCOME TO ME! WEEEEEEEE!
     


    Last edited: Feb 23, 2017
  2. Justin_NSA

    Justin_NSA

    Joined Jul 7, 2004
    4,544 posts, 677 likes
    Hunter 30T
    US Cheney, KS
    The larger boat would be appreciated much more with 4 aboard. I don't mind mechanical issues but soft spots just turn me off. Neither boat sounds attractive. If it were me, I'd keep looking.
     


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  3. Scott T-Bird

    Scott T-Bird

    Joined Oct 26, 2008
    3,306 posts, 425 likes
    Starwind 27
    US Barnegat, NJ
    It's a good thing you came to this forum before you purchased your fixer-upper project boat! As most of us will attest, fixing up a project boat can be significantly more expensive than budgeting a significantly higher purchase price to obtain a used boat that is well maintained, upgraded, and suited to your desires. It sounds like you don't really have a clue yet. Don't take that as an insult ... almost all of us purchased our first boat before we had any clue about what we were purchasing. At least I put myself in that category! :banghead:
    Your desire to sail up and down the Pacific coast with your first purchase means that you had better be pretty analytical about your expectations for safety, performance and comfort. Many will tell you that these 2 models are not particularly well-suited with regard to storage, tankage and sea-kindliness. Don't get me wrong, they are great for coastal sailing, but you are talking about live-aboard and extended cruising. If you don't have the inclination to learn more about your needs with your first purchase, with an eye toward your next purchase, you will have to be doubly sure of your requirements before you go through the significant, and possibly unnecessary, expense of modifying a boat that does not meet your needs.
    I am no expert on electric engines, but my sense is that the one with the Thunderstruck engine may not serve you very well for extended cruising. You should study the power supply requirements very carefully, with regard to projected power consumption and battery capacity. New standing rigging is very expensive and I would not contemplate the trips that you want to take without knowing the history of the standing rigging. With these boats, unless it is documented that standing rigging has been replaced very recently, you better budget replacement. That's just the start. Seemingly cosmetic repairs have a way of blossoming into major, expensive, repairs once you probe behind the surface (usually AFTER you've made the purchase). What does the boat include in the way of electronics? Will you need to purchase new electronics. That's an expensive way to upgrade, when you can often find used boats with electronics already upgraded.
    Generally speaking, it is far more expensive to upgrade and repair a boat at low-cost purchase price than to find a better boat with built-in upgrades. If you look for the best conditioned boats with the best upgrades and new equipment, even at higher initial purchase price, you will be more economical.
    The boat that is being sold with projects underway (did you say the engine install isn't completed?) is definitely not your best deal at almost any price. I'd throw that one away from consideration. How deep has the current owner gotten into his project only to decide that it isn't worthwhile any longer? That's not a good one for you if you want to hit the water sailing rather than diving into the water with an anchor around your neck!

    Finally, you would serve yourself well by reading as much as you can about people who have made that rapid progression from inexperienced boat owners to full-time cruisers. Some of these books have great suggestions on finding a particular boat that will match your expectations. The fact that all sailboats have a bow and a stern and one or two masts with sails is just a thin veneer that hides the important characteristics of sailboats that vary greatly, depending upon the owner's needs. Good luck with the search!
     


    Last edited: Feb 23, 2017
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  4. jssailem

    jssailem

    Joined Oct 22, 2014
    5,217 posts, 1,662 likes
    CAL 35 Cruiser
    US Salem, Moored Port Everett WA
    Budget. $15K. Expect: boat 20 years or more old, Repairs equal to or more than the cost of boat (especially if you are thinking of sailing in the ocean), greatest immediate cost is standing rigging - this means mast off boat, replace all shrouds and likely some of the connections to the mast or boat. Again plan to sail in ocean on northern coast of California. There is a reason that Humbolt County to the Pacific NW has a reputation as the graveyard for ships of all kinds.

    Fixing the soft deck spots especially around the mast are considered major repairs.

    Your looking at the right time of the year, just not sure your expectations are reasonable. Definitely stay around the 30ft length. Over that you'll find costs rise quickly in marina fees and maintenance.
     


