1979 Hunter Cherubini 33 Questions

Discussion in 'Ask A Hunter Owner' started by scottc3387, May 15, 2019. Add this thread to a FAQ

  1. scottc3387

    scottc3387

    Joined May 15, 2019
    4 posts, 2 likes
    Hunter 27
    US Quincy, MA
    So I'm new to sailing. I've sailed smaller (21-27') boats the last couple years and am looking to upgrade to 30-36 foot. I've been boating my whole life but just switched to sailing. I have an opportunity to buy a 79 Hunter 33 for a great deal. Needs a motor but the seller says otherwise its in great shape. I just don't know enough about these boats to know if there are any common issues I should look for when I go look at the boat. Any input would be very much appreciated. Thanks
     


  2. Jackdaw

    Jackdaw

    Joined Nov 8, 2010
    10,073 posts, 3,082 likes
    Beneteau First 36.7 & 260
    US Minneapolis MN & Bayfield WI
    If a 50 year old sailboat needs a new motor, its junk. Negative economic value.

    It will cost more to replace it that one of those boats is worth with a OK motor. Keep looking.
     


    Last edited: May 15, 2019
  3. JRT

    JRT

    Joined Feb 14, 2017
    1,172 posts, 390 likes
    Catalina 310
    211 US Lake Guntersville, AL
    Agree, price the motor and the 'good deal' and then take that as your new price for a functional sailboat. I just made the same move from a 25' to a 31' and first started with only needs a few projects to finally getting something well maintained and ready to sail. And guess what I have projects still to do just nothing major at least.
     


  4. scottc3387

    scottc3387

    Joined May 15, 2019
    4 posts, 2 likes
    Hunter 27
    US Quincy, MA
    Thanks for the input so far. I've already priced out a motor and what the cost of the boat is and it still is way less than I can find one for. My biggest concern is common problems with these boats I might miss. I'm fine with a project, I restored a 70's cabin cruiser power boat before. I just don't want to start a project with a boat that might have a common flaw that doesn't make it worth it.
     


  5. Justin_NSA

    Justin_NSA

    Joined Jul 7, 2004
    5,572 posts, 1,171 likes
    Hunter 30T
    US Cheney, KS
    I'm with these guys. "Common flaws" are the least of your problems with a boat this old. You have structural core to check as well as the usual items like sails, hardware, standing rigging etc.
     


  6. scottc3387

    scottc3387

    Joined May 15, 2019
    4 posts, 2 likes
    Hunter 27
    US Quincy, MA
    So sails, hardware and rigging are all in good to great shape. Hull looks great. I went around looking for soft spots on the deck and hull and everything seemed solid. I guess my question should have been worded if these era hulls/design for the 33' have any specific issues.
     


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  7. Justin_NSA

    Justin_NSA

    Joined Jul 7, 2004
    5,572 posts, 1,171 likes
    Hunter 30T
    US Cheney, KS
    Good news on the condition Scott. I think we understand your question. Someone with an old Cheribuni will chime in I'm sure. The concern was whether you really want to speed the money and effort on an engine for an old boat that really isn't in big demand. Another way to look at it is what do they sell for in good shape? You'll probably miss this season but good luck with whatever you decide to do! :thumbup:
     


  8. JRT

    JRT

    Joined Feb 14, 2017
    1,172 posts, 390 likes
    Catalina 310
    211 US Lake Guntersville, AL


  9. Pizzazz

    Pizzazz

    Joined Sep 11, 2015
    101 posts, 31 likes
    Hunter 31
    US Marina del Rey
    There a couple of factors to consider. First, do you like the boat design? The Cherubini Hunter 33 has a good reputation but it is an old fashioned design, narrow beam, narrow stern, limited light. Those things you cannot change. It could be good for offshore work but you need to factor in replacing worn out parts, storage, sailing performance. Second, what is the condition? Not only the rigging, etc. but also inside. I have a slightly newer Hunter 31 and I happen to love its particular design/layout/space/sailing performance, so for me the investment in time and materials was worth it. Yet, there are parts of a 40 year old boat that you cannot easily change. The cabinetry is slowly falling apart. The cabin sole will eventually need replacement. The gelcoat is worn out. At some point, you just need to buy new, there is no point in maintaining an older boat. The motor is not such a big deal. You can get a second hand Yanmar diesel with plenty of life left for $3-4,000 and it will be a drop in replacement, you can do it in one weekend.

