Registered users don't see ads
  1. Need help with the forums? Have a question, suggestion, or complaint? Let us know!
  2. What happened to the mobile app??? Updated 10/15: now two options.

So, lets talk anchors

Discussion in 'Ask All Sailors' started by dscribner, Jan 9, 2017. Add this thread to a FAQ

  1. kloudie1

    kloudie1

    Joined Nov 6, 2006
    6,779 posts, 163 likes
    Hunter 34
    US Mandeville Louisiana
    Genuine Bruce.. works really well in our stuff here on the Gulf coast where rocks are few and far between.
     


  2. Stu Jackson

    Stu Jackson

    Joined Feb 26, 2004
    18,947 posts, 237 likes
    Catalina 34
    US C34 San Francisco


  3. drdanj

    drdanj

    Joined Jun 15, 2009
    34 posts, 1 likes
    Catalina 36
    US Channel Islands Harbor
    Practical Sailor did a recent set of articles (within the last year?) worth reviewing.
     


  4. Pilgrimtex

    Pilgrimtex

    Joined Oct 13, 2013
    100 posts, 15 likes
    Beneteau 37 Oceanis Platinum Edition
    US Seabrook
    Before purchasing an anchor; give yourself a treat and check out Mantus Anchors. http://www.mantusanchors.com/
    I own 4 including a 55#, 45#, 35# and a dinghy anchor. You'll be glad you did. They also have other really good stuff including the strongest swivel on the market.
    Good comparison videos etc.
    Located right there in kemah, TX.
     


    Mantus 1 likes this.
  5. dscribner

    dscribner

    Joined Nov 9, 2008
    1,275 posts, 19 likes
    Lancer 25
    US Biddeford, Maine
    Mainsail,

    the only place I.ve dragged, are you sitting, Cocktail Cove! Tucked in for the night with 300 of my closest friends and ended up 25 feet from shore, come 4 a.m. the wind had shifted from our normal southerlies to screaming in from the N-NE. I woke because the breaking waves on the beach seemed to close. I was right.
     


  6. capta

    capta

    Joined Jun 4, 2009
    1,485 posts, 125 likes
    Pearson 530
    XX Sailing in the Windward or Leeward Islands where ever we are anchored
    I'm not sure what"studies" you are talking about, but unless you anchor EXCLUSIVELY in sand or mud, most probably you will one day lose either your anchor or worst case scenario, your boat, if you anchor with a line/chain rode on rocky, coral, or foul bottoms. All it would take is one tide change or wind shift to have the line wrap around a rock or other sharp object and well, I'm sure you get the point. If you're a lucky guy, you'll be aboard and awake when it happens.
    Walking through Spice Island Boat Yard, I had to take a pic of THIS Mantus. It seemed to be on an appropriately sized vessel (cat) with a bridle rigged.
    Draw your own conclusions as to whether you want a Mantus or not after seeing this bent mantus (1024x768).jpg .
     


    Last edited: Jan 10, 2017
  7. Maine Sail

    Maine Sail Moderator

    Joined Feb 6, 1998
    10,015 posts, 183 likes
    Canadian Sailcraft 36T
    US Casco Bay, ME
    There's no anchor I know of that is imune to bending or even breaking. The good news is if the owner of that Mantus were to pick the the phone, he'd quickly discover that Mantus stands behind its product with one of the best warranties in the business...

    What really matters is how the company supports the anchor and stands behind it. Fortress & Mantus have two of the best warranties in the business and both stand behind the product extremely well, perhaps these two are the best in the industry.

    I actually love the one sentence Mantus warranty:

    "OUR WARRANTY
    Mantus anchors provides a lifetime warranty on its products and parts against damage or manufacturing defects."


    That's it no small print.....

    Compare that to other manufacturers who's warranties are non-existent for bending or "damage" or those withmultiple paragraphs of "small print":...
     


    Mantus 1 likes this.
  8. Mark Maulden

    Mark Maulden

    Joined Jan 25, 2011
    1,167 posts, 41 likes
    S2 11.0A
    US Anacortes, WA
    Are the bolts on the Mantus a maintenance item?
     


  9. sesmith

    sesmith

    Joined Jul 1, 2010
    446 posts, 27 likes
    Seaward 25
    US Ithaca, NY
    25 lb Mantus on our Seaward 25. It's been a great anchor for us. Always sets quickly and holds in wind changes, even in weeds. Fortress FX11 is our backup. It held great, as well, except in weeds and wind changes...the reason for the Mantus.