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  5. whatfiero

    whatfiero

    Joined Oct 30, 2011
    542 posts, 42 likes
    klidescope 30t
    US norfolk
    Look at at least 10 boats in your price range call around marinas and ask if there are any 30' range boats available a lot of marinas have boats abandoned. Also standing rigging can be replaced mast up one piece at a time watch you tube videos and pick a boat that rig looks ok replace 1 piece every year until you have all new then wait 5 yr and start over again. Boats are expensive so fill a bucket with money every month starting this month and see how that works out for you before you buy a boat
     


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  6. wsmac

    wsmac

    Joined Feb 16, 2017
    134 posts, 23 likes
    Hunter 28.5
    US Humboldt
    I WANTED YOU ALL TO TELL ME TO BUY ONE OF THESE BOATS!... WAIT! ... no I didn't! ;)
    .
    Couple of things....
    First, about the comment on insulting me... I'm rather difficult to insult on the internet! lol
    Now... if I were actually speaking with you over the phone or face-to-face and you tried to insult me... well, actually, I most likely wouldn't take the bait even then! Just have more important things to run my brain around... like buying one of these really cool yachts! :yeah:
    .
    Secondly.... I appreciate the straightforwardness of the replies! :plus:
    .
    My timeline might not have been too clear... hahaha.... I'm looking at a couple of years before I venture too far away from my little home port... just sailing north to Trinidad, south to Shelter Cove, then expanding as I (and the boat) can handle it. HECK! I've got plenty of time... I'm only 56! :yikes:
    .
    I appreciate what you all are saying about just coughing up the money for a better, albeit more expensive, boat as opposed to buying low and spending more as I fix/upgrade.
    Perhaps I should just buy a $1K Hobie Cat and sail that while I keep vacuuming up pocket change from the couch cushions until I have that extra money for a nicer boat?
    .
    It would be hard, but it's technically possible for me to bump my financial range up to the $10K-$20K bracket, but really... that's all I could do.
    I have been looking out of my area... up through Oregon and into Washington, down to Sac, over to the Bay Area and south of that even.
    .
    As far as the 28.5 with the electric motor-in-a-box... this guy's story is that he and his wife came up here to live because they have adult kids up this way. He's not in the best shape for sailing anymore... just using the boat for weekend stays in the slip... and wants to stop paying for the slip, spending that money elsewhere.
    They brought the boat up with them from the Bay Area a year ago.
    He says he has everything to put the electric motor in and get it working... just wasn't interested in the boat anymore.
    .
    I can do some electrical... just finished replacing the traction battery in my Prius (that's the BIG battery pack everyone thought would cost $10K when they pooped out), worked on wiring for residential purposes, worked on guitar electronics as a pastime... that sort of stuff.
    I could follow directions and probably get the electric motor in, correctly aligned with the propeller shaft, and wired up and running.
    .
    I also feel confident in doing some glasswork. Excavating some rot out of the deck, filling, drilling, etc. is likely something I can do well also.
    Painting... I hate painting houses... but painting boats is MUCH MORE FUN EH? :confused:
    I'm not concerned about the laborious undertaking of prepping the bottom and deck, then working my way through glass-fixes, priming, painting.... But if any boat I do get, needs this work done... it's going to have to wait until our rainy season is over. This timeline would also allow me to get all my marbles in a line... or is that ducks in a box?
    .
    Sure, it'd be way more fun to not have to haul the boat out and work on it as a big project during the nice sunny, warm days when I could be out mountain biking... but owning a boat will cost me some sacrifices for sure!
    .
    Eh..... you folks are TOUGH here!
    I may go over to the Ericson Forum instead... I hear I can go down to my local hardware store for all I need to fix an Ericson 25+ that the owner took the motor out of, glassed over the hull where the hole was... built his own plywood tiller... among other things... I've already found stuff on my local Craigslist Free section that I think would turn that old boat into a MEGA-YACHT!
    .
    But hey... you didn't hurt my feelings none... :ass:
    .
    .
    sorry... just feeling a bit clownish this morning... not creepy-clownish... funny-clownish... ;)
     


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  7. Hunter Ad Bot

    Hunter Ad Bot

    Joined Oct 27, 2016
    0 posts, 10 likes
    US Seattle
    Deck fill caps for most Hunter sailboats

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    Stainless, nylon, in all the shapes and sizes, replacement caps are in stock.
    See the product
     