    One factor to consider with "cheap" boats is that you will be spending around $10k/year on slip fees and maintenance, even if you got the boat for free. After five years, you will be out a minimum of $50K but you will still have a $20K boat. It does not compute. Once boats go past 30 years, the residual value is minimal. It may make more sense to get a $50-60k boat instead. The key factor is, do you like the boat. Spend a couple of hours in the cockpit, etc. and you would know. We can't help you here other than share our thought process.

    In my case, I settled on headroom (needed 6'2") as my primary criterion, found some boats that I liked (i.e. HR 31 would have been the perfect boat for me), spend some time to understand what trade-offs designers typically make (for example, deck stepped masts are better because the saloon is much neater, forward head vs. aft head, etc. and then started looking for boats that would have as many of the criteria of my dream boat as possible for an affordable price. Four years later, I could not be happier with my decision given my use of the boat and preferences. So, do not buy a boat because it is cheap, buy a boat because it makes you happy.

    SV Pizzazz
     


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  10. JRT

    JRT

    Joined Feb 14, 2017
    1,172 posts, 390 likes
    Catalina 310
    211 US Lake Guntersville, AL
    Nice approach @Pizzazz ! We looked at new boats for awhile but found a great boat that makes us almost as happy and without a new boat loan the size of a second house.
     


  11. Hunter Ad Bot

    Hunter Ad Bot

    Joined Oct 27, 2016
    0 posts, 12 likes
    US Seattle
  12. RoyS

    RoyS

    Joined Jun 3, 2012
    477 posts, 188 likes
    Hunter 33
    US Bay Pointe, Quincy
    Have one of those. You can expect some or all of the following: Compression post corroded out in the bilge. Holding tank needs to be replaced and upsized. Original was a rubber expandable tank. Fuel tank leaking slowly through an untreated plywood base due to corrosion. Water tank pitted and leaking. Water tank pick up porous due to corrosion. Engine, well you know about that. Terrible electrical wiring. Urgent need to upgrade electronics. Deck leaks. Plumbing leaking everywhere. Cabin sole shot. Upholstery shot. Otherwise a fine boat.
     


  13. rgranger

    rgranger

    Joined Jan 19, 2010
    6,122 posts, 1,603 likes
    Hunter 26
    US Smith Mountain Lake
    How can your resist that!;)
     


  14. RoyS

    RoyS

    Joined Jun 3, 2012
    477 posts, 188 likes
    Hunter 33
    US Bay Pointe, Quincy
    Do yourself a favor and buy something much newer in near perfect shape. Expect to spend about 50K. You will spend that much anyway repairing and upgrading the 40 year old boat. We sailors are all dreamers but you have to be realistic in this case.
     


  15. rgranger

    rgranger

    Joined Jan 19, 2010
    6,122 posts, 1,603 likes
    Hunter 26
    US Smith Mountain Lake
    Just to double down on what @RoyS said...

    I purchased a very well kept Hunter 26 for $10K... I then spent $2K for new sails, .... and another $2K-ish for a new Outboard,... and about that much on trailer repairs and misc. So all in, I now have a really nice boat that cost me out of pocket $16K. I could have easily found a mint condition H26 for $15K. People never get back what they put into a boat when they sell it.... so I'd suggest looking for a boat that someone put a lot into.....
     


  16. RoyS

    RoyS

    Joined Jun 3, 2012
    477 posts, 188 likes
    Hunter 33
    US Bay Pointe, Quincy
    Forgot to mention sails and refrigeration to replace ice box. Original mainsail traveler was undersized also. Winches probably obsolete non-self tailing. One forgets. You will find it difficult to make a priority list. I have my 1980 nearly up to date but I have been working steadily on it for 17 years.
     


  17. scottc3387

    scottc3387

    Joined May 15, 2019
    4 posts, 2 likes
    Hunter 27
    US Quincy, MA
    Thanks everyone for the input. Definitely have helped make my decision. I'll keep looking.
     


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  18. JRT

    JRT

    Joined Feb 14, 2017
    1,172 posts, 390 likes
    Catalina 310
    211 US Lake Guntersville, AL
    Probably a wise move @scottc3387 I had dreams of a fixer upper and after some realistic limitations on my time I went all in on our C310. She is a 2003 model and I expect her to depreciate. Even in 10 years I think she will still sell quickly if we want to upgrade and fetch a good price since I can maintain her in her great condition vs restoring.
     


  19. MikeHoncho

    MikeHoncho

    Joined Dec 28, 2015
    294 posts, 120 likes
    Laser, Hunter H30 Standard
    Un Tacoma
    I beam failure in the bilge, soft cabin top especially in the raised area around the mast. No one can comment on "is it worth it" without knowing, at least, the price point , seeing some pictures and knowing your intentions with it.