    To those who spend time in rocky Maine... We plan to do a trip up to Penobscot bay this season. Do I need to plan a trip line / float of some sort (something I've never worried about in our usual cruising grounds).
     


  10. chrisings

    chrisings

    Joined Nov 14, 2013
    220 posts, 14 likes
    Catalina 30 MkI 1983 TRBS
    US Westbrook, CT
    Mantus for us, Fortress as a backup/lunch hook.
     


  11. Pilgrimtex

    Pilgrimtex

    Joined Oct 13, 2013
    100 posts, 15 likes
    Beneteau 37 Oceanis Platinum Edition
    US Seabrook
    QUOTE: Walking through Spice Island Boat Yard, I had to take a pic of THIS Mantus. It seemed to be on an appropriately sized vessel (cat) with a bridle rigged.
    Draw your own conclusions as to whether you want a Mantus or not after seeing this End Quote.
    A: The owner may actually have a very high opinion of that anchor. We don't know because a photo doesn't tell the whole story.
    B: I don't see a failure of the anchor from this photo but thank goodness they had it.
    I took a couple picks of my 55# to show the construction of the tip.
    20170110_203121.jpg 20170110_203130.jpg
     


    Last edited: Jan 10, 2017
  12. Mantus 1

    Mantus 1

    Joined May 11, 2016
    13 posts, 1 likes
    Hunter Passage 42
    US Florida Jensen Beach
    I hope that that customer with the bent tip contacts us!! We do have a Lifetime Warranty! And we do want to know how this happened and find out when it was purchased! So we can take steps to improve our products!
     


    justsomeguy likes this.
  13. Mantus 1

    Mantus 1

    Joined May 11, 2016
    13 posts, 1 likes
    Hunter Passage 42
    US Florida Jensen Beach
    Hello Mark.
    If the bolts have been installed as instructed in the instructions with the grease that is in the box. There will be no problems at the joint. But as the anchor is used the galvanizing will be worn off and you may want to change out the bolts in 3 to 5 years if they show signs of rust.
     


  14. capta

    capta

    Joined Jun 4, 2009
    1,485 posts, 125 likes
    Pearson 530
    XX Sailing in the Windward or Leeward Islands where ever we are anchored
    So you are saying you would continue to use this anchor even with the bend? I find it hard to believe with that much bend it would function as well as the designed point. Kinda like driving 90 mph on bald tires, IMO.
     


  15. Mark Maulden

    Mark Maulden

    Joined Jan 25, 2011
    1,167 posts, 41 likes
    S2 11.0A
    US Anacortes, WA
    I guess my question more specifically, would the bolts/nuts loosen with useage? Necessitating a "torque check" at any time?Tnx
     


  16. dscribner

    dscribner

    Joined Nov 9, 2008
    1,275 posts, 19 likes
    Lancer 25
    US Biddeford, Maine
    I've been looking into anchors for the past week so... I'm an expert!!! Ha! One fairly long and egaging rticle went on about anchor size, large boat, small boat, stuff like that. I'll see if I can dig it out and link it. Among other things, it went thru the physics of anchoring, calculating catenary arc, force on the anchor, rodes bar tight. What it comes down to is chain is required the first (place favorite length here) feet. This protects the rope rode from wear on the bottom. Beyond that there is no calculatable benefit, other than not dancing so much at anchor. By the numbers, an all chain rode has more perceived benefit that actual benefit. This guy also said that choosing a smaller, stronger chain than BBB shows great benefits. Again, I'll see if I can dig it out.
     


  17. Mantus 1

    Mantus 1

    Joined May 11, 2016
    13 posts, 1 likes
    Hunter Passage 42
    US Florida Jensen Beach
    Hi Mark,
    With the split lock style of lock washers we have not had any bolts coming loose over time with use. I know that some of our customers have checked them and not found them loose after 2 to 3 years of heavy use.
    I hope this answers your question Mark.
    Thank you, Dean
     


  18. Kings Gambit

    Kings Gambit

    Joined Jul 27, 2011
    1,771 posts, 137 likes
    Bavaria 38E
    US Ventura Harbor
    dscribner,
    There are in my opinion more advantages than disadvantages to all chain (or nearly so) rode over all nylon (excepting the leader chain portion, of course), at least for a large (> 36 ft) coastal cruising yacht. 1) One can anchor safely on much shorter scope. Due to less chain rode veered out, and the fact that its weight tends to bring the boat up in light airs, chain reduces the swinging radius around the boat which facilitates use in "crowded anchorages." 2) Generally, chain is more durable, especially SS chain, and does not chafe or melt (at the chocks) as nylon can. (Although one must occasionally "freshen the nip" of the nylon snubber.) 3) (one you did not mention) Due to all its weight it can be effectively deployed very fast by "gravity drop" even while the boat is making serious leeway in a fresh or strong breeze, and still set quickly by getting a lot of weight down quickly.