  8. wsmac

    wsmac

    Joined Feb 16, 2017
    134 posts, 23 likes
    Hunter 28.5
    US Humboldt
    Thanks for the comments so far and pm's.
    It's been a nice welcome for sure! :plus:
    .
    Another part of why I'm not too scared about buying a used, cheaper boat with the realization I would be putting in more money and definitely time in it to make it absolutely sea-worthy, is that I have this thing about knowing.
    .
    What I mean is... it's not enough for me to have something... use it without understanding how it works... and either throw it away or pay someone else to work on it if it's something I can learn to do.
    I have this nagging thing in my head where I feel compelled to take things apart to understand how they work, and how they go back together!

    I'm not a bad learner... really...
    EMT
    Commercial Diver
    Private pilot lessons (kid was born and stopped that endeavor... for a while... lol)
    Motorcyle and Bicycle Mechanic
    Medical Laboratory Tech
    Welder
    Alarm installer
    Computer savvy... all the way back to keypunch and big spools of tape
    Big rig driver
    Paratrooper
    ..... the list actually goes on... and on.... :eek:
    .
    I've rebuilt motorcycle and auto engines, soldered numerous electrical projects, installed new house wiring/plumbing/flooring/walls/roofing, opened up several laptop computers to replace memory/screens/batteries, sewn clothing/outdoor gear/wildland firefighting gear, I currently have a 3D printer and design my own projects to print....
    .
    What I'm hoping to illustrate is that I'm open to a variety of experiences, too eager sometimes for new projects and any learning I have to do along the way, and have no fear of spending my hard-earned money on something that 'might' turn out right in the end! :wink3:
    .
    Having typed all that... I don't want to pick up a boat that is truly a waste of time and money for me.
    I also do not want a project to extend out over several years... my attention span doesn't roll that long on any one thing (if you couldn't tell from my lists above? o_O ).
    .
    about the above comment... I totally understand owning a boat means constant upkeep and maintenance, unlike a house on land that you can let things slide and maybe never feel any real impact from the deferred maintenance!
    I mean a project that will keep the boat out of water and unliveable for years... hope that's clear? ;)
    .
    So I'm probably like many other starry-eyed, sail-off-in-my-dreams, underprepared kid... no wait... adult... eh... maybe something in between?
    .
    Keep it coming.... even the COLD HARD TRUTH as only you know it!
    I'm interested in what I can learn from others.
    :thumbup:
     


  9. Johnb

    Johnb

    Joined Jan 22, 2008
    1,042 posts, 78 likes
    Hunter 37-cutter
    US Richmond CA
    I don't want to come on too strongly but a boat with an electric motor partially installed is a total non starter for me.
    You don't know if once installed it will even basically function.
    We have thrashed this to death on this forum and everyone with real knowledge has concluded that electric propulsion is hopelessly inadequate in regards to any real capability.
    Also you need to have a plan for what you will do once you get the boat. Marina won't accept you without insurance, insurance won't accept you without a survey, can't pass survey with a partially assembled pile of junk. Then you have to find a live aboard space. I know people who could not afford a free boat because of the foregoing.
     


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  10. wsmac

    wsmac

    Joined Feb 16, 2017
    134 posts, 23 likes
    Hunter 28.5
    US Humboldt
    Other than watching youtube videos... I have no knowledge about the ability of this electric conversion to move the boat about. I'll look around for threads here on the subject to see what you all have been saying. Thanks!
    .
    The marina both boats are currently in does not require insurance! I asked yesterday after looking at the 28.5.
    BUT.... I will be checking on all surveys and insurance. We have 1 local surveyor I am told.
    The 28.5 has a longshaft outboard adequate to move the boat around.
    The Marina will DEFINITELY do an inspection for liveaboard status... even if the boat has been at their docks already.
    I will not live in a dilapidated old broken down boat... hell... I don't do that on land either.... although that would be called a house... ;)
    .
    Trying to think and research all the questions I should be asking of the various entities that will be getting involved in this endeavor! :)
     


  11. Scott T-Bird

    Scott T-Bird

    Joined Oct 26, 2008
    3,306 posts, 425 likes
    Starwind 27
    US Barnegat, NJ
    There is always value in learning about your boat's systems that comes from doing the projects yourself. The point I made before is that there is also a cost involved when you do these projects and in most instances the cost far exceeds anything that anybody ever anticipates. It appears that you have a desire to be economical so the reality is that you are far more likely to be economical by paying a higher purchase price for a boat that will have few project costs. Your most expensive option is typically the boat that has the least initial purchase price. Many of us have learned this from first-hand experience.
    Secondly, unless you enjoy the projects more than the sailing (or at least equal to), you are likely to be frustrated by the experience and it will be easy to wonder why you got started when you are sweating in the sun with your knuckles skinned up rather than downing a cold one in a beautiful anchorage.
    Many of us have gone through the project boat experience once, and finish the project very satisfied with the result, but with a resolve that the next boat will not be purchased this way. Almost all of us will agree that the learning experience is very valuable and you will also find A LOT of valuable knowledge, support and guidance in this forum based on first-hand experience. There is no doubt that you have or will learn the skills to perform the projects. The largest obstacle I think that you might face is that you underestimate the expense and time of any project that you undertake.
    The Hunter 28.5 is a very attractive boat in my eyes and is certainly worth consideration but don't underestimate the fiberglass repairs. The damages may be hidden until you really dig into it, and in my opinion, NOT a very satisfying work effort. I much prefer spending time and money on upgrades, not damage repair. Finishing the install on the electric engine could be a great experience, but I'm pretty convinced that the engine isn't suited to your cruising plans. Purchasing the 28.5 could be a great experience to learn boat systems and go coastal sailing, but I don't think it will satisfy your desire to sail the coastline on extended trips. You'll own the boat a few years and learn a lot, and by then you will know that you have to sell it to get what you really want. But, who knows, you may find yourself satisfied with local sailing and not interested in pursuing what you are thinking about now, in which case the boat may be good for you for a long time. Plans were always meant to be changed!
     


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  12. vhoisington

    vhoisington

    Joined Mar 13, 2011
    129 posts, 25 likes
    Islander Freeport 41
    US Longmont
    Well I'll chine in here.
    I'm guessing the 28.5 is an ice box, with a small head and holding tank, where as the 33 may have actual refrigeration and a reasonable sized holding tank for when you are entertaining the girl friend and kids. Something about kids will stretch a holding tank to its limits in a very short time.

    Besides the rigging, running and standing, how are the electronics. Does either boat offer shore power for a hair dyer or other conveniences. What is the shape of canvas (not sails) but bimini/dodger on either boat. How about heat, is that an option for either boat or do you need to supply your own.

    Fiberglass can be repaired, I agree the electric engine might work OK as long as you stay close to home but if you are traveling you will need to add Solar or wind generation and that will be much harder on a 28.5 just due to space limitations.

    Other boats to look at that should fall into your price range include older catalina 28 or 30's, Hunter 28 (upgraded version of the Hunter 28.5). Islander 28 or 32

    Just some food for thought.

    Good luck,
     


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  13. wsmac

    wsmac

    Joined Feb 16, 2017
    134 posts, 23 likes
    Hunter 28.5
    US Humboldt
    Figuring out how to 'like' posts and such... although so far I should 'like' everyone's... :thumbup:
    .
    Thanks Scott T-Bird.
    I was exchanging messages with another member here over the electric motor issue.
    Like I told them... my Prius can tow a 60' Airstream with a trailer and 4 quads loaded on in tandem.. UPHILL... BOTH WAYS!
    And that's just on the electric motor.. not the ICE! Really! Would I lie to you about a thing like that? :liar:
    .
    Although I did attach a small 4x8 trailer with 4 FS MTB's and drive all the way up to Oregon for some downhill fun once... that may be part of the reason my traction battery pooped out sooner than I anticipated! ;)
    .
    Installing a gas or diesel motor back into the 28.5 will cost me several thousands just to buy a motor... right?
    .
    Again.. as I messaged to the other person, the more responsible portion of my brain tells me to slow down (I thought I WAS going slow... too damn slow!)... maybe buy that nice Cape Dory 25 for < $2K, the almost new trailer for $1200... and have some fun with that for a year or two while I learn things about sailing I don't know but should (for coastal and blue water cruising), and find ways to make big dollars to buy UP to a proper off shore cruising boat.
    .
    Then again... I'm in secret negotiations with the person I've been messaging... they don't know it yet though... my strategy is to lay on the sympathy-sucking mode until they break and offer up THEIR boat to me for a song! Then when I'm happily sailing on my new boat... they're stuck on the couch watching Reality TV shows with a blank stare, thinking, "....why did I give him my boat again?... gee willikers!... I shore do miss that old boat!..." :cuss:
     