    True, it's heavy; but on a big boat that's not a problem. If the windlass fails, you might have trouble recovering. Mine has, and I've recovered manually, and it is a lot of trouble. So, maintain the windlass so it does not fail short of a total electrical failure.

    As to strength, nylon can be stronger than chain, as we know, as rated to a given sized boat. I suppose one might carry larger chain to compensate. However, the failures at anchor that most of us will ever experience is when an anchor drags or pulls out; not a parting of the chain or nylon rode.
     


    Last edited: Jan 11, 2017
  19. RoyS

    RoyS

    Joined Jun 3, 2012
    143 posts, 21 likes
    Hunter 33
    US Marina Bay, Quincy
    Happy with a Rocna. The Mantus bolts have little value in my mind and they probably would hold onto mud when you bring the anchor back aboard. I was rundown once by a huge trawler that also dragged in cocktail cove with short scope and a large CQR. New style scoop anchors seem to work great.
     


    capta likes this.
  20. capta

    capta

    Joined Jun 4, 2009
    1,485 posts, 125 likes
    Pearson 530
    XX Sailing in the Windward or Leeward Islands where ever we are anchored
    I really do not pay any attention at all to "theoretical" anchoring information. I've been anchoring vessels of all sorts since the early 60's, both with all chain and some with chain/rope. I never anchor under "controlled conditions". We've somewhere around 1400 straight nights at anchor in various places around the WI, excepting a 5 day haulout a few months back. Nothing "theoretical" about it. There is absolutely NOTHING perceived in an all chain rode with a snub line. There is absolutely no possibility that something underwater will chafe through all chain (see pic; this "something underwater" was tangled Anchor wrapped in chain, chaguaramas (800x600).jpg
    in the middle of the anchor chain) or the chain to line splice will wear through. We don't anchor for the best conditions we expect, but the worst.
    With a chain/line rode, anchoring in the SoPac and Oz, I carried a goodly number of fishing floats to "float" the line from the chain to the boat so it wouldn't wrap on coral heads or get cut on rocks. That takes about a hour to set up and half that to undo each time I anchored. Without the buoys, I couldn't sleep very well.
    As for anchors, after over 50 years as a professional mariner, I completely blew off the idea of "next gen" anchors. My genuine CQR was just fine as were genuine Danforths (in their place), but there were places like the chutes in Admiralty Bay where it wasn't. Occasionally I'd see a boat stick in these chutes and other hard to hold areas. I'd go over and ask what anchor they were using. Rocna was the reply, each and every time. Not long after this, good fortune smiled on us as we were able to pick up an 88#er for a quarter of it's retail price. Hey, a cheap experiment even if it didn't work, right?
    Well, for the next year we dove on that anchor almost every time we anchored and found the it rarely took more than it's own length to set! And I NEVER back down to set my anchor (unless Med mooring). In several decent (60+kn) middle of the night blows it held perfectly. Same with tidal situations; reset in it's own length.
    So, the old salt had to admit that there was something to the "new gen" anchor hype, at least for my purposes down here. In another area, such as the Canadian Maritimes, where I'm guessing the anchoring is mostly on rocky bottoms, I'd go with another anchor I'm sure.
    I don't mean to sound "preachy", only to pass on real world experience to balance the "theoretical" anchoring information available to you on the web. In the end, all chain is basically no safer than chain/line if you don't have a proper snub line system. None of us can carry chain strong enough that if the chain is straight from the anchor to the boat and the seas are up. In effect your chain/line system is a chain/snub system, only the bit of the snub in the water is rather perishable.
     



Gray Enterprises port gasket
Stop winter leaks. Compare our price!
Stainless documentation placard
Who said a documentation placard cant be beautiful? Brushed stainless with laser-fused numerals.
LED bulb conversion chart
No bulb numbers needed. Beat the heat with cool LED light.
Merriman pedestal control head
Finally, an aluminum replacement for this YS Merriman part.