  14. wsmac

    wsmac

    Joined Feb 16, 2017
    134 posts, 23 likes
    Hunter 28.5
    US Humboldt
    I'm 6'2"... currently a svelt 230lbs (American) and I had room to sit on the head with comfort! Now... I forgot to drop trou and practice the cleanup maneuver so that might be an issue? ;)
    The kids are actually pretty hardy travelers! Young teens too! But yeah... it'd be nicer for them if certain accommodations were nicer as well!


    Not sure about the 33's electronics yet... that'll be tomorrow. The 28.5... he has a plotter that's not hooked up... says it works (not sure why it wasn't hooked up). An older radio that works but will need a new antenna cable. Need my notes for anything else... but I can update if desired.
    Both boats have decent sail covers/bags, wheel covers. The 28.5 does not have a bimini or dodger, the 33 I believe is set up for a bimini but there isn't one out on it... find out more tomorrow.
    Clean icebox on the 28.5, clean and functioning (according to the owner) alcohol stove. He was charging the batteries when I got there and flipped switches to show me which pumps worked, the lights (non-LED) worked, the dehumidifier worked....
    Both boats run onshore power currently.


    I went to the website for the outfit that makes the electronic motor. The owner bought it within the last year. The company is still in business, so I could contact them for any information not on their website. Solar and wind are upgrades I would make eventually anyway. I could mount the solar panels outboard like little wings to provide lift and reduce fluid friction on the hull.... saw THAT on the internet, so it MUST be true! ;)

    I have looked at the Catalina 30 and others in that size range.
    I find most of the boats in my current price range fall back into the 60's, 70's, and early 80's.
    Luckily... I can find pretty good information on the more popular (and some more obscure) builds!
    .
    .
    Although I'm a bit lacking in details about the 28.5, my plan was to return for a more thorough examination and information gathering. Due to circumstances that were aggravating me yesterday... I was late getting to the docks, it was raining pretty good for the most part, but the owner was really cool about the whole deal so I figured I'd keep it a cursory introduction.
     


  15. Allan12210

    Allan12210

    Joined Jan 22, 2008
    1,391 posts, 137 likes
    Hunter 34
    US Alameda CA
    For cruising you just can't beat the fact that a diesel can create hot fresh water. How long will it take to heat the water in your water tank running an electric motor? The same can be said for having an Espar diesel heater on board for those cold nights at anchor. I'd say pass on the 28.5 although a fine boat for day sails and some extended overnights (with its original engine). If that boat was on Clear Lake or Lake of the Ozarks, maybe electric would make sense, but not on the ocean or inside passage.

    The soft deck is also a pain to re-mediate even with the skill set you possess. Keep looking farther afield and something more suitable will turn up. Sometimes sellers are motivated by the most unpredictable reasons which can lead to a great deal for you. Keep looking at the electronic version of Latitude 38 or Latitude 48. You can always sail one home from either of those locations.
     


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  16. Ned Ludd

    Ned Ludd

    Joined Apr 4, 2016
    200 posts, 84 likes
    Newport 28
    US Richardson Marina
    Woohoo quite the thread.
    I feel that if you are going to buy a fixer upper it needs to be a serious diamond in the rough and CHEAP for the right reasons. Having partially installed systems and a bunch of stuff that "works" when finished being installed does not qualify. If it is a sound hull with NO soft spots but the rigging is old and in need of replacement there is room to negotiate. Anything that is not installed and functional has zero value in my book.
    Sailboats are definitely a buyers market, if a boat meets most of your requirements and has a punch list longer than the anchor rode consider offering 1/2 or less, most sellers realize the actual value of what they have and any offer is sometimes better than another months moorage and insurance.
    Don't buy the wrong boat because it is in your budget, I have spent the last 2 years looking at boats and evaluating them against my list of requirements for how I use the boat, my wife and I have seriously different lists. Once I found one that met most of the items on that list I went to the surveyors checklist to see if it is a good value. I recently purchased a boat which met both criteria. There was a folder of receipts on board from the upgrades over the past 3 years which added up to twice what I paid for the boat.
    Be realistic, I can almost guarantee that what you think is your ideal boat now will have many short comings after 2-3 seasons sailing her in various conditions.
    On the other hand you could just grab a gin & tonic and have faith it will all work out, that's how I bought my first big boat sight unseen on eBay. Worked out great for the past 9 years, was just time for a real head instead of a porta-pottie so the recent 4' upgrade
     


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  17. isaksp00

    isaksp00

    Joined Apr 27, 2010
    892 posts, 48 likes
    Hunter 23
    US Lake Wallenpaupack
    I'd be much more concerned about battery bank size and time to fully recharge with that electric powered 28.5 than whether the motor can power the boat. As noted, the issue of fully electric auxiliary has been discussed a lot. Once you know what size battery bank you need so you can cruise for however long you feel is needed for safety, see if the maximum recharge time is acceptable. At least with diesel you can pop in to most any marina, and be back out in about 15 minutes.
    I don't have an electric car (2 hybrids though) because I often drive 150-200 miles to a summer house (and its accompanying boat) and don't want to have to wait like 4 hours before I can drive again once there. Using that analogy, would that suit you in a boat?
     


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  18. wsmac

    wsmac

    Joined Feb 16, 2017
    134 posts, 23 likes
    Hunter 28.5
    US Humboldt
    I'm not sure how old the thread(s) on electric motors is that people are referencing here.
    The information I've been seeing during my recent search for a boat has led me to understand some electric conversions recharge using wind, solar, and regenerative charging from the prop/shaft motion when under sail.
    Now... I'm not saying everything about electric motors is at a level a person off shore should not have any concerns about... at least no more concerns than other forms of non-sail propulsion.
    .
    Your point about quick turn-around for gas/diesel driven boats is certainly something to take seriously as well.
    Especially if a boat is on a tight timeline to get moving again either for weather reasons or other.
    .
    For now... I am seeing that this electric conversion idea for the 28.5 is not for me. I'll need more, and more factual information about the advance in these systems with regards to powering a cruiser off shore... miles/hours away from a safe port.
     


  19. Justin_NSA

    Justin_NSA

    Joined Jul 7, 2004
    4,544 posts, 677 likes
    Hunter 30T
    US Cheney, KS
    For me, it's as simple as; limit as much battery consumption as possible on long, off shore voyages.
    None of the mentioned regenerative systems can reliably produce the wattage necessary to replenish the drain an electric motor would need.
     


  20. wsmac

    wsmac

    Joined Feb 16, 2017
    134 posts, 23 likes
    Hunter 28.5
    US Humboldt
    Thanks for all the input on electric motors, folks!
    .
    but I'd rather discuss the qualities, drawbacks, etc of the 2 specific boats of this thread.
    I hear there's already a hearty discussion of electric motors elsewhere.
    .
    So... although the 28.5 looks decent enough for the price (less than $7K) so far, the thought of spending another $2K-$3K just for a reliable diesel engine, getting that engine to my boat, installing the engine (and I'm not sure what else the owner may have done/removed from the boat while taking the old motor out), I'm pretty much looking at not getting this boat afterall.
    .
    I will be looking at the Hunter 33 today... if the owner's friend can still meet me.
    I'm still looking at listings online.
    In the event I find a boat that I feel I would need to have sailed to my home port, I've contacted one Captain who does deliveries and he was kind enough to provide me with some numbers on what it might cost (understanding that the amount can change depending on all factors).
    I will likely contact land-based transportation firms and see what their costs are as well.
    .
    So basically... the search goes on! :D
     


  21. jssailem

    jssailem

    Joined Oct 22, 2014
    5,217 posts, 1,662 likes
    CAL 35 Cruiser
    US Salem, Moored Port Everett WA
    The sailing of a boat to your marina can be a great experience. With a favorable Captain you can get a real education in Boat handling. As this may mean ocean sailing to Humbolt County you and the Captain will want to assure the boat is seaworthy.
     